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I need to round decimal numbers to six places using JavaScript, but I need to consider legacy browsers so I can't rely on Number.toFixed

The big catch with toExponential, toFixed, and toPrecision is that they are fairly modern constructs not supported in Mozilla until Firefox version 1.5 (although IE supported the methods since version 5.5). While it's mostly safe to use these methods, older browsers WILL break so if you are writing a public program it's recommended you provide your own prototypes to provide functionality for these methods for older browser.

I'm considering using something like

Math.round(N*1000000)/1000000

What is the best method for providing this a prototype to older browsers?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Try this:

if (!Number.prototype.toFixed)

    Number.prototype.toFixed = function(precision) {
        var power = Math.pow(10, precision || 0);
        return String(Math.round(this * power)/power);
    }
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While some might not consider this a javascript toFixed shim or a shiv, the presence of those words on this page would have made my google search about 10 seconds quicker ;) –  Ryan Wheale Sep 12 '12 at 20:07
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I think Firefox 1.5 and IE 5 are pretty much no longer used, or by a very minor quantity of people.
It is a bit like coding to support Netscape Navigator... :-)
Unless some other major browser (Opera? Safari? unlikely...) doesn't support this, or if your Web logs show lot of legacy browser use, you can probably just use these methods.
Sometime, we have to move on. ^_^

[EDIT] Works fine on Opera 9.50 and Safari 3.1

javascript: var num = 3.1415926535897932384; alert(num.toFixed(7));

The article you reference is a year and half ago, an eternity in IT industry... I think that, unlike IE users, Firefox users often go to the latest version.

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This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post. –  Patrick Kostjens Nov 13 '13 at 15:13
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@PatrickKostjens are you aware you are criticizing a response given 5 years ago? ("an eternity in IT industry", to quote myself...) If you plan to criticize all these kinds of responses in SO, you have some work ahead! :-) Beside, it is a real answer in a sense the OP should not care about browsers that were already obsolete at the time of the question... Ie. that his question was probably pointless. –  PhiLho Nov 14 '13 at 15:55
2  
I was not aware of that. I agree that is a very long time. This post was in my review queue. I think it was flagged low quality by someone, otherwise I don't know why it would show up for review. –  Patrick Kostjens Nov 14 '13 at 21:32
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From Bytes website, this function is almost the same than Serge llinsky's:

if (!num.toFixed) 
{
  Number.prototype.toFixed = function(precision) 
  {
     var num = (Math.round(this*Math.pow(10,precision))).toString();
     return num.substring(0,num.length-precision) + "." + 
            num.substring(num.length-precision, num.length);
  }
}
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Another option is ( which doesn't convert to a string unnecessarily, and also corrects the miscalculation of (162.295).toFixed(2) to 162.29 ( should be 162.30 )).

Number.prototype._toFixed=Number.prototype.toFixed; //Preserves the current function
Number.prototype.toFixed=function(precision){
/* step 1 */ var a=this, pre=Math.pow(10,precision||0);
/* step 2 */ a*=pre; //currently number is 162295.499999
/* step 3 */ a = a._toFixed(2); //sets 2 more digits of precision creating 16230.00
/* step 4 */ a = Math.round(a);
/* step 5 */ a/=pre;
/* step 6 */ return a._toFixed(precision);
}
/*This last step corrects the number of digits from 162.3 ( which is what we get in
step 5 to the corrected 162.30. Without it we would get 162.3 */

Edit: Upon trying this specific incarnation, this*=Math.pow(10, precision||0) creates an error invalid left-hand assignment. So gave the this keyword the variable a. It would also help if I closed my functions ^_^;;

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Try this:

 Number.prototype.toFixed = function(precision) {
     var power = Math.pow(10, precision || 0);
     return String(Math.round(this * power)/power);
 }
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