Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to loop over the a matrix and do the correlation coefficient of each two-row and print out the correlation matrix.

ID A B C D E F G H I
Row01 0.08 0.47 0.94 0.33 0.08 0.93 0.72 0.51 0.55
Row02 0.37 0.87 0.72 0.96 0.20 0.55 0.35 0.73 0.44
Row03 0.19 0.71 0.52 0.73 0.03 0.18 0.13 0.13 0.30
Row04 0.08 0.77 0.89 0.12 0.39 0.18 0.74 0.61 0.57
Row05 0.09 0.60 0.73 0.65 0.43 0.21 0.27 0.52 0.60
Row06 0.60 0.54 0.70 0.56 0.49 0.94 0.23 0.80 0.63
Row07 0.02 0.33 0.05 0.90 0.48 0.47 0.51 0.36 0.26
Row08 0.34 0.96 0.37 0.06 0.20 0.14 0.84 0.28 0.47
........
(30000 rows!)

I want the Pearson correlation output as:

 Row01
Row01 1.000
Row02 0.012
Row03 0.023
Row04 0.820
Row05 0.165
Row06 0.230
Row07 0.376
Row08 0.870

output as Row01.txt

Row02
Row01 0.012
Row02 1.000
Row03 0.023
Row04 0.820
Row05 0.165
Row06 0.230
Row07 0.376
Row08 0.870

output as Row02.txt. . . . .

output files will be 30000!

I am aware of this algorithm looks stupid, that matrix<-cor(T(data)) will do the whole thing, and half of the corr matrix is enough as the corr result is symmetric along the diagonal.

But my problems are

  1. my data is too big for R to handle 30000x30000.
  2. It is hard to retrieve the specific correlations of a specific row with the rest.
  3. Using my "stupid algorithm" I can easily get the corr of my interest from the folder.
share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

Not tested, but something like this should work I guess

EDIT: corrected code to avoid huge matrix

correl <- NULL
for (i in 1:nrow(datamatrix))
    {
    correl <- apply(datamatrix, 1, function(x){cor(datamatrix[,i], x)})
    write.table(correl, paste("col", i, ".txt", sep="")
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Hm I fear that doesn't fly. Original Poster claimed datamatrix was too big for memory. –  Dirk Eddelbuettel Jul 30 '10 at 17:02
    
@Dirk Eddelbuettel: hmmm that's true, I assumed he was talking about the output matrix, but the input matrix is huge too... didn't think about that. wasn't there a package to handle huge matrices in memory or am I wrong? –  nico Jul 30 '10 at 20:43
    
Thanks! I had problem with my SUSE where I want to use. I will try the code and get back soon. –  Ivan Oct 6 '10 at 12:42
add comment

Thanks Nico! Almost got there after I corrected small bugs. Here I attach my script:

datamatrix=read.table("ref.txt",sep="\t",header=T,row.names=1)
correl <- NULL
for (i in 1:nrow(datamatrix)) {
  correl <- apply(datamatrix, 1, function(x){cor(t(datamatrix[,i]))})
  write.table(correl, paste(row.names(datamatrix)[i], ".txt", sep=""))
}

But I am afraid the function(x) part is of problem, that seems to be t(datamatrix[i,j]), which will calculate corr of any two rows.

Actually I need to iterate through the matrix. first cor(row01, row02) get one correlation between rwo01 and row02; then cor(row01, row03) to get the correlation of row01 and rwo03, ....and till correlation between row01 row30000.Now I got the first column for

      row01
Row01 **1.000**
Row02 0.012
Row03 0.023
Row04 0.820
Row05 0.165
Row06 0.230
Row07 0.376
Row08 0.870

and save it to file row01.txt;

Similarly get

      Row02
Row01 0.012
Row02 **1.000**
Row03 0.023
Row04 0.820
Row05 0.165
Row06 0.230
Row07 0.376
Row08 0.870

and save it to file row02.txt.

Totally I will get 30000 files. It is stupid, but this can skip the memory limit and can be easily handled for the correlation of a specific row.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I would recommend looking at the bigmemory package and the foreach package, to do these calculations in large memory mapped files (i.e. input matrix is one file, correlation matrix is another). This way you can make use of multiple cores and not store much in RAM.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.