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This is the text of my program:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <sstream>
#include <fstream>
using namespace std;

int main(){
    string line;
    ifstream inf("grid.txt");
    while(!inf.eof()){
        getline(inf, line);
        cout << line;
    }
    return 0;
}

(I'll be using sstream later)

This is the contents of grid.txt:

08 02 22 97 38 15 00 40 00 75 04 05 07 78 52 12 50 77 91 08
49 49 99 40 17 81 18 57 60 87 17 40 98 43 69 48 04 56 62 00
81 49 31 73 55 79 14 29 93 71 40 67 53 88 30 03 49 13 36 65
52 70 95 23 04 60 11 42 69 24 68 56 01 32 56 71 37 02 36 91
22 31 16 71 51 67 63 89 41 92 36 54 22 40 40 28 66 33 13 80
24 47 32 60 99 03 45 02 44 75 33 53 78 36 84 20 35 17 12 50
32 98 81 28 64 23 67 10 26 38 40 67 59 54 70 66 18 38 64 70
67 26 20 68 02 62 12 20 95 63 94 39 63 08 40 91 66 49 94 21
24 55 58 05 66 73 99 26 97 17 78 78 96 83 14 88 34 89 63 72
21 36 23 09 75 00 76 44 20 45 35 14 00 61 33 97 34 31 33 95
78 17 53 28 22 75 31 67 15 94 03 80 04 62 16 14 09 53 56 92
16 39 05 42 96 35 31 47 55 58 88 24 00 17 54 24 36 29 85 57
86 56 00 48 35 71 89 07 05 44 44 37 44 60 21 58 51 54 17 58
19 80 81 68 05 94 47 69 28 73 92 13 86 52 17 77 04 89 55 40
04 52 08 83 97 35 99 16 07 97 57 32 16 26 26 79 33 27 98 66
88 36 68 87 57 62 20 72 03 46 33 67 46 55 12 32 63 93 53 69
04 42 16 73 38 25 39 11 24 94 72 18 08 46 29 32 40 62 76 36
20 69 36 41 72 30 23 88 34 62 99 69 82 67 59 85 74 04 36 16
20 73 35 29 78 31 90 01 74 31 49 71 48 86 81 16 23 57 05 54
01 70 54 71 83 51 54 69 16 92 33 48 61 43 52 01 89 19 67 48

I'm compiling this under Cygwin and g++ and here's what I get:

$ g++ program.cpp
$ ./a.exe
01 70 54 71 83 51 54 69 16 92 33 48 61 43 52 01 89 19 67 48

To save you looking - that's the last line of the file. If I replace the loop with:

getline(inf, line);
cout << line;
getline(inf, line);
cout << line;

it will display not the first, but the second line of the file. It's been a while since I've last programmed in C++ but I'm 90% sure it's supposed to display more than one line there...

share|improve this question
    
It works perfectly for me (using g++ under Fedora though). –  nico Jul 30 '10 at 15:16
1  
Works for me. However, you should write while (getline(...)). Also note that line doesn't include the line separator itself, thus you should write cout << line << endl;. –  Philipp Jul 30 '10 at 15:16
1  
@Philipp - "line" doesn't include the line separator itself -- bingo. It's outputting every line, but each line overwrites the previous since there is \r but no \n... Cygwin has some magic to munge text file line endings, too. –  jmanning2k Jul 30 '10 at 15:55
    
@jmanning2k: Interstingly it works when called from the Emacs minibuffer, but not when called from the Gnome terminal. But aniway it requires Windows-style line endings, otherwise nothing could ever be overwritten. –  Philipp Jul 30 '10 at 16:10

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Try adding a std::endl, which will automatically append a newline and flush the buffer.

You can also use the istream& getline ( istream& is, string& str, char delim ); signature to specify another delimiter than the default which is newline in case your file doesn't have any.

share|improve this answer

What file format is your grid.txt? It's likely that your lines end with a carriage return \r

Just as I finished asking my question I tried:

cout << "hi";

before changing it to the two couts. When I got two extra characters, that's when I realized I was getting the \r character. (Can you tell I've ran into problems with the carriage return before? :P )

share|improve this answer
    
I think you have the right answer. I just created a text file with \r line terminations and then the code just prints out the last line. –  Praetorian Jul 30 '10 at 15:20
1  
Indeed. Cygwin/g++ will assume Unix-style line endings (just \n), but if you created the file on Windows it might contain \r characters for compatibility with manual typewriters. –  Mike Seymour Jul 30 '10 at 15:29
    
I've been bitten by the \r when I was doing some data mining for my CSCI 2 final project. It was easier to see then because the lines weren't the same length, but it was worse because I had no idea what char(13)/carriage return was. OTOH, cr's are terribly useful if you want one single line of changing data. I used that one a lot in my assembly class ^_^ –  Wayne Werner Jul 30 '10 at 16:03

You're not emitting a newline at the end of the lines, so they're overwriting each other.

Change the output line to

cout << line << endl;
share|improve this answer
    
Why would the lines overwrite each other? They should just get written out as one long line. That's the output the OP's code produces on VS2008. –  Praetorian Jul 30 '10 at 15:18
    
@Prae, because he's outputting carriage returns but not newlines. Not sure if that's because the file is written that way, or if something is swallowing the newlines. –  Paul Tomblin Jul 30 '10 at 15:20
    
yes, if the file has \r line terminations getline() is reading the whole thing as one single line, including all the \r's. Then, when you print it to the terminal it keeps jumping back to the beginning of the line every time it sees a \r. So you're right about the overwriting part, but your solution won't work because by the time you print that endl the damage is already done. –  Praetorian Jul 30 '10 at 15:27

You're reading binary data using getline. Try using read() instead.

share|improve this answer
    
It's not binary data, it's text digits –  Michael Mrozek Jul 30 '10 at 15:18
    
Is this not a hex dump? Sorry, my mistake –  Jay Aug 2 '10 at 14:37

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