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I am not sure if this is the best way to have before and after functions be called around a function f1().

class ba(object):
    def __init__(self, call, before, after):
        self.call = call
        self.before = before
        self.after = after

    def __call__(self, *args):
        self.before()
        r = self.call(*args)
        self.after()
        return r


class test1(object):
    def mybefore(self):
        print "before func call"

    def myafter(self):
        print "after func call"

def meth1(a1, a2):
    print "meth1(a1=%d, a2=%d)" % (a1, a2)

t = test1()

wmeth1 = ba(meth1, t.mybefore, t.myafter)

wmeth1(1, 2)

Please advise.

share|improve this question
1  
You could use decorator syntax if you do not need to call original meth1, and you could merge ba and test1 into single class if you dont need to call different after/before methods. Otherwise, I believe there is no simplier way. –  Daniel Kluev Jul 30 '10 at 16:02
2  
more decorators than you can shake a dict at: wiki.python.org/moin/PythonDecoratorLibrary especially "Easy Dump of Function Arguments" and "Pre-/Post-Conditions" –  msw Jul 30 '10 at 16:08

2 Answers 2

I'd use a decorator, like so:

from functools import wraps

class withBeforeAfter(object):
    def __init__(self, before, after):
        self.before = before
        self.after = after
    def __call__(self, wrappedCall):
        @wraps(wrappedCall)
        def wrapCall(*args, **kwargs):
            try:
                self.before()
                r = wrappedCall(*args, **kwargs)
            finally:
                self.after()
            return r
        return wrapCall

 # to use it:
 @withBeforeAfter(myBefore, myAFter)
 def myFunc(...):
     ...

 # or:
 def myFunc(...):
     ...
 # later...
 myFunc = withBeforeAfter(myBefore, myAfter)(myFunc)
share|improve this answer
    
How's that? Good names are hard, you know! –  Walter Mundt Jul 30 '10 at 17:54
    
+1 good decorator name –  msw Jul 30 '10 at 19:46
    
I am getting: Traceback (most recent call last): File "C:\Temp\4.py", line 35, in <module> myFunc = withBeforeAfter(myBefore, myAfter)(myFunc) TypeError: object.__new__() takes no parameters I tried with 2.5, 2.7 and 3.1 –  Elias Bachaalany Aug 2 '10 at 12:29
    
Oops, was missing a couple of underscores around the init method. Edited to fix. –  Walter Mundt Aug 2 '10 at 15:57
    
Oops, I did not notice that too! Thanks! –  Elias Bachaalany Aug 3 '10 at 11:22

You could use the @contextmanager decorator in the contextlib module along with a with statement for something along these lines:

from contextlib import contextmanager

class test1(object):
    def mybefore(self):
        print "before func call"
    def myafter(self):
        print "after func call"

@contextmanager
def wrapper(cls):
    test = cls()
    test.mybefore()
    try:
        yield
    finally:
        test.myafter()

def f1(a1, a2):
    print "f1(a1=%d, a2=%d)" % (a1, a2)

with wrapper(test1):
    f1(1, 2)
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