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#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
    unsigned char i=0x80;
    printf("%d",i<<1);
    return 0;
}

Why does this program print 256?

As I understand this, since 0x80= 0b10000000, and unsigned char has 8 bits, the '1' should overflow after left shift and the output should be 0, not 256.

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2  
Don't want to post as an answer because I'm not 100% sure, but isn't it because %d is an integer? So, the code behind the scenes probably assigns i<<1 to an integer to print it, which means that it fits and doesn't overflow. Try doing printf("%c", i<<1);? –  Stephen Jul 30 '10 at 16:45
    
@Stephen: Should have posted the answer ;) –  KevenK Jul 30 '10 at 16:50
    
@Stephen:The output is blank when I use %c. –  Variance Jul 30 '10 at 16:52
    
Oh well, I guess I was sort of on the right track. Sorry %c didn't work - I didn't have a compiler to hand to check it! –  Stephen Jul 30 '10 at 16:53
    
On most compilers, i << n will produce an integer, regardless of the original type. –  Brian S Jul 30 '10 at 16:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

This is a result of C's integer promotion rules. Essentially, most any variable going into an expression is "promoted" so that operations like this do not lose precision. Then, it's pased as an int into printf, according to C's variable arguments rules.

If you'd want what you're looking for, you'd have to cast back to unsigned char:

#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
    unsigned char i=0x80;
    printf("%d",((unsigned char)(i<<1)));
    return 0;
}

Note: using %c as specified in Stephen's comment won't work because %c expects an integer too.

EDIT: Alternately, you could do this:

#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
    unsigned char i=0x80;
    unsigned char res = i<<1;
    printf("%d",res);
    return 0;
}

or

#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
    unsigned char i=0x80;
    printf("%d",(i<<1) & 0xFF);
    return 0;
}
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+1 for completeness. –  R.. Jul 30 '10 at 16:56
    
Could you cast (i<<1) to unsigned char? –  nmichaels Jul 30 '10 at 17:11
    
@Nathon: Isn't that what I did? –  Billy ONeal Jul 30 '10 at 17:32
    
Weird, I must have my blinders turned on. –  nmichaels Jul 30 '10 at 18:58
    
Thank you.&#173; –  Variance Jul 31 '10 at 9:17

Don't forget the format specifically for printing unsigned.

printf("%u",(unsigned char)(i<<1));
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