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There are 10,000 items in a list and the user needs to be able to select a portion of these based on whatever criteria, and then put them into a group. So as the user, I filter the list of these 10,000 items based on whatever, hit select all and then click "Group".

I'm trying to come up with the most efficient method of linking these all together.

If I have item_table and group_table and then group_has_item, I'd effectively have to INSERT 1,000 rows at one time into the group_has_item table. Is there an efficient way to do this? Or is there a better schema? The only requirement is that these items have to be able to be tied to multiple groups at once.

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So are these criteria fixed or can the user add arbitrary items to a grooup? –  NullUserException Jul 30 '10 at 18:24
    
Can a single item belong to multiple groups? –  NullUserException Jul 30 '10 at 18:25
    
A single item can belong to multiple groups and the criteria are not fixed. Basically it's allowing the user to create lists of items with certain criteria. –  Chris Jul 30 '10 at 18:28
    
If you are concerned about performance of 1000s of INSERTs, you can reduce the load by running prepared statements with params or joining several inserts in one query, –  andr Jul 30 '10 at 18:32
    
andr - can you give me an example of a "prepared statement with params" that would work in this situation? Is the performance of a 1000 joined inserts that much better than 1000 separate insert statements if they're sent in the same batch? –  Chris Jul 30 '10 at 18:34

1 Answer 1

If I have item_table and group_table and then group_has_item, I'd effectively have to INSERT 1,000 rows at one time into the group_has_item table. Is there an efficient way to do this?

Yes - what you describe is the proper way to associate the records.
It's called a many-to-many relationship, and uses a table for holding these relationships. Some call the table linking the two entities map, lookup, xref... I've forgotten some of the synonyms.

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Just to add to that, performance is not an issue here if you select your data types and indexes appropriately. –  NullUserException Jul 30 '10 at 18:26
    
Yeah, I know that I described a standard a many to many relationship - but I'm wondering if there's a better way since I'm trying to establish these relationships with huge numbers of things at random. –  Chris Jul 30 '10 at 18:29
    
Performance isn't an issue with issuing 1000 insert statements at once? –  Chris Jul 30 '10 at 18:31
    
@Chris: many-to-many is the best solution if you want to perform any sort of relational integrity, reporting... Honestly, how often do you see 1,000 inserts happening? –  OMG Ponies Jul 30 '10 at 18:35
    
Agreed - you can work on the performance issues, but this is the right way to represent the relationships. –  Scott Saunders Jul 30 '10 at 18:37

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