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HI, I am working on a simple class to combine items of any type... this is for a poker game, this is how it looks:

public static List<List<T>> combinar<T>(List<T> items, int take)
{
    List<List<T>> combs = new List<List<T>>();
    var stuff = permutar<T>(items, take);

    var all = from s in stuff
                select new Tuple<List<T>, string>(s, String.Join("", s.OrderBy(c => c).Select(c => c.ToString())));
    var strs = all.Select(s => s.Item2).Distinct();
    foreach (var str in strs)
    {
        combs.Add(all.First(a => a.Item2 == str).Item1);
    }
    return combs;
}
public static List<List<T>> permutar<T>(List<T> list, int take)
{
    List<List<T>> combs = new List<List<T>>();
    foreach (var item in list)
    {
        var newlist = list.Where(i => !i.Equals(item)).ToList();
        var returnlist = take <= 1 ? new List<List<T>> { new List<T>() } : permutar(newlist, take - 1);
        foreach (var l in returnlist)
        {
            l.Add(item);
        }
        combs.AddRange(returnlist);
    }

    return combs;
}

so permutation works perfect.. but I am having some trouble with combination, when T is Card it takes hell lots of time to complete... so my question is how to select distinct lists form the result of permutation???

this is the Card Class:

public class Card : IComparable
{
    Suite _Suite;
    public Suite Suite
    {
        get { return _Suite; }
        set { _Suite = value; }
    }
    Grade _Grade;
    public Grade Grade
    {
        get { return _Grade; }
        set { _Grade = value; }
    }
    string _symbol;
    public string Symbol
    {
       //stuff
    }
    public PictureBox Picture
    {
        //stuff
    }
    public override string ToString()
    {
        return _Grade.ToString() + " " + _Suite.ToString();
    }
    public int CompareTo(object obj)
    {
        Card card = (Card)obj;
        return card.Grade > this.Grade ? -1 : card.Grade < this.Grade ? 1 : 0;
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
You might want to look at auto-implemented properties: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb384054.aspx –  Mark Byers Jul 30 '10 at 18:48
    
It seems to me that what you really want is an efficient method for generating combinations. –  Mark Byers Jul 30 '10 at 18:49
1  
I think you might be better served by implementing this the other way around. Instead of finding all the permutations and then deduplicating them to get the combinations, it would make more sense to get all the combinations and then for each combination find all the permutations of that combination. –  mquander Jul 30 '10 at 18:50
    
is this line: return card.Grade > this.Grade ? -1 : card.Grade > this.Grade ? 0 : 1; How it's written in your code? or is it written with at least one less than (<)? –  AllenG Jul 30 '10 at 18:55
    
you all are right... actually trying to get a comb. algorithm I got to the permutation algorithm, but it is fast (perm.), and yes I want a more efficient way to combine and the key may be in finding the distinct in a more efficient way –  Luiscencio Jul 30 '10 at 18:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Assuming you don't want to make any big algorithmic changes, your biggest problem here is

combs.Add(all.First().Item1);

That doesn't make any sense. Perhaps you meant

combs.Add(all.First(c => c.Item2 == str)).Item1);

However, that would be very slow; if that's what you want, you should put the results of all into a hash table keyed by the string, and use that instead of looping through Distinct results.

If you wanted to get combinations without computing permutations first, the way to do it would be like this. Given some objects, to find the combinations of length K: if K is 0, return the empty list. Else, for each object, take that object, and then recursively append all the K-minus-1-length combinations of the rest of the objects.

share|improve this answer
    
sorry i was doing it this way but modified it to try something and then forgot to undo to post... already edited the original post... I'll try the hash way... and postback... –  Luiscencio Jul 30 '10 at 19:00
    
looks like the hashtable way is quite fast, but I am having problems casting it back to a List<List<T>>... –  Luiscencio Jul 30 '10 at 21:08
    
+1 ahahaha done!!! I was doing t.Cast<List<T>>() but it should be t.Values.Cast<List<T>>() now it is fast enough... now I just have to testit on slow machines... thanks for your advice =) –  Luiscencio Jul 30 '10 at 21:13

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