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I have been hearing a lot about Project Euler so I thought I solve one of the problems in C#. The problem as stated on the website is as follows:

If we list all the natural numbers below 10 that are multiples of 3 or 5, we get 3, 5, 6 and 9. The sum of these multiples is 23.

Find the sum of all the multiples of 3 or 5 below 1000.

I wrote my code as follows:

  class EulerProblem1
    {
        public static void Main()
        {
            var totalNum = 1000;
            var counter = 1;
            var sum = 0;

            while (counter < totalNum)
            {
                if (DivisibleByThreeOrFive(counter))
                    sum += counter;

                counter++;
            }

            Console.WriteLine("Total Sum: {0}", sum);
            Console.ReadKey();
        }

        private static bool DivisibleByThreeOrFive(int counter)
        {
            return ((counter % 3 == 0) || (counter % 5 == 0));

        }
    } 

It will be great to get some ideas on alternate implementations with less verbosity/cleaner syntax and better optimizations. The ideas may vary from quick and dirty to bringing out the cannon to annihilate the mosquito. The purpose is to explore the depths of computer science while trying to improve this particularly trivial code snippet.

Thanks

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2  
You used the ternary operator for a return from a bool method, just remove the ? and everything after it and it does the same thing. This is one of those strange things devs so often overlook without realizing it for some reason :) –  Jimmy Hoffa Jul 30 '10 at 19:54
1  
@Jimmy Hoffa: that is one of my major pet peeves... it's even worse when the expression to the left of the ? is a boolean being compared == true :) –  rmeador Jul 30 '10 at 20:02
    
@rmeador - Point well taken. Edited post. –  sc_ray Jul 30 '10 at 20:12
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11 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

With LINQ (updated as suggested in comments)

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var total = Enumerable.Range(0,1000)
                    .Where(counter => (counter%3 == 0) || (counter%5 == 0))
                    .Sum();

    Console.WriteLine(total);
    Console.ReadKey();
}
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It is opaque that Seq returns a sequence from 0-1000. Why not make that explicit? Have a method Seq(int start, int elements) that counts from start to start+elements. Of course, were you to do that then you could simply use Enumerable.Range, which does exactly that. :-) –  Eric Lippert Jul 30 '10 at 19:47
    
Thank you Eric, forgot about Enumerable.Range :) –  Russ Cam Jul 30 '10 at 19:53
    
I was trying to use Euler to learn LINQ and this is exactly what I came up with (diff variable names of course). :) –  Mayo Jul 30 '10 at 20:21
    
After your change your program no longer produces the correct answer; it will be off by 1000. Do you see why? It's because you trusted my incorrect description of Enumerable.Range instead of reading the documentation. Enumerable.Range does not count to start + elements, it counts to start + elements - 1. You took correct code and you broke it by trying to make it look nicer. A classic mistake. –  Eric Lippert Jul 30 '10 at 21:23
1  
@sc_ray - The common multiples aren't double counted, they are only counted once as the range is enumerated once –  Russ Cam Aug 1 '10 at 9:52
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Updated to not double count numbers that are multiples of both 3 and 5:

int EulerProblem(int totalNum)
{
   int a = (totalNum-1)/3;
   int b = (totalNum-1)/5;
   int c = (totalNum-1)/15;
   int d = a*(a+1)/2;
   int e = b*(b+1)/2;
   int f = c*(c+1)/2;
   return 3*d + 5*e - 15*f;
}
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1  
Would you not sum the numbers divisible by 3 and by 5 twice? –  Frank Jul 30 '10 at 19:24
1  
I don't think this would work--you appear to be double-counting the numbers divisible by 15. It does suggest a more efficient procedure, though. –  Loren Pechtel Jul 30 '10 at 19:25
    
@Loren and @Frank - I see what you're saying. I guess it's ambiguous as to whether or not you should consider the multiples of 3 and 5 separately or not. I'll see if I can edit to remove the duplicates. –  mbeckish Jul 30 '10 at 19:28
    
This is not correct. –  ChaosPandion Jul 30 '10 at 19:34
    
@Jordão - Oops. Thanks. –  mbeckish Jul 30 '10 at 19:34
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Here's a transliteration of my original F# solution into C#. Edited: It's basically mbeckish's solution as a loop rather than a function (and I remove the double count). I like mbeckish's better.

static int Euler1 ()
{
  int sum = 0;

  for (int i=3; i<1000; i+=3) sum+=i;
  for (int i=5; i<1000; i+=5) sum+=i;
  for (int i=15; i<1000; i+=15) sum-=i;

  return sum;
}

Here's the original:

let euler1 d0 d1 n =
  (seq {d0..d0..n}       |> Seq.sum) +
  (seq {d1..d1..n}       |> Seq.sum) -
  (seq {d0*d1..d0*d1..n} |> Seq.sum)

let result = euler1 3 5 (1000-1)
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This is a really elegant solution. I hadn't thought to just compute the total sum and subtract the overlap. Nice. –  T.K. Jul 30 '10 at 19:34
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I haven't written any Java in a while, but this should solve it in constant time with little overhead:

public class EulerProblem1
{
    private static final int EULER1 = 233168;
    // Equal to the sum of all natural numbers less than 1000
    // which are multiples of 3 or 5, inclusive.

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        System.out.println(EULER1);
    }
}

EDIT: Here's a C implementation, if every instruction counts:

#define STDOUT     1
#define OUT_LENGTH 8

int main (int argc, char **argv)
{
    const char out[OUT_LENGTH] = "233168\n";
    write(STDOUT, out, OUT_LENGTH);
}

Notes:

  • There's no error handling on the call to write. If true robustness is needed, a more sophisticated error handling strategy must be employed. Whether the added complexity is worth greater reliability depends on the needs of the user.
  • If you have memory constraints, you may be able to save a byte by using a straight char array rather than a string terminated by a superfluous null character. In practice, however, out would almost certainly be padded to 8 bytes anyway.
  • Although the declaration of the out variable could be avoided by placing the string inline in the write call, any real compiler willoptimize away the declaration.
  • The write syscall is used in preference to puts or similar to avoid the additional overhead. Theoretically, you could invoke the system call directly, perhaps saving a few cycles, but this would raise significant portability issues. Your mileage may vary regarding whether this is an acceptable tradeoff.
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How does this perform compared to the command line execution: echo 233168 ? I'd like to know the ticks if you could, thanks. –  Jimmy Hoffa Jul 30 '10 at 20:14
    
With the JVM overhead, echo's probably faster. On the other hand, if performance is super-critical, you could implement the program in C and beat echo handily. I'll update the original answer. –  Thom Smith Jul 30 '10 at 20:22
    
+1 for taking the time to detail this. Might I also suggest naming the compiled binary 'a' to ensure even the time to get it to execute is as quick as possible, to magnify the efficiency in the execution time. –  Jimmy Hoffa Jul 30 '10 at 20:39
    
I bet echo will be faster than any C implementation since it's a shell built-in. –  Axel Jul 30 '10 at 21:43
    
Really? I thought it was just a short program. –  Thom Smith Jul 30 '10 at 21:49
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Refactoring @mbeckish's very clever solution:

public int eulerProblem(int max) {
    int t1 = f(max, 3);
    int t2 = f(max, 5);
    int t3 = f(max, 3 * 5);
    return t1 + t2 - t3;
}

private int f(int max, int n) {
    int a = (max - 1) / n;
    return n * a * (a + 1) / 2;
}
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That's basically the same way I did that problem. I know there were other solutions (probably more efficient ones too) on the forums for project-euler.

Once you input your answer going back to the question gives you the option to go to the forum for that problem. You may want to look there!

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The code in DivisibleByThreeOrFive would be slightly faster if you would state it as follows:

return ((counter % 3 == 0) || (counter % 5 == 0));

And if you do not want to rely on the compiler to inline the function call, you could do this yourself by putting this code into the Main routine.

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1  
I rather doubt it would be faster. The jitter is smart enough to optimize away the excessively verbose code. The reason to eliminate this is because the verbosity is unnecessary; it adds no value. –  Eric Lippert Jul 30 '10 at 19:45
    
@Eric - True. It was a rookie move to put the ternary in there. I have edited my post. Thanks. –  sc_ray Jul 30 '10 at 20:19
    
haha... micro optimisation again... Has anyone tried return ((counter % 3) * (counter % 5) == 0); already? Might be even faster on some processors... –  Axel Jul 30 '10 at 21:48
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You can come up with a closed form solution for this. The trick is to look for patterns. Try listing out the terms in the sum up to say ten, or twenty and then using algebra to group them. By making appropriate substitutions you can generalize that to numbers other than ten. Just be careful about edge cases.

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Try this, in C. It's constant time, and there's only one division (two if the compiler doesn't optimize the div/mod, which it should). I'm sure it's possible to make it a bit more obvious, but this should work.

It basically divides the sum into two parts. The greater part (for N >= 15) is a simple quadratic function that divides N into exact blocks of 15. The lesser part is the last bit that doesn't fit into a block. The latter bit is messier, but there are only a few possibilities, so a LUT will solve it in no time.

const unsigned long N = 1000 - 1;
const unsigned long q = N / 15;
const unsigned long r = N % 15;
const unsigned long rc = N - r;

unsigned long sum = ((q * 105 + 15) * q) >> 1;

switch (r) {
    case 3  : sum += 3  + 1*rc ; break;
    case 4  : sum += 3  + 1*rc ; break;
    case 5  : sum += 8  + 2*rc ; break;
    case 6  : sum += 14 + 3*rc ; break;
    case 7  : sum += 14 + 3*rc ; break;
    case 8  : sum += 14 + 3*rc ; break;
    case 9  : sum += 23 + 4*rc ; break;
    case 10 : sum += 33 + 5*rc ; break;
    case 11 : sum += 33 + 5*rc ; break;
    case 12 : sum += 45 + 6*rc ; break;
    case 13 : sum += 45 + 6*rc ; break;
    case 14 : sum += 45 + 6*rc ; break;
}
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You can do something like this:

Func<int,int> Euler = total=> 
    new List<int>() {3,5}
        .Select(m => ((int) (total-1) / m) * m * (((int) (total-1) / m) + 1) / 2)
        .Aggregate( (T, m) => T+=m);

You still have the double counting problem. I'll think about this a little more.

Edit:

Here is a working (if slightly inelegant) solution in LINQ:

        var li = new List<int>() { 3, 5 };
        Func<int, int, int> Summation = (total, m) => 
           ((int) (total-1) / m) * m * (((int) (total-1) / m) + 1) / 2;

        Func<int,int> Euler = total=> 
            li
                .Select(m => Summation(total, m))
                .Aggregate((T, m) => T+=m)
            - Summation(total, li.Aggregate((T, m) => T*=m));

Can any of you guys improve on this?

Explanation:

Remember the summation formula for a linear progression is n(n+1)/2. In the first case where you have multiples of 3,5 < 10, you want Sum(3+6+9,5). Setting total=10, you make a sequence of the integers 1 .. (int) (total-1)/3, and then sum the sequence and multiply by 3. You can easily see that we're just setting n=(int) (total-1)/3, then using the summation formula and multiplying by 3. A little algebra gives us the formula for the Summation functor.

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I like technielogys idea, here's my idea of a modification

static int Euler1 () 
{ 
  int sum = 0; 

  for (int i=3; i<1000; i+=3) 
  {
    if (i % 5 == 0) continue;
    sum+=i; 
  }
  for (int i=5; i<1000; i+=5) sum+=i; 

  return sum; 
} 

Though also comes to mind is maybe a minor heuristic, does this make any improvement?

static int Euler1 () 
{ 
  int sum = 0; 

  for (int i=3; i<1000; i+=3) 
  {
    if (i % 5 == 0) continue;
    sum+=i; 
  }
  for (int i=5; i<250; i+=5)
  {
    sum+=i;
  }
  for (int i=250; i<500; i+=5)
  {
    sum+=i;
    sum+=i*2;
    sum+=(i*2)+5;
  }

  return sum; 
} 
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If nobody else is going to make a judgement, I will, I declare these modifications are sequentially more efficient than their predecessors! I win! –  Jimmy Hoffa Jul 30 '10 at 20:51
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