Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Is there any [non programming language specific] way to get hex versions of object identifiers?

ex:

OID 1.2.840.10040.4.1: dsa

hex string = 2a 86 48 ce 38 04 01

there doesnt seem to be an easy to access list for them. im looking for the OIDs used in X509 certificates

share|improve this question
up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can use CryptEncodeObjectEx to decode the most cryptographic objects inclusive OIDs.

In case of OIDs the encoding and decoding is pity simple so you can do this manually.

Two first numbers 1.2 will be encoded with a little special way. For example x.y will be encoded as 40*x+y. In case of 1.2 we have 40*1+2 = 42 or 0x2a.

All next characters will be interpret as 7-bit numbers where the highest bit (bit number 7 if we start with 0) is 0 is the byte is the last one and 1 if the bit is not the last one. For example, 840 is 0x348. To encode this we should use 2 bytes in the last one will be saved 0x48. In the previous one should be saved 0x3 with an additional bit from 0x48 (because of 7 bit codding and not 8 bit encoding). So we should encode 0x3*2=0x6 in the first byte. Because 0x6 will be the not the last byte in the encoding of the integer (0x48 byte will follow) we should add 0x80 to the encoded value. So we receive 0x80+0x6=0x86. So 840 will be encoded as 0x86 and 0x48.

In the same way 10040 is 0x2738. The last byte is 0x38 and the first one is 0x27*2 (because of 7 bit codding): 0x27*2=0x4e. Because 0x4e is not the last byte we should add 0x80 to the encoded value: 0x4e+0x80=0xce. So 10040 will be encoded as two bytes 0xce and 0x38.

The 4 and 1 will be encoded just as 0x04 and 0x01.

So 1.2.840.10040.4.1 should be encoded as 2a 86 48 ce 38 04 01 like you already knows.

All this you can read in 8.19 of ITU-T X.690 (ISO/IEC 8825-1)

UPDATED based on the comment: Something is wrong in you encoding/decoding program. The OID "1.2.840.113549.1.1.1" will be do represented as 2A 86 48 86 F7 0D 01 01 01 and not as 2a 86 48 83 f6 8d 01 01 01 like you wrote. To verify this you can use following small C program:

#define STRICT
#include <windows.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <tchar.h>

#pragma comment (lib, "Crypt32.lib")

void PrintOffset(DWORD dwMargineOffset)
{
    while (dwMargineOffset--)
        _tprintf (TEXT(" "));
}

void HexDump (PBYTE pData, DWORD dwDataLength)
{
    while (dwDataLength--) {
        _tprintf (TEXT("%02X"), *pData++);
        if (dwDataLength) _tprintf (TEXT(" "));
    }
}

void DumpOID (DWORD dwMargineOffset, PBYTE pData, DWORD dwDataLength)
{
    PCCRYPT_OID_INFO pCryptOidInfo;
    DWORD dw, i;
    char szOID[256];
    // i
    // first byte is encoded as x.y 40*x+y = 43 = 0x2B
    //
    //_tprintf(TEXT("%d.%d"), *pData/40, *pData%40);
    i = wsprintfA (szOID, "%d.%d", *pData/40, *pData%40);
    dwDataLength--;
    pData++;

    while (dwDataLength--) {
        if (*pData & 0x80) {
            dw = 0;
#pragma warning(disable:4127)
            while (TRUE) {
#pragma warning(default:4127)
                dw <<= 7;  // *128
                dw += (*pData & 0x7F);
                if (*pData++ & 0x80)
                    dwDataLength--;
                else
                    break;
            }
            //_tprintf(TEXT(".%d"), dw);
            i += wsprintfA (szOID+i, ".%d", dw);
        }
        else
            //_tprintf(TEXT(".%d"), *pData++);
            i += wsprintfA (szOID+i, ".%d", *pData++);
    }

    PrintOffset(dwMargineOffset);
    _tprintf (TEXT("%hs"), szOID);

    // try find OID in the list of known IODs
    pCryptOidInfo = CryptFindOIDInfo (CRYPT_OID_INFO_OID_KEY, szOID, 0);
    if (pCryptOidInfo)
        _tprintf (TEXT(" (\"%ls\")"), pCryptOidInfo->pwszName);
    else
        _tprintf (TEXT(" (Unknown OID)"));
}

int main()
{
    BOOL bIsSuccess;
    DWORD cbEncoded = 0;
    PBYTE pbyData = NULL;
    BYTE byData[] = {0x2a, 0x86, 0x48, 0x83, 0xf6, 0x8d, 0x01, 0x01, 0x01};
    BYTE byData2[] = {0x2a, 0x86, 0x48, 0x86, 0xf7, 0x0d, 0x01, 0x01, 0x01};
    LPSTR pszOid = "1.2.840.113549.1.1.1";
    DumpOID (0, byData, sizeof(byData));
    _tprintf (TEXT("\n"));
    DumpOID (0, byData2, sizeof(byData2));
    _tprintf (TEXT("\n"));

    bIsSuccess = CryptEncodeObjectEx (PKCS_7_ASN_ENCODING | X509_ASN_ENCODING,
                                      X509_OBJECT_IDENTIFIER,
                                      (const void *)&pszOid,
                                      CRYPT_ENCODE_ALLOC_FLAG,
                                      NULL,
                                      &pbyData,
                                      &cbEncoded);
    if (bIsSuccess) {
        HexDump (pbyData, cbEncoded);
        _tprintf (TEXT("\n"));
        pbyData = (PBYTE) LocalFree (pbyData);
    }

    return 0;
}

The program produce the following output 06 09 2A 86 48 86 F7 0D 01 01 01 where the first byte 0x06 of the BER encoding mean OID data type, the next byte 0x09 means the data length and next 9 bytes 2A 86 48 86 F7 0D 01 01 01 are the encoded OID 1.2.840.113549.1.1.1.

The full output of the program is

1.2.840.8226433.1.1 (Unknown OID)
1.2.840.113549.1.1.1 ("RSA")
06 09 2A 86 48 86 F7 0D 01 01 01
share|improve this answer
    
thank you so much! – calccrypto Aug 4 '10 at 1:36
    
wait. no how would this expand to 3 bytes? like "1.2.840.113549.1.1.1"? im getting '2a864883f68d010101' rather than '2a864886f70d010101' – calccrypto Aug 5 '10 at 3:23
3  
how would the calculation look manually for '113549'? – calccrypto Aug 5 '10 at 18:07
    
Instead of that I posted a code which convert binary representation of OID in the dotted string form. – Oleg Aug 5 '10 at 18:39

You have explained how to make convertion for values between 0 to 65536 (0xFFFF).

Could you explain your calculation for higher values ? like 113549 ?

share|improve this answer
    
just do the same thing for all the high bytes, the code shows it. Set the highest bit to 1, and put seven bits of the value in it. – davenpcj Dec 8 '12 at 5:32
    
113549 encodes as 0x86 0xF7 0x0D. – davenpcj Dec 8 '12 at 5:43

I finally got it. Thank you. I wrote the sequence of for RSA encoding. (when RSADSI is 113549)

113549 is 1bb8d(Hexa)

as binary format, 1bb8d is 0001 1011 1011 1000 1001.

it is 7 bit encoding, so expressed as

00 0110 | 111 0111 | 000 1001

=> 0x06 | 0x77 | 0x0d

=> 0x06+0x80|0x77+0x80|0x0d

=> 0x86 0xf7 0x0d

====================================

0x86 | 0xf7 | 0x0d

share|improve this answer

For 113549

Hexa: 1bb8d

binary: 0001 1011 1011 1000 1101

Step 1: Create group with 7 bits:

*0*0001 10 |11 1011 1 |000 1101

Step 2: Add extra bit for 8 bits (0 added into only right most byte and 1 added into all other bytes):

*1*000 0110 | *1*111 0111 | *0*000 1101

Step3: Convert binary to hexadecimal:

0x86 | 0xf7 | 0x0d

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.