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Am I missing something? How do I set a default value in Doctrine 2?

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4  
@ORM\Column(name="foo", type="decimal", precision=7, scale=2, options={"default" = 0}) works (from the non-popular answer below) –  WayFarer Aug 21 '12 at 14:01
1  
@ORM\Column(name="is_activated", type="boolean",options={"default":0}) OR @ORM\Column(name="is_activated", type="boolean",options={"default"= 0}) –  ahmed hamdy Nov 19 '13 at 15:10
    
Ahmed this doesn't seem to work for booleans in Symfony 2.3. However options={"default" = "0"}) does work, putting the integer in quotes. –  Acyra Mar 7 at 15:23
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11 Answers

up vote 142 down vote accepted

Database default values are not "portably" supported. The only way to use database default values is through the columnDefinition mapping attribute where you specify the SQL snippet (DEFAULT cause inclusive) for the column the field is mapped to.

You can use:

<?php
/**
 * @Entity
 */
class myEntity {
    /**
     * @var string
     *
     * @Column(name="myColumn", type="string", length="50")
     */
    private $myColumn = 'myDefaultValue';
    ...
}

PHP-level default values are preferred as these are also properly available on newly created and persisted objects (Doctrine will not go back to the database after persisting a new object to get the default values).

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but there is a problem here : What if I set a "datetime" type? –  artragis Sep 11 '12 at 9:04
9  
@artragis put your instanciation in the entity constructor –  Alain Tiemblo Sep 29 '12 at 17:52
3  
Care has to be taken with migrations using this approach as any existing rows will cause the migration to fail. –  Tamlyn Oct 29 '13 at 14:44
    
@Tamlyn Do you mean that if you add a new column, the migration won't set this default value to the pre-existing rows, or something else? I think it's always sensible to set the value of a new column manually in your migration, unless they want to be null. It's possible existing rows will want a special value, not the default value for new rows. –  rjmunro Feb 14 at 14:23
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@ORM\Column(name="foo", type="decimal", precision=7, scale=2, options={"default" = 0})
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2  
Good catch! It seems there are no options={"default" = 0} option in official documentation –  WayFarer Aug 21 '12 at 13:57
1  
FYI, the options parameter is also useful for unsigned values. see this answer –  yvoyer Jan 8 '13 at 18:55
    
Very nice! This is very useful in addition to having defaults in PHP (as per the accepted answer) when you are migrating between model versions and don't want pre-existing entities to get a null value for a newly-added field! –  Ezequiel Muns Apr 17 '13 at 5:40
    
Does not support booleans. Also, may disappear in further Doctrine versions. –  wdev Jul 2 '13 at 12:49
    
@wdev it supports booleans just fine with Doctrine 2.4 on Postgresql 8+ –  ChrisR Dec 18 '13 at 9:22
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Set up a constructor in your entity and set the default value there.

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This certainly seems like the logical approach. Has anyone run into issues with setting up defaults in the constructor? –  cantera Nov 1 '11 at 11:16
14  
Doctrine's recommended solution: doctrine-project.org/docs/orm/2.1/en/reference/faq.html –  cantera Nov 1 '11 at 11:16
    
@cantera25 that should be the answer +1 –  Phill Pafford Dec 12 '12 at 21:17
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Use:

options={"default":"foo bar"}

and not:

options={"default"="foo bar"}

For instance:

/**
* @ORM\Column(name="foo", type="smallint", options={"default":0})
*/
private $foo
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the workaround i used was a LifeCycleCallback. still waiting if there is any more "native" method ... eg. @Column(type="string", default="hello default value")

/**
 * @Entity @Table(name="posts") @HasLifeCycleCallbacks
 */
class Post implements Node, \Zend_Acl_Resource_Interface {

...

/**
 * @PrePersist
 */
function onPrePersist() {
    // set default date
    $this->dtPosted = date('Y-m-d H:m:s');
}
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Here is how i solved it for myself. Entity example with default value for MySQL.

But, this also requires to setup a constructor in your entity and set the default value there.

Entity\Example:
  type: entity
  table: example
  fields:
    id:
      type: integer
      id: true
      generator:
        strategy: AUTO
    label:
      type: string
      columnDefinition: varchar(255) NOT NULL DEFAULT 'default_value' COMMENT 'This is column comment'
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With this line in my config Doctrine tries to drop the default on the column everytime I run. php app/console doctrine:schema:update –  shapeshifter Jun 3 '13 at 0:27
    
This is the worst answer here. columnDefinition goes directly agains the purpose of having an ORM, which is abstraction from the database. This solution will break portability, will keep your software dependant on your DB vendor and will also break Doctrine Migrations tools. –  Pedro Cordeiro Feb 25 at 14:30
    
@PedroCordeiro I completely agree with you. This is just a fast solution until another issue rises. –  Putna Feb 27 at 15:40
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Adding to @romanb brilliant answer.

This adds a little overhead in migration, because you obviously cannot create a field with not null constraint and with no default value.

// this up() migration is autogenerated, please modify it to your needs
$this->abortIf($this->connection->getDatabasePlatform()->getName() != "postgresql");

//lets add property without not null contraint        
$this->addSql("ALTER TABLE tablename ADD property BOOLEAN");

//get the default value for property       
$object = new Object();
$defaultValue = $menuItem->getProperty() ? "true":"false";

$this->addSql("UPDATE tablename SET property = {$defaultValue}");

//not you can add constraint
$this->addSql("ALTER TABLE tablename ALTER property SET NOT NULL");

With this answer, I encourage you to think why do you need the default value in the database in the first place? And usually it is to allow creating objects with not null constraint.

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+1 its a big pain without default value for migrations. –  Venu Oct 1 '12 at 19:01
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If you use yaml definition for your entity, the following works for me on a postgresql database:

Entity\Entity_name:
    type: entity
    table: table_name
    fields: 
        field_name:
            type: boolean
            nullable: false
            options:
                default: false
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Work for me on mysql database also

Entity\Entity_name:
    type: entity
    table: table_name
    fields: 
        field_name:
            type: integer
            nullable: true
            options:
                default: 1
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Update

One more reason why read the documentation for Symfony will never go out of trend. There is a simple solution for my specific case and is to set the field type option empty_data to a default value.

Again, this solution is only for the scenario where an empty input in a form sets the DB field to null.

Background

None of the previous answers helped me with my specific scenario but I found a solution.

I had a form field that needed to behave as follow:

  1. Not required, could be left blank. (Used 'required' => false)
  2. If left blank, it should default to a given value. For better user experience, I did not set the default value on the input field but rather used the html attribute 'placeholder' since it is less obtrusive.

I then tried all the recommendations given in here. Let me list them:

  • Set a default value when for the entity property:
<?php
/**
 * @Entity
 */
class myEntity {
    /**
     * @var string
     *
     * @Column(name="myColumn", type="string", length="50")
     */
    private $myColumn = 'myDefaultValue';
    ...
}
  • Use the options annotation:
@ORM\Column(name="foo", options={"default":"foo bar"})
  • Set the default value on the constructor:
/**
 * @Entity
 */
class myEntity {
    ...
    public function __construct()
    {
        $this->myColumn = 'myDefaultValue';
    }
    ...
}
None of it worked and all because of how Symfony uses your Entity class.

IMPORTANT

Symfony form fields override default values set on the Entity class. Meaning, your schema for your DB can have a default value defined but if you leave a non-required field empty when submitting your form, the form->handleRequest() inside your form->isValid() method will override those default values on your Entity class and set them to the input field values. If the input field values are blank, then it will set the Entity property to null.

http://symfony.com/doc/current/book/forms.html#handling-form-submissions

My Workaround

Set the default value on your controller after form->handleRequest() inside your form->isValid() method:

...
if ($myEntity->getMyColumn() === null) {
    $myEntity->setMyColumn('myDefaultValue');
}
...

Not a beautiful solution but it works. I could probably make a validation group but there may be people that see this issue as a data transformation rather than data validation, I leave it to you to decide.


Note

I also tried to override the Entity setter this way:

...
/**
 * Set myColumn
 *
 * @param string $myColumn
 *
 * @return myEntity
 */
public function setMyColumn($myColumn)
{
    $this->myColumn = ($myColumn === null || $myColumn === '') ? 'myDefaultValue' : $myColumn;

    return $this;
}
...

This, even though it looks cleaner, it doesn't work. The reason being that the evil form->handleRequest() method does not use the Model's setter methods to update the data (dig into form->setData() for more details).

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I struggled with the same problem. I wanted to have the default value from the database into the entities (automatically). Guess what, I did it :)

<?php
/**
 * Created by JetBrains PhpStorm.
 * User: Steffen
 * Date: 27-6-13
 * Time: 15:36
 * To change this template use File | Settings | File Templates.
 */

require_once 'bootstrap.php';

$em->getConfiguration()->setMetadataDriverImpl(
    new \Doctrine\ORM\Mapping\Driver\DatabaseDriver(
        $em->getConnection()->getSchemaManager()
    )
);

$driver = new \Doctrine\ORM\Mapping\Driver\DatabaseDriver($em->getConnection()->getSchemaManager());
$driver->setNamespace('Models\\');

$em->getConfiguration()->setMetadataDriverImpl($driver);

$cmf = new \Doctrine\ORM\Tools\DisconnectedClassMetadataFactory();
$cmf->setEntityManager($em);
$metadata = $cmf->getAllMetadata();

// Little hack to have default values for your entities...
foreach ($metadata as $k => $t)
{
    foreach ($t->getFieldNames() as $fieldName)
    {
        $correctFieldName = \Doctrine\Common\Util\Inflector::tableize($fieldName);

        $columns = $tan = $em->getConnection()->getSchemaManager()->listTableColumns($t->getTableName());
        foreach ($columns as $column)
        {
            if ($column->getName() == $correctFieldName)
            {
                // We skip DateTime, because this needs to be a DateTime object.
                if ($column->getType() != 'DateTime')
                {
                    $metadata[$k]->fieldMappings[$fieldName]['default'] = $column->getDefault();
                }
                break;
            }
        }
    }
}

// GENERATE PHP ENTITIES!
$entityGenerator = new \Doctrine\ORM\Tools\EntityGenerator();
$entityGenerator->setGenerateAnnotations(true);
$entityGenerator->setGenerateStubMethods(true);
$entityGenerator->setRegenerateEntityIfExists(true);
$entityGenerator->setUpdateEntityIfExists(false);
$entityGenerator->generate($metadata, __DIR__);

echo "Entities created";
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