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what should try() function should have to get the output as 11 from the below program?

int main()
{
    int x = 10;
    try();
    printf("%d",x);
    return 0;
}

try()
{
    /* how to change x here?? */
}
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3 Answers 3

You need to pass a pointer to the memory location (a copy of the original pointer). Otherwise you are just modifying a copy of the original value which is gone when the function exits.

void Try( int *x );

int main( ... )
{
    int x = 10;
    Try( &x );
    /* ... */
}

void Try( int *x )
{
    *x = 11;
}
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yeah, but it needs to be. –  Ed S. Jul 31 '10 at 6:55
    
@Ronny: It doesn't need to be a pointer to pass it as one. The address of any variable in c++ is a pointer to that same variable. –  Mahmoud Al-Qudsi Jul 31 '10 at 6:56
    
@Ronny: Agreeing with Computer Guru. You can get a pointer to any variable by using the "&" symbol. int x = 10; int* pX = &x; *pX = 5; Now x will equal 5. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Jul 31 '10 at 7:05
    
@Yann: Ummm... I think you are missing something. You do know that int x is a pointer to int, right? int x and int *x are the same thing, and the latter follows the "declaration like use" idiom of C. (ok, I wish I knew how to escape an asterisk to avoid the italics, but you are wrong Yann) –  Ed S. Jul 31 '10 at 21:02
    
Formatting error, it seems; at least when I'm reading this, it looks like the asterisk is missing on the first line, but present at the definition (4th line from the end). It ought to be there for both. –  Yann Vernier Jul 31 '10 at 22:32
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To change the value of x from within a function, have try() take a pointer to the variable and change it there.

e.g.,

void try(int *x)
{
    *x = 11;
}

int main()
{
    int x = 10;
    try(&x);
    printf("%d",x);
    return 0;
}
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1  
Don't use pointers unless you have good reason to. Pass-by-reference does the job just as well. –  Mahmoud Al-Qudsi Jul 31 '10 at 6:58
17  
This is C code, not C++. References are not available. –  Jeff Mercado Jul 31 '10 at 6:59
4  
It was originally tagged as C so we shouldn't assume it is C++. –  Jeff Mercado Jul 31 '10 at 7:02
2  
@Computer Guru, Jeff M: Honestly, I agree with both of you. Although it can be confusing to a beginner, I think it is better to give more information rather than less. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Jul 31 '10 at 7:03
3  
If this WAS C++, it wouldn't compile anyhow. He named a function "try". That's a reserved word. Read the tags. –  Clark Gaebel Jul 31 '10 at 23:03
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The other answers are correct. The only way to truly change a variable inside another function is to pass it via pointer. Jeff M's example is the best, here.

If it doesn't really have to be that exact same variable, you can return the value from that function, and re-assign it to the variable, ala:

int try(int x)
{
  x = x + 1;
  return x;
}

int main()
{
  int x = 10;
  x = try(x);
  printf("%d",x);
  return 0;
}

Another option is to make it global (but don't do this very often - it is extremely messy!):

int x;

void try()
{
  x = 5;
}

int main()
{
  x = 10;
  try();
  printf("%d",x);
  return 0;
}
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Please note - since we're talking beginner tag, here - that try() needs to return x = x + 1; in the first example... –  Dan J Jul 31 '10 at 7:06
    
@djacobson: As in, since he's a beginner, my example should be correct? :) OK, fixed. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Jul 31 '10 at 7:19
    
+1 for providing many options for the solution. –  Praveen S Jul 31 '10 at 7:34
    
Personally I think there should probably not even be an assignment within that function. It alters only its argument, and assignments as expressions is a likely beginner pitfall. Notably that assignment has no effect on x in main(), only the return followed by handling the returned value does. –  Yann Vernier Jul 31 '10 at 8:31
    
@Yann Vernier: Sometimes there are good reasons to write functions like this example, though I understand if it would be confusing to a new programmer. If you're talking about what this example program could be, This whole program could be boiled down to a single line, with no variables: printf(%d", 5); Also, learning pointers is generally a huge sore point for new C programmers. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Jul 31 '10 at 9:45
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