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When we declare a variable, does the variable itself consume memory?

 class IHaveNothing
{
}

class IHaveNullFields
{
    string @string = null;
    StringBuilder @StringBuilder = null;
}

class Program
{      
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        IHaveNothing nothing = new IHaveNothing();
        IHaveNullFields nullFields = new IHaveNullFields();
    }
}

Does the instance nullFields consume more memories than the instance nothing ?

EDIT: How about null local variables as opposed to class' null fields, do they consume memory too?

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1  
I'd like to add that the amount of memory you're talking about is negligible. If the fields are null, there will be just a few bytes per instance per extra member. Unless you are creating millions of instances, or hundreds of fields, it's unlikely to have an impact on your project. –  Kieren Johnstone Jul 31 '10 at 15:03
    
Confusing question. You ask about variables but appear to talk about fields. –  Hans Passant Jul 31 '10 at 18:18
1  
@Hans: fields are variables. A variable is defined as a storage location. Fields are variables. Local variables are variables. Array elements are variables. If you can store data in it and change it, it's a variable. –  Eric Lippert Aug 1 '10 at 1:00
    
I never prefixed it with 'local'. That's a habit that's going to be mighty hard to lose :) –  Hans Passant Aug 1 '10 at 2:16
    
@Hans, Microsoft also use the term local for its technology such as implicitly-typed local variables. –  xport Aug 1 '10 at 9:39
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5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

A variable is defined as a storage location. So the question is: does a storage location consume memory?

When you say it that way it sounds obvious that the answer is yes. What else would a storage location do other than consume memory?

It's not as simple as that. A local variable can consume no memory at all; a local variable might be enregistered by the jitter. In that case it would consume neither stack nor heap memory.

Why do you care? The way that the CLR manages memory to make storage locations for variables is an implementation detail. Unless you're writing unsafe code, you don't have to worry about it.

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Let a collection of post office boxes be a memory. Each cell of the memory corresponds to a single post office box. Each office box has a unique address. If "a variable is defined as a storage location", it means a variable is analogous to a post office box or an address of a post office box? –  xport Aug 2 '10 at 12:40
    
@xport: Is a register a post office box in your analogy? What is its address? –  Eric Lippert Aug 17 '10 at 6:47
    
Q: "what else would a storage location do other than consume memory? A: It would use the aforementioned consumed memort to store something. –  phoog Feb 7 '11 at 14:08
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Yes, they consume the pointer size of the machine (at least).

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+1. It makes every instance of that particular class bigger by the pointer size. –  Steven Jul 31 '10 at 14:39
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IHaveNothing consumes 1 byte. It consumes a byte in order to ensure that the variable location is unique.

IHaveNullFields consumes the size of two pointers.

null local variables consume the size of a pointer.

You can use Marshall.SizeOf to determine the size of your classes. See http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/y3ybkfb3.aspx

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No, you cannot use Marshal.SizeOf to determine the size of your classes, because Marshal.SizeOf returns the size of the class after marshalling it, not as it is laid out in memory by the CLR. –  dtb Jul 31 '10 at 16:05
    
I'm also not sure why an instance of IHaveNothing should consume 1 byte. All CLR objects have an object header (8 bytes?), so I doubt there is any need for another byte if the class has no fields. –  dtb Jul 31 '10 at 16:21
2  
This is C++ thinking. A reference class always has the overhead of internal System.Object fields. –  Hans Passant Jul 31 '10 at 18:17
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For value types, the variable contains the value itself, but for reference types, the object goes onto the heap (the managed memory space) and the variable contains a reference pointing to the start of the block of memory used to hold the object.

The size of the pointer is determined by your system, on a 32-bit system, the reference pointer is 4 bytes, and for a 64-bit system the pointer will be 8 bytes.

Because reference types require this overhead per object, the recommendation is that for a type which you're likely to create many many times, such as the Point type used in any drawing program, you should make them value types using the struct keyword.

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I've previously been told, and I now agree with that critique, that one shouldn't make something a value or reference type because of where it will be stored or how many bytes it will occupy (these should be considered CLI implementation details and shouldn't affect your program design); what matters is the different equality and copying semantics of value and reference types. –  stakx Jul 31 '10 at 15:43
    
@stakx, there are some exceptions in cases where a type is used extremely frequently. For instance, the IEnumerator implementations for most of the BCL collection classes are mutable value types. This is for performance reasons, since the standard collections are frequently enumerated. Of course, since enumeration usually goes on behind the scenes via foreach, this usually keeps the user out of trouble. In general, though, it's better to use classes, particularly if the type is going to be mutable. If you plan to create a mutable value type, you should have a very good reason. –  Dan Bryant Jul 31 '10 at 18:02
    
There are other reasons why you would want to use immutable value types besides performance too. There are some benefits to using an immutable value type, Eric Lippert wrote an eleven part series on immutability which is well worth a read if you have the time (here's part one blogs.msdn.com/ericlippert/archive/2007/11/13/…). –  theburningmonk Jul 31 '10 at 19:50
    
@Dan, I agree that there are exceptions (there are always exceptions). (Concerning mutability vs. immutability, that's part of what I hinted at by saying "equality and copying semantics".) –  stakx Jul 31 '10 at 20:14
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use CLR Profiler to determine each type size at runtime

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