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Free function allocate_shared can be used with any standard compliant allocator. But what about shared_ptr's constructor and reset method.

template<class Y, class D, class A> shared_ptr(Y * p, D d, A a);
template<class Y, class D, class A> void reset(Y * p, D d, A a);

The manual says that D should provide a call operator which will be used to delete the pointer and A must be a standard compliant allocator. If so, why D is needed? Can't A do both allocation and delocation? Don't you think that the requirement to provide a deleter for every custom allocator makes the above methods pretty much useless? When I use custom allocators, I go for allocate_shared. How do I know what is the proper way to free memory allocated by a custom allocator?

EDIT: After some experimentation with a verbatim allocator and a deleter I figured out that the allocator passed to the constructor of shared_ptr and to the factory function allocate_shared is used to allocate the internal structure of shared_ptr only. allocate_shared never uses the passed allocator to allocate the shared object. I think that the boost manual could have explained how the allocator is used more explicitly.

share|improve this question
    
Part of the information here is not correct. allocate_shared uses the allocator not only for the shared_ptr control block, but also for the object itself! It utilizes allocator::rebind to get a "sibling allocator" that will allocate memory chunks large enough to hold the object along with its control block. –  Ferdinand Beyer May 7 '12 at 9:57

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The allocator is intended to be used to allocate and deallocate internal shared_ptr details, not the object.

That is, while the deleter gives us full control over our shared object (because we control how it's acquired and released), the allocator parameter gives us control over the internal details of our object's shared nature.

If you look at N2351, at the end of the allocator proposal they note that Boost has implemented the feature, and link to an example that was made to demonstrate its use.

Here is that example, verbatim:

#include <boost/config.hpp>

//  shared_ptr_alloc2_test.cpp
//
//  Copyright (c) 2005 Peter Dimov
//
// Distributed under the Boost Software License, Version 1.0. (See
// accompanying file LICENSE_1_0.txt or copy at
// http://www.boost.org/LICENSE_1_0.txt)


#include <boost/detail/lightweight_test.hpp>
#include <boost/shared_ptr.hpp>
#include <memory>
#include <cstddef>

// test_allocator

struct test_allocator_base
{
    int id_;

    static int last_global_id_;
    static int count_;

    explicit test_allocator_base( int id ): id_( id )
    {
    }
};

int test_allocator_base::last_global_id_ = 0;
int test_allocator_base::count_ = 0;

template<class T> class test_allocator: public test_allocator_base
{
public:

    typedef T * pointer;
    typedef T const * const_pointer;
    typedef T & reference;
    typedef T const & const_reference;
    typedef T value_type;
    typedef std::size_t size_type;
    typedef std::ptrdiff_t difference_type;

private:

    static T * last_pointer_;
    static std::size_t last_n_;
    static int last_id_;

public:

    template<class U> struct rebind
    {
        typedef test_allocator<U> other;
    };

    pointer address( reference r ) const
    {
        return &r;
    }

    const_pointer address( const_reference s ) const
    {
        return &s;
    }

    explicit test_allocator( int id = 0 ): test_allocator_base( id )
    {
    }

    template<class U> test_allocator( test_allocator<U> const & r ): test_allocator_base( r )
    {
    }

    template<class U> test_allocator & operator=( test_allocator<U> const & r )
    {
        test_allocator_base::operator=( r );
        return *this;
    }

    void deallocate( pointer p, size_type n )
    {
        BOOST_TEST( p == last_pointer_ );
        BOOST_TEST( n == last_n_ );
        BOOST_TEST( id_ == last_id_ );

        --count_;

        ::operator delete( p );
    }

    pointer allocate( size_type n, void const * )
    {
        T * p = static_cast< T* >( ::operator new( n * sizeof( T ) ) );

        last_pointer_ = p;
        last_n_ = n;
        last_id_ = id_;

        last_global_id_ = id_;
        ++count_;

        return p;
    }

    void construct( pointer p, T const & t )
    {
        new( p ) T( t );
    }

    void destroy( pointer p )
    {
        p->~T();
    }

    size_type max_size() const
    {
        return size_type( -1 ) / sizeof( T );
    }
};

template<class T> T * test_allocator<T>::last_pointer_ = 0;
template<class T> std::size_t test_allocator<T>::last_n_ = 0;
template<class T> int test_allocator<T>::last_id_ = 0;

template<class T, class U> inline bool operator==( test_allocator<T> const & a1, test_allocator<U> const & a2 )
{
    return a1.id_ == a2.id_;
}

template<class T, class U> inline bool operator!=( test_allocator<T> const & a1, test_allocator<U> const & a2 )
{
    return a1.id_ != a2.id_;
}

template<> class test_allocator<void>: public test_allocator_base
{
public:

    typedef void * pointer;
    typedef void const * const_pointer;
    typedef void value_type;

    template<class U> struct rebind
    {
        typedef test_allocator<U> other;
    };

    explicit test_allocator( int id = 0 ): test_allocator_base( id )
    {
    }

    template<class U> test_allocator( test_allocator<U> const & r ): test_allocator_base( r )
    {
    }

    template<class U> test_allocator & operator=( test_allocator<U> const & r )
    {
        test_allocator_base::operator=( r );
        return *this;
    }
};

//

struct X
{
    static int instances;

    X()
    {
        ++instances;
    }

    ~X()
    {
        --instances;
    }

private:

    X( X const & );
    X & operator=( X const & );
};

int X::instances = 0;

int main()
{
    BOOST_TEST( X::instances == 0 );

    boost::shared_ptr<void> pv( new X, boost::checked_deleter<X>(), std::allocator<X>() );

    BOOST_TEST( X::instances == 1 );

    pv.reset( new X, boost::checked_deleter<X>(), test_allocator<float>( 42 ) );

    BOOST_TEST( X::instances == 1 );

    BOOST_TEST( test_allocator_base::last_global_id_ == 42 );
    BOOST_TEST( test_allocator_base::count_ > 0 );

    pv.reset();

    BOOST_TEST( X::instances == 0 );
    BOOST_TEST( test_allocator_base::count_ == 0 );

    pv.reset( new X, boost::checked_deleter<X>(), test_allocator<void>( 43 ) );

    BOOST_TEST( X::instances == 1 );
    BOOST_TEST( test_allocator_base::last_global_id_ == 43 );

    pv.reset( new X, boost::checked_deleter<X>(), std::allocator<void>() );

    BOOST_TEST( X::instances == 1 );

    pv.reset();

    BOOST_TEST( X::instances == 0 );

    return boost::report_errors();
}
share|improve this answer
    
How about allocate_shared? Does it use the allocator to allocate both internals and the pointee? –  user401947 Aug 1 '10 at 6:25
    
@rn141: Nope, it just gives the shared_ptr the allocator you say. Basically, the non-allocator constructor is to make_shared as the allocator-constructor is to allocate_shared. –  GManNickG Aug 1 '10 at 6:41
    
Sorry, I don't get it. How allocate_shared uses the allocator passed as argument? Does allocate_shared uses it to allocate the pointee? Does allocate_shared use it to allocate reference count? You say that the deleter gives us full control over the shared object. But the manual says that the deleter is used only for deleting, not allocation. –  user401947 Aug 1 '10 at 15:42
    
@rn141: Do you get that the allocator is used for details, while the deleter deletes the object? allocate_shared just uses an allocator for the details instead of the default. And the deleter gives us full control because we can allocate the object our selves. –  GManNickG Aug 1 '10 at 19:23
    
I see it now. Thanks. I looked up the implementation file and the verbatim allocator confirmed what you said. It should have been clearly reflected in the manual. –  user401947 Aug 2 '10 at 11:47

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