Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Using instance methods as callbacks for event handlers changes the scope of this from "My instance" to "Whatever just called the callback". So my code looks like this

function MyObject() {
  this.doSomething = function() {
    ...
  }

  var self = this
  $('#foobar').bind('click', function(){
    self.doSomethng()
    // this.doSomething() would not work here
  })
}

It works, but is that the best way to do it? It looks strange to me.

share|improve this question
2  
You should avoid self as there is a window.self object and you could end up using that accidentally if you forget to declare your own self var (e.g. when moving some code around). This can be annoying to spot/debug. Better to use something like _this. –  Alastair Maw Sep 19 at 17:57

6 Answers 6

up vote 108 down vote accepted

This question is not specific to jQuery, but specific to JavaScript in general. The core problem is how to "channel" a variable in embedded functions. This is the example:

var abc = 1; // we want to use this variable in embedded functions

function xyz(){
  console.log(abc); // it is available here!
  function qwe(){
    console.log(abc); // it is available here too!
  }
  ...
};

This technique relies on using a closure. But it doesn't work with this because this is a pseudo variable that may change from scope to scope dynamically:

// we want to use "this" variable in embedded functions

function xyz(){
  // "this" is different here!
  console.log(this); // not what we wanted!
  function qwe(){
    // "this" is different here too!
    console.log(this); // not what we wanted!
  }
  ...
};

What can we do? Assign it to some variable and use it through the alias:

var abc = this; // we want to use this variable in embedded functions

function xyz(){
  // "this" is different here! --- but we don't care!
  console.log(abc); // now it is the right object!
  function qwe(){
    // "this" is different here too! --- but we don't care!
    console.log(abc); // it is the right object here too!
  }
  ...
};

this is not unique in this respect: arguments is the other pseudo variable that should be treated the same way — by aliasing.

share|improve this answer
5  
You really should bind "this" to the function call and not pass it around or traverse variable scopes with it –  michael Jun 12 '12 at 14:43

A good article which explains those little issues in javascript is this one:

http://www.alistapart.com/articles/getoutbindingsituations

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
a very good article –  Cheeso Dec 19 '09 at 0:49
1  
a great article! this has helped me understand binding so much better. –  Mansiemans Sep 8 '11 at 9:08
    
why didn't I find sooner? –  SinistraD Jun 4 '12 at 14:14
1  
it's a shame jQuery developers haven't read this. Oh for a jQuery-PrototypeJS lovechild! A powerful framework that comes with lots of lovely widgets... –  ndtreviv Oct 2 '12 at 15:08
    
jQuery has the proxy method for binding –  Jochen Bedersdorfer Jan 27 '13 at 18:56

Yeah, this appears to be a common standard. Some coders use self, others use me. It's used as a reference back to the "real" object as opposed to the event.

It's something that took me a little while to really get, it does look odd at first.

I usually do this right at the top of my object (excuse my demo code - it's more conceptual than anything else and isn't a lesson on excellent coding technique):

function MyObject(){
  var me = this;

  //Events
  Click = onClick; //Allows user to override onClick event with their own

  //Event Handlers
  onClick = function(args){
    me.MyProperty = args; //Reference me, referencing this refers to onClick
    ...
    //Do other stuff
  }
}
share|improve this answer

I haven't used jQuery, but in a library like Prototype you can bind functions to a specific scope. So with that in mind your code would look like this:

 $('#foobar').ready('click', this.doSomething.bind(this));

The bind method returns a new function that calls the original method with the scope you have specified.

share|improve this answer
    
Analogous to: $('#foobar').ready('click', this.doSomething.call(this)); right? –  Muers Aug 12 '11 at 4:56

yep, it's quite a lifesaver (or better, a 'sanitysaver'). of course, i got downvoted for claiming that it's one of the blunders of bad language design in JS

share|improve this answer
2  
I can't believe you thought you could knock the language design of JS and get away with it :oP JS coders are fanatics. –  BenAlabaster Dec 3 '08 at 20:27
    
as seen on some lists: "JavaScript is Scheme done wrong" –  Javier Dec 3 '08 at 22:51
3  
Bad design or not, your answer didn't improve the world in any way. –  Wojciech Kaczmarek Jan 23 '11 at 15:47
2  
+ 1 for free speech. –  ProfK Oct 13 '12 at 21:34
    
We need to be realistic in our criticisms of any language we use. +1 –  Greg Nov 2 '12 at 17:32

I think it actually depends on what are you going to do inside your doSomething function. If you are going to access MyObject properties using this keyword then you have to use that. But I think that the following code fragment will also work if you are not doing any special things using object(MyObject) properties.

function doSomething(){
  .........
}

$("#foobar").ready('click', function(){

});
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.