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I basically have something like this:

class CGlToolBase
{
public:
    CGlToolBase(void)
    {

    }
    virtual void OnMouseDown(CGlEngine &glEngine, WPARAM wParam, LPARAM lParam);
    virtual void OnMouseMove(CGlEngine &glEngine, WPARAM wParam, LPARAM lParam);
    virtual void OnMouseUp(CGlEngine &glEngine, WPARAM wParam, LPARAM lParam);
    virtual void OnKeyDown(CGlEngine &glEngine, WPARAM wParam, LPARAM lParam);
    virtual void OnLDoubleClick(CGlEngine &glEngine, WPARAM wParam, LPARAM lParam);
    ~CGlToolBase(void);
};

class CGlToolSelect : public CGlToolBase
{
   bool selected;
public:
    CGlToolSelect(void)
    {
     selected = false;
    }
    virtual void OnMouseDown(CGlEngine &glEngine, WPARAM wParam, LPARAM lParam);
    virtual void OnMouseMove(CGlEngine &glEngine, WPARAM wParam, LPARAM lParam);
    virtual void OnMouseUp(CGlEngine &glEngine, WPARAM wParam, LPARAM lParam);
    virtual void OnKeyDown(CGlEngine &glEngine, WPARAM wParam, LPARAM lParam);
    virtual void OnLDoubleClick(CGlEngine &glEngine, WPARAM wParam, LPARAM lParam);
    ~CGlToolSelect(void);
};

In my select tool I set selected to false. Is this the correct way to do it if I do something like this:

CGlToolBase *tool = new CGlToolSelect;

Thanks

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

That's perfectly legal and acceptable.

However, some notes:

Your destructor should be virtual. If any class has virtual methods (abstract or not), you should have a public virtual (abstract?) destructor (so delete calls the children destructors) or a protected non-virtual destructor (which prevents the superclass from being deleted as a superclass (it must be deleted as a subclass, thus calling the appropriate destructor)).

You may want to use initializers to set selected in the constructor:

CGlToolSelect() :
    selected(false)
{
}
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I use (void) because I'm a rebel. (It's a stylistic issue and nothing more; to me, it looks better.) –  GManNickG Jul 31 '10 at 22:48
    
@GMan, Alright; it's just something I learned to avoid, but I can't remember why right now. –  strager Jul 31 '10 at 22:49
1  
Its called destructor, not deconstructor. Regarding your virtual dtor guideline - please take a look at Sutters Virtuality (or at least #4 in the summary). –  Georg Fritzsche Jul 31 '10 at 23:00
    
...or you can use protected non-virtual inheritance. –  Clark Gaebel Jul 31 '10 at 23:02
    
Since you are adding style advice, I would not write the base constructor (empty initialization list, empty body). –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 31 '10 at 23:20

Is it proper to use a default constructor with polymorphism?

CGlToolBase *tool = new CGlToolSelect;

Sure - you notice that the argument to new is CGlToolSelect - at the point the memory is allocated and the constructor called, the exact class is known to the compiler. The correct derived-class constructor is used without any need for virtual dispatch. Which constructor you use, and specifically whether it's a default constructor (i.e. has no non-defaulted arguments) makes no difference at all: any one will work perfectly.

Separately - after the construction, the calling scope only has the CGlToolBase* object to go by and doesn't necessarily know the real run-time type of the object at the time it's deleted, which is why to get the run-time type appropriate constructor used you need to look it up using a record in the pointed-to object: virtual functions create exactly such a record (an entry in the virtual dispatch table), that's why making the destructor virtual solves this problem of invoking the correct destructor. In your specific example, it may not seem to matter as the derived class doesn't introduce any additional members with destructors of their own that need to be invoked, but remember that your derived class can itself be derived from, and those more-derived classes may introduce data members that need proper destruction in order to release resources such as heap memory, file handles, shared memory, locks etc.. Again, making the destructor virtual ensures the most-derived class's destructor is properly called, and the classes call back through the immediate base classes to the base class destructor.

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