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I know that .index() will return where a substring is located in python. However, what I want is to find where a substring is located for the nth time, which would work like this:

>> s = 'abcdefacbdea'
>> s.index('a')
0
>> s.nindex('a', 1)
6
>>s.nindex('a', 2)
11

Is there a way to do this in python?

share|improve this question
    
Note that I would probably call the second occurrence and third occurrence "1" and "2" respectively in keeping with Python's 0-indexed nature. – Mike Graham Aug 1 '10 at 5:55

13 Answers 13

up vote 7 down vote accepted

How about...

def nindex(mystr, substr, n=0, index=0):
    for _ in xrange(n+1):
        index = mystr.index(substr, index) + 1
    return index - 1

Obs: as str.index() does, nindex() raises ValueError when the substr is not found.

share|improve this answer
def nindex(needle, haystack, index=1):
     parts = haystack.split(needle)
     position = 0
     length = len(needle)
     for i in range(index - 1):
         position += len(parts[i]) + length
     return position

I'm interested to see other solutions, I don't feel that this is particularly pythonic.

share|improve this answer

I would probably use

[index for index, value in enumerate(s) if s == 'a'][n]

or

from itertools import islice
next(islice((index for index, value in enumerate(s) if s == 'a'), n, None))

or avoid dealing in indices at all.

share|improve this answer
    
I wrote this too first, but these things only work with one char search words. But index can do 'asdf'.index('sd') – Jochen Ritzel Aug 1 '10 at 13:29
    
Thanks for pointing that out. This fits the example purpose but is obviously less general. This technique is easily adapted if OP does need that functionality. – Mike Graham Aug 1 '10 at 16:44

Here's a memoized version that avoids wasted work as much as possible while maintaining something close [1] to your specs (rather than doing something saner such as looping through all hits;-)...:

[1]: just close -- can't have a new .nindex method in strings as you require, of course!-)

def nindex(haystack, needle, nrep=1, _memo={}):
  if nrep < 1:
    raise ValueError('%r < 1' % (nrep,))
  k = needle, haystack
  if k in _memo:
    where = _memo[k]
  else:
    where = _memo[k] = [-1]
  while len(where) <= nrep:
    if where[-1] is None:
      return -1
    w = haystack.find(needle, where[-1] + 1)
    if w < 0:
      where.append(None)
      return -1
    where.append(w)
  return where[nrep]

s = 'abcdefacbdea'
print nindex(s, 'a')
print nindex(s, 'a', 2)
print nindex(s, 'a', 3)

print 0, then 6, then 11, as requested.

share|improve this answer
    
Why adding None to where but returning -1 ? This would make the first call result different from subsequent ones... – 6502 Aug 1 '10 at 6:25
>>> from re import finditer, escape
>>> from itertools import count, izip

>>> def nfind(s1, s2, n=1):
...    """return the index of the nth nonoverlapping occurance of s2 in s1"""
...    return next(j.start() for i,j in izip(count(1), finditer(escape(s2),s1)) if i==n)
...
>>> nfind(s,'a')
0
>>> nfind(s,'a',2)
6
>>> nfind(s,'a',3)
11
share|improve this answer

Yes. Write a loop using s.index('yourstring', start)

Update after finding a big fat -1 ... didn't I write some code???

Here's my attempt at redemption, which allows non-overlapping if desired, and is tested to the extent shown:

>>> def nindex(haystack, needle, n, overlapping=True):
...    delta = 1 if overlapping else max(1, len(needle))
...    start = -delta
...    for _unused in xrange(n):
...       start = haystack.index(needle, start+delta)
...    return start
...
>>> for n in xrange(1, 11):
...    print n, nindex('abcdefacbdea', 'a', n)
...
1 0
2 6
3 11
4
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 2, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 5, in nindex
ValueError: substring not found
>>> for olap in (True, False):
...    for n in (1, 2):
...       print str(olap)[0], n, nindex('abababab', 'abab', n, olap)
...
T 1 0
T 2 2
F 1 0
F 2 4
>>> for n in xrange(1, 8):
...    print n, nindex('abcde', '', n)
...
1 0
2 1
3 2
4 3
5 4
6 5
7
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 2, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 5, in nindex
ValueError: substring not found
>>>
share|improve this answer
def nindex(str, substr, index):
  slice = str
  n = 0
  while index:
    n += slice.index(substr) + len(substr)
    slice = str[n:]
    index -= 1
  return slice.index(substr) + n
share|improve this answer
import re

def nindex(text, n=1, default=-1):
    return next(
        itertools.islice((m.start() for m in re.finditer('a', text)), n - 1, None),
        default
    )

print nindex(s)
print nindex(s, 1)
print nindex(s, 2)
print nindex(s, 3)
print nindex(s, 4)
share|improve this answer
def ifind( s, word, start=0 ):
    pos = s.find(word,start)
    while -1 < pos:
        yield pos
        pos = s.find(word,pos+1)

print list(ifind('abcdefacbdea', 'a'))     # [0, 6, 11]
print list(ifind('eee', 'a'))              # []
share|improve this answer
    
not found -> start == -1 -> start += 1 -> start == 0, does not stop – Tony Veijalainen Aug 1 '10 at 4:53
    
@Tony Veijalainen thanks, I fixed it ... I shouldn't write answers at 6am ;o – Jochen Ritzel Aug 1 '10 at 13:27

How about...

# index is 0-based
def nindex(needle, haystack, index=0):
     parts = haystack.split(needle)
     if index >= len(parts)-1:
         return -1
     return sum(len(x) for x in parts[:index+1])+index*len(needle)
share|improve this answer
import itertools
def multis(search,text,start=0):
    while start>-1:
        f=text.find(search,start)
        start=f
        if start>-1:
            yield f
            start+=1

# one based function for nth result only
def nindex(text,search,n):
    return itertools.islice(multis(search,text),n-1,n).next()

text = 'abcdefacbdea'
search = 'a'
print("Hit %i: %i" % (3, nindex(text,search,3)))
print ('All hits: %s' % list(multis(search,text)))

Without indexes:

def nthpartition(search,text,n=None):
    ## nth partition before and after or all if not n
    if not n:
        n=len(text) # bigger always than maximum number of n
    for i in range(n):
        before,search,text = text.partition(search)
        if not search:
            return
        yield before,text

text = 'abcdefacbdea'
search = 'a'
print("Searching %r in %r" % (search,text))

for parts in nthpartition(search,text): print(parts)
"""Output:
Searching 'a' in 'abcdefacbdea'
('', 'bcdefacbdea')
('bcdef', 'cbdea')
('cbde', '')
"""
share|improve this answer

Just call 'index' repeatedly, using the result of the last call (+ 1) as start position:

def nindex(needle, haystack, n):
"find the nth occurrence of needle in haystack"
  pos = -1
  for dummy in range(n):
    pos = haystack.index(needle, pos + 1)
  return pos

Note: I have not tested it.

share|improve this answer
    
-1 NameError: name 'index' is not defined – John Machin Aug 1 '10 at 10:02
    
@John: Tanks, fixed. – oefe Aug 1 '10 at 21:28

This one does the work in regex.. which is NOT (AFTER TESTING) potentially faster if you modified it to cache the compiled regex (or memoize it).

import re

def nindex(s, substr, n = 1):
    """Find the nth occurrence of substr in s."""
    safe_substr = re.escape(substr) 
    regex_str = ".*?(?:%s.*?){%i}(%s).*?" % (safe_substr, n - 1, safe_substr)
    regex = re.compile(regex_str)
    match = regex.search(s)    
    if match is None:
        index = None
    else:
        index = match.start(1)        
    return index


# The rest of this code is just test cases...
for search_str in ("a", "bc"):
    print "Looking for %s" % search_str
    for test_str in ('abcdefacbdea',
                     'abcdefacbdeaxxx',
                     'xxxabcdefacbdeaxxx'):
        for i in (0, 1, 2, 3, 4):      
            print("%s %i index: %s" % 
                  (test_str, i, nindex(test_str, search_str, i)))
    print 

Output is:

Looking for a
abcdefacbdea 0 index: None
abcdefacbdea 1 index: 0
abcdefacbdea 2 index: 6
abcdefacbdea 3 index: 11
abcdefacbdea 4 index: None
abcdefacbdeaxxx 0 index: None
abcdefacbdeaxxx 1 index: 0
abcdefacbdeaxxx 2 index: 6
abcdefacbdeaxxx 3 index: 11
abcdefacbdeaxxx 4 index: None
xxxabcdefacbdeaxxx 0 index: None
xxxabcdefacbdeaxxx 1 index: 3
xxxabcdefacbdeaxxx 2 index: 9
xxxabcdefacbdeaxxx 3 index: 14
xxxabcdefacbdeaxxx 4 index: None

Looking for bc
abcdefacbdea 0 index: None
abcdefacbdea 1 index: 1
abcdefacbdea 2 index: None
abcdefacbdea 3 index: None
abcdefacbdea 4 index: None
abcdefacbdeaxxx 0 index: None
abcdefacbdeaxxx 1 index: 1
abcdefacbdeaxxx 2 index: None
abcdefacbdeaxxx 3 index: None
abcdefacbdeaxxx 4 index: None
xxxabcdefacbdeaxxx 0 index: None
xxxabcdefacbdeaxxx 1 index: 4
xxxabcdefacbdeaxxx 2 index: None
xxxabcdefacbdeaxxx 3 index: None
xxxabcdefacbdeaxxx 4 index: None

Here's the memoized version:

def memoized_hedgehog_nindex(s, substr, n = 1, _memoized_regexes = {}):
    safe_substr = re.escape(substr) 
    regex_str = ".*?(?:%s.*?){%i}(%s).*?" % (safe_substr, n - 1, safe_substr)

    # memoize
    key = (n, safe_substr)
    if key in _memoized_regexes:
        regex = _memoized_regexes[key]
    else:
        regex = re.compile(regex_str)
        _memoized_regexes[key] = regex

    match = regex.search(s)    
    if match is None:
        index = None
    else:
        index = match.start(1)        
    return index
share|improve this answer
    
regex gets complicated with newlines and other things. You'd be advised to throw a few more rocks at this before adopting it. – demented hedgehog Mar 31 at 11:57
    
Better to memoize the answers not the regex I suspect. – demented hedgehog Mar 31 at 22:08

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