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I would like to know if it's possible to change the contents of the URL in the browser without reloading the page?

I use jQuery and Ajax to load new parts of my page. When I choose "product one", the direct link would be and for "product two" would be, but I don't want to reload the site to these pages.

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7 Answers 7

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You will have to add hash # if you want to prevent page from reloading.

The has an excellent screencast on that, have a look at:

Best Practices with Dynamic Content

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its now possible with HTML_5..

chack this link...

also facebook and google using this tric beside Hash(#) attribute

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Great! For cross browser support you can use a library like history.js – Pepper Jul 8 '11 at 19:09

This is possible in HTML5. See a demo here.

You can change the URL to another URL within the same domain, but can not change the domain for security reasons.

See the history interface in HTML5 specification for details.

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just use this one

window.history.pushState("object or string", "Title", "/new-url");
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Watch out for IE < 10: Use a polyfill like history.js. – Johann Feb 24 at 22:31

Yes, it is possible using the HTML5 History API. Check this page and this example

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You CAN do that. Though likely you'll need a modern browser. Have a look at this page: created by the Google Chrome team (I used Chrome 9 to read it). Changing pages doesn't reload the entire web page, but changes the URL.

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You can't. Only if you change the hash, like sAc told you.

But.. May I ask WHY?

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I'm not the OP, but I find it useful when you change your content via ajax, and then your visitor wants to store the page he is looking at to bookmarks/send via email/ etc.. – Yossarian Aug 1 '10 at 8:43
Like Yossarian said, that was one of my reasons. Also because the load of the page loading is less using ajax, and the loading of contens is better looking. – Paul Peelen Aug 1 '10 at 19:43
@Yossarian: I asked why he wants to use, like the initial Q was (not hash). @Paul: if you change more than 4-50% of your page content, you may want to rethink your strategy, because the speed you will gain with page transfer will be canceled by the DOM operation time :) – Ionut Staicu Aug 2 '10 at 6:18
Wrong answer. In HTML5 it is posible to do that. – sasa Apr 3 '11 at 10:49
@Sasa, agree. But try to do that in IE9 :) – Ionut Staicu Apr 7 '11 at 8:18

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