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I was given an English vocabulary assignment by my teacher.

Choose a random alphabet, say 'a' Write a word from the alphabet, say 'apple' Take the last word 'e' Write a word from e, say elephant Now from 't' and so on.. No repetition allowed

Make a list of 500 words. Mail the list to the teacher. :)

So Instead of doing it myself, I am working on a Java code which will do my homework for me. The code seems to be simple.

The core of algorithm: Pick up a random word from a dictionary, which satisfies the requirement. seek() with RandomAccessFile. Try to put it in a Set with ordering (maybe LinkedHashSet)

But the problem is the huge size of dictionary with 300 000+ enteries. :| Brute force random algorithms wont work.

What could be the best, quickest and most efficient way out?

****UPDATE :** Now that I have written the code and its working. How can I make it efficient so that it chooses common words? Any text files containing list of common words around??**

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FYI: 1 lakh = 100000 –  miku Aug 1 '10 at 8:28
    
Pretty much aware of it. The text file is of 4MB! –  Myth17 Aug 1 '10 at 8:38
1  
4MB is rather small, no? –  miku Aug 1 '10 at 8:50
    
For a text file its big right? :| –  Myth17 Aug 1 '10 at 8:54
    
Out of interest, what is the goal? To find the longest sequence of words without repeats? –  msandiford Aug 1 '10 at 8:56

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Either look for a data structure allowing you to keep a compacted dictionary in memory, or simply give your process more memory. Three hundred thousand words is not that much.

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And use a java dictionary container (e.g.) hashmap to put your dictionary file in of course :p (I read it like he's always seeking from file). –  KillianDS Aug 1 '10 at 8:44
    
I am always seeking from a file till now. :| –  Myth17 Aug 1 '10 at 8:48
2  
@Myth, don't - just read it into a HashMap and work with that. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Aug 1 '10 at 8:59

Hope this doesn't spoil your fun or something, but if I were you I'd take this approach..

Pseudo java:

abstract class Word {
    String word;
    char last();
    char first();         
}

abstract class DynamicDictionary {
    Map<Character,Set<Word>> first_indexed;

    Word removeNext(Word word){
        Set<Word> candidates = first_indexed.get(word.last());
        return removeRandom(candidates);
    }

    /**
     * Remove a random word out from the entire dic.
     */
     Word removeRandom();

    /**
     * Remove and return a random word out from the set provided.
     */
     Word removeRandom(Set<Word> wordset);    
}

and then

Word primer = dynamicDictionary.removeRandom();
List<Word> list = new ArrayList<Word>(500);
list.add(primer);
for(int i=0, Word cur = primer;i<499;i++){
    cur = dynamicDictionary.removeNext(cur);
    list.add(cur);
}

NOTE: Not intended to be viewed as actual java code, just a way to roughly explain the approach (no error handling, not a good class structure if it were really used, no encupsulation etc. etc.)

Should I encounter memory issues, maybe I'll do this:

abstract class Word {
    int lineNumber;
    char last();
    char first();
}

If that is not sufficient, guess I'll use a binary search on the file or put it in a DB etc..

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I think a way to do this could be to use a TreeSet where you put all the dictionary then use the method subSet to retreive all the words beginning by the desired letter and do a random on the subset.

But in my opinion the best way to do this, due to the quantity of data, would be to use a database with SQL requests instead of Java.

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If I do this:

class LoadWords {
  public static void main(String... args) {
    try {
      Scanner s = new Scanner(new File("/usr/share/dict/words"));
      ArrayList<String> ss = new ArrayList<String>();
      while (s.hasNextLine())
        ss.add(s.nextLine());
      System.out.format("Read %d words\n", ss.size());
    } catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
      e.printStackTrace(System.err);
    }
  }
}

I can run it with java -mx16m LoadWords, which limits the Java heap size to 16 Mb, which is not that much memory for Java. My /usr/share/dict/words file has approximately 250,000 words in it, so it may be a bit smaller than yours.

You'll need to use a different data structure than the simple ArrayList<String> that I've used. Perhaps a HashMap of ArrayList<String>, keyed on the starting letter of the word would be a good starting choice.

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Here is some word frequency lists: http://www.robwaring.org/vocab/wordlists/vocfreq.html

This text file, reachable from the above link, contains the first 2000 words that are used most frequently: http://www.robwaring.org/vocab/wordlists/1-2000.txt

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The goal is to increase your English language vocabulary - not to increase your computer's English language vocabulary.

If you do not share this goal, why are you (or your parents) paying tuition?

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2  
its a routine college assignment. And I am pretty confident about my english. Can be done easily. Writing a code for it will learning something. :) –  Myth17 Aug 1 '10 at 9:18
1  
It's such a stupid assignment that cheating is not only allowed -- it is recommended. I would return a list of 500 profanities just to make my point clear. –  COME FROM Aug 1 '10 at 10:26
    
I agree with Myth17, sounds like a snooze. –  Amir Rachum Aug 1 '10 at 10:27
    
If you are confident in your English, why are you taking English class? While I agree that it is a stupid assignment, why are you still enrolled. Why not get a real job or enrol in a decent college? If your boss (in a real job) gave you such a stupid assignment, you would at least have the satisfaction of receiving salary rather than paying tuition. –  emory Aug 1 '10 at 11:41
    
I was also quite confident with my English when I was in college, but often they REQUIRE us to sit in English class! No matter what your major is. At least in Japan.. –  Enno Shioji Aug 1 '10 at 15:18

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