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What I am trying to do is to generate some random numbers (not necessarily single digit) like

29106
7438
5646
4487
9374
28671
92
13941
25226
10076

and then count the number of digits I get:

count[0] =       3  Percentage =  6.82
count[1] =       5  Percentage = 11.36
count[2] =       6  Percentage = 13.64
count[3] =       3  Percentage =  6.82
count[4] =       6  Percentage = 13.64
count[5] =       2  Percentage =  4.55
count[6] =       7  Percentage = 15.91
count[7] =       5  Percentage = 11.36
count[8] =       3  Percentage =  6.82
count[9] =       4  Percentage =  9.09

This is the code I am using:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <time.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main() {

    int i;
    srand(time(NULL));
    FILE* fp = fopen("random.txt", "w");    
    // for(i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    for(i = 0; i < 1000000; i++)
        fprintf(fp, "%d\n", rand());
    fclose(fp);

    int dummy;
    long count[10] = {0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0};
    fp = fopen("random.txt", "r");
    while(!feof(fp)) {
        fscanf(fp, "%1d", &dummy);
        count[dummy]++;                 
    }
    fclose(fp);

    long sum = 0;
    for(i = 0; i < 10; i++)
        sum += count[i];

    for(i = 0; i < 10; i++)
        printf("count[%d] = %7ld  Percentage = %5.2f\n",
            i, count[i], ((float)(100 * count[i])/sum));

}

If I generate a large number of random numbers (1000000), this is the result I get:

count[0] =  387432  Percentage =  8.31
count[1] =  728339  Percentage = 15.63
count[2] =  720880  Percentage = 15.47
count[3] =  475982  Percentage = 10.21
count[4] =  392678  Percentage =  8.43
count[5] =  392683  Percentage =  8.43
count[6] =  392456  Percentage =  8.42
count[7] =  391599  Percentage =  8.40
count[8] =  388795  Percentage =  8.34
count[9] =  389501  Percentage =  8.36

Notice that 1, 2 and 3 have too many hits. I have tried running this several times and each time I get very similar results.

I am trying to understand what could cause 1, 2 and 3 to appear much more frequently than any other digit.


Taking hint from what Matt Joiner and Pascal Cuoq pointed out,

I changed the code to use

for(i = 0; i < 1000000; i++)
    fprintf(fp, "%04d\n", rand() % 10000);
// pretty prints 0
// generates numbers in range 0000 to 9999

and this is what I get (similar results on multiple runs):

count[0] =  422947  Percentage = 10.57
count[1] =  423222  Percentage = 10.58
count[2] =  414699  Percentage = 10.37
count[3] =  391604  Percentage =  9.79
count[4] =  392640  Percentage =  9.82
count[5] =  392928  Percentage =  9.82
count[6] =  392737  Percentage =  9.82
count[7] =  392634  Percentage =  9.82
count[8] =  388238  Percentage =  9.71
count[9] =  388352  Percentage =  9.71

What can be the reason that 0, 1 and 2 are favored?


Thanks everyone. Using

int rand2(){
    int num = rand();
    return (num > 30000? rand2():num);     
}

    fprintf(fp, "%04d\n", rand2() % 10000);

I get

count[0] =  399629  Percentage =  9.99
count[1] =  399897  Percentage = 10.00
count[2] =  400162  Percentage = 10.00
count[3] =  400412  Percentage = 10.01
count[4] =  399863  Percentage = 10.00
count[5] =  400756  Percentage = 10.02
count[6] =  399980  Percentage = 10.00
count[7] =  400055  Percentage = 10.00
count[8] =  399143  Percentage =  9.98
count[9] =  400104  Percentage = 10.00
share|improve this question
2  
rand() % 10000 is still biased: numbers from 0 to 9999 cover one slice uniformly, 10000 to 19999 another, … and the numbers from 30000 to 32767 create bias — assuming 32767 is the limit of your function rands(). I am sure there are existing questions on StackOverflow on how to get a uniformly distributed number between 0 and 9999. The simplest solution is to discard the numbers above 30000 by calling rands() again. –  Pascal Cuoq Aug 1 '10 at 10:37
    
This question is vaguely related, although it complicates the problem to make it a more interesting exercise: stackoverflow.com/questions/137783/… –  Pascal Cuoq Aug 1 '10 at 10:40
    
So are you just using the "digit count" as a check to see whether your random number generator is "random enough" (whatever that means)? As many have answered here, that's not necessarily a good check, as some ranges of numbers have different occurences of certain digits. Or do you have some specific reason for wanting an even distribution of digits? –  BradC Aug 5 '10 at 14:19
    
@BradC: No specific reason. Was reading about random numbers somewhere and decided to write this program. –  Moeb Aug 6 '10 at 5:16

6 Answers 6

up vote 46 down vote accepted

rand() generates a value from 0 to RAND_MAX. RAND_MAX is set to INT_MAX on most platforms, which may be 32767 or 2147483647.

For your example given above, it appears that RAND_MAX is 32767. This will place an unusually high frequency of 1, 2 and 3 for the most significant digit for the values from 10000 to 32767. You can observe that to a lesser degree, values up to 6 and 7 will also be slightly favored.

share|improve this answer
    
Beat me to it - good call. –  Will A Aug 1 '10 at 9:34
    
Why should 6 and 7 be slightly favored? –  Hippo Aug 1 '10 at 9:35
4  
'cause for any number > 32700, the fourth digit can be as high as 6. For any number > 32760, the fourth digit can be as high as 7. –  Will A Aug 1 '10 at 9:42
11  
Much more important that the bias for six and seven is the bias against zero. 00012 is pretty-printed "12" but 11112 is pretty-printed "11112". All leading zeroes that would make statistics balanced if the range was a power of ten are omitted by printf. –  Pascal Cuoq Aug 1 '10 at 9:54
    
Thanks Will and Pascal, very good observations/points. –  Matt Joiner Aug 1 '10 at 11:33

Regarding the edited question,

This is because the digits are still not uniformly distributed even if you % 10000. Assume RAND_MAX == 32767, and rand() is perfectly uniform.

For every 10,000 numbers counting from 0, all of the digits will appear uniformly (4,000 each). However, 32,767 is not divisible by 10,000. Therefore, these 2,768 numbers will provide more leading 0, 1 and 2's to the final count.

The exact contribution from these 2,768 numbers are:

digits count
0      1857
1      1857
2      1625
3      857
4      857
5      857
6      855
7      815
8      746
9      746

adding 12,000 for the initial 30,000 numbers to the count, then divide by the total number of digits (4×32,768) should give you the expected distribution:

number  probability (%)
0       10.5721
1       10.5721
2       10.3951
3        9.80911
4        9.80911
5        9.80911
6        9.80759
7        9.77707
8        9.72443
9        9.72443

which is close to what you get.

If you want to truly uniform digit distribution, you need to reject those 2,768 numbers:

int rand_4digits() {
  const int RAND_MAX_4_DIGITS = RAND_MAX - RAND_MAX % 10000;
  int res;
  do {
    res = rand();
  } while (res >= RAND_MAX_4_DIGITS);
  return res % 10000;
}
share|improve this answer

Looks like Benford's Law - see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benford%27s_law, or alternatively a not very good RNG.

share|improve this answer
1  
Benfords law was my first thought as well, but doesnt it hold just for "real-life" data, i.e. empirically retrieved data? –  phimuemue Aug 1 '10 at 9:35
    
1.23% of statistics will not comply with Benford's law, except for on 3/12/2013. Sorry - couldn't resist. My belief is that this is indeed just for real-life data. –  Will A Aug 1 '10 at 9:40
    
Benford's Law explains the same observation but not under the given circumstances. I assume a pseudo-random uniform distribution. Benford's law applys to distributions which have uniform logarithms. –  Peter G. Aug 1 '10 at 9:40
    
1111222334 Nice link –  Matt Joiner Aug 2 '10 at 6:19

That's because you generate numbers between 0 and RAND_MAX. The generated numbers are evenly distributed (i.e. approx. same probability for each number), however, the digits 1,2,3 occur more often than others in this range. Try generating between 0 and 10, where each digit occurs with the same probability and you'll get a nice distribution.

share|improve this answer

If I understand what the OP (person asking the question) wants, they want to make better random numbers.

rand() and random(), quite frankly, don't make very good random numbers; they both do poorly when tested against diehard and dieharder (two packages for testing the quality of random numbers).

The Mersenne twister is a popular random number generator which is good for pretty much everything except crypto-strong random numbers; it passes all of the diehard(er) tests with flying colors.

If one needs crypto-strong random numbers (numbers that can not be guessed, even if someone knows which particular crypto-strong algorithm is being used), there are a number of stream ciphers out there. The one I like to use is called RadioGatún[32], and here’s a compact C representation of it:

/*Placed in the public domain by Sam Trenholme*/
#include <stdint.h>
#include <stdio.h> 
#define p uint32_t
#define f(a) for(c=0;c<a;c++)
#define n f(3){b[c*13]^=s[c];a[16+c]^=s[c];}k(a,b 
k(p *a,p *b){p A[19],x,y,r,q[3],c,i;f(3){q[c]=b[c
*13+12];}for(i=12;i;i--){f(3){b[c*13+i]=b[c*13+i- 
1];}}f(3){b[c*13]=q[c];}f(12){i=c+1+((c%3)*13);b[
i]^=a[c+1];}f(19){y=(c*7)%19;r=((c*c+c)/2)%32;x=a
[y]^(a[(y+1)%19]|(~a[(y+2)%19]));A[c]=(x>>r)|(x<<
(32-r));}f(19){a[c]=A[c]^A[(c+1)%19]^A[(c+4)%19];
}a[0]^=1;f(3){a[c+13]^=q[c];}}l(p *a,p *b,char *v
){p s[3],q,c,r,x,d=0;for(;;){f(3){s[c]=0;}for(r=0
;r<3;r++){for(q=0;q<4;q++){if(!(x=*v&255)){d=x=1;
}v++;s[r]|=x<<(q*8);if(d){n);return;}}}n);}}main(
int j,char **h){p a[39],b[39],c,e,g;if(j==2){f(39
){a[c]=b[c]=0;}l(a,b,h[1]);f(16){k(a,b);}f(4){k(a
,b);for(j=1;j<3;++j){g=a[j];for(e=4;e;e--){printf
("%02x",g&255);g>>=8;}}}printf("\n");}}

There are also a lot of other really good random number generators out there.

share|improve this answer
1  
WHY do people feel the need to cram code into an unreadable 10 cm/squared box? If you hate the code so much that you would rather not read it, put it in its own file and forget about it.. but writing this kind of obfuscated horror is just beyond me. It's like painting a work of art and then pissing all over it when you're done (unless this was an IOCCC contestant..) –  Thomas Sep 27 '13 at 6:39
    
Various more readable versions of the same algorithm are at samiam.org/rg32 –  samiam Jan 24 at 18:34

When you want to generate random value from range [0, x), instead of doing rand()%x, you should apply formula x*((double)rand()/RAND_MAX), which will give you nicely distributed random values.

Say, RAND_MAX is equal to 15, so rand will give you integers from 0 to 15. When you use modulo operator to get random numbers from [0, 10), values [0,5] will have higher frequency than [6,9], because 3 == 3%10 == 13%10.

share|improve this answer

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