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What is the best way to convert a string to hex and vice versa in C++?

Example:

  • A string like "Hello World" to hex format: 48656C6C6F20576F726C64
  • And from hex 48656C6C6F20576F726C64 to string: "Hello World"
share|improve this question
1  
What exactly do you mean by "to hex"? Isn't the string already in hex? –  FredOverflow Aug 1 '10 at 11:27
    
what platform? XP? Linux? –  user195488 Aug 1 '10 at 13:07
    
@FredOverflow: A string like "Hello World" to hex format: 48656C6C6F20576F726C64. –  Sebtm Aug 1 '10 at 16:41
    
@0A0D: A Crossplatform solution. –  Sebtm Aug 1 '10 at 16:42

7 Answers 7

up vote 30 down vote accepted

A string like "Hello World" to hex format: 48656C6C6F20576F726C64.

Ah, here you go:

#include <string>

std::string string_to_hex(const std::string& input)
{
    static const char* const lut = "0123456789ABCDEF";
    size_t len = input.length();

    std::string output;
    output.reserve(2 * len);
    for (size_t i = 0; i < len; ++i)
    {
        const unsigned char c = input[i];
        output.push_back(lut[c >> 4]);
        output.push_back(lut[c & 15]);
    }
    return output;
}

#include <algorithm>
#include <stdexcept>

std::string hex_to_string(const std::string& input)
{
    static const char* const lut = "0123456789ABCDEF";
    size_t len = input.length();
    if (len & 1) throw std::invalid_argument("odd length");

    std::string output;
    output.reserve(len / 2);
    for (size_t i = 0; i < len; i += 2)
    {
        char a = input[i];
        const char* p = std::lower_bound(lut, lut + 16, a);
        if (*p != a) throw std::invalid_argument("not a hex digit");

        char b = input[i + 1];
        const char* q = std::lower_bound(lut, lut + 16, b);
        if (*q != b) throw std::invalid_argument("not a hex digit");

        output.push_back(((p - lut) << 4) | (q - lut));
    }
    return output;
}

(This assumes that a char has 8 bits, so it's not very portable, but you can take it from here.)

share|improve this answer
    
I had to mask the shifted lut index, i.e. (c >> 4) & 0x0F to make this work for me. –  liwp Aug 24 '11 at 15:47
string ToHex(const string& s, bool upper_case /* = true */)
{
    ostringstream ret;

    for (string::size_type i = 0; i < s.length(); ++i)
        ret << std::hex << std::setfill('0') << std::setw(2) << (upper_case ? std::uppercase : std::nouppercase) << (int)s[i];

    return ret.str();
}

int FromHex(const string &s) { return strtoul(s.c_str(), NULL, 16); }
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2  
+1, but I would implement the second in terms of istringstream -- strtoul is not a standard library function. –  Billy ONeal Aug 1 '10 at 14:40
1  
Why FromHex returns as an int? Should return as a string. –  Sebtm Aug 1 '10 at 16:46
    
@Sebtm: if you call FromHex("10"); it will return 16, since 10 in hex is 16 –  Krevan Aug 1 '10 at 17:12
1  
toHex function gave me strange results. It turns out you should convert the byte into an unsigned 8-bit integer (UINT8 in windows). –  atoMerz Feb 15 at 6:38

You can try this. It's Working...

#include <algorithm>
#include <sstream>
#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>
#include <iomanip>

namespace {
   const std::string test="hello world";
}

int main() {
   std::ostringstream result;
   result << std::setw(2) << std::setfill('0') << std::hex << std::uppercase;
   std::copy(test.begin(), test.end(), std::ostream_iterator<unsigned int>(result, " "));
   std::cout << test << ":" << result.str() << std::endl;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is pretty nice. How would you do it the other way? –  Timmmm Sep 20 '12 at 22:53
    
This does not work with small character values (e.g. If your string is \x01\x02\x03) –  BatchyX Dec 14 '12 at 9:50
    
it works, change your string like "\\x01\\x02\\x03". because compiler doesnt compile "\x" character. –  Mahmut EFE Dec 14 '12 at 13:24
    
It seems to work for small character values, but not large ones. test="\xf0" should encode to "f0", but it gives "fffffff0". –  richvdh Aug 16 '13 at 16:16
    
I take that back, it does fail on small character values too. std::setw() only has an effect for the next write. –  richvdh Aug 16 '13 at 16:23

Simplest example using the Standard Library.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
  char c = 'n';
  cout << "HEX " << hex << (int)c << endl;  // output in hexadecimal
  cout << "ASC" << c << endl; // output in ascii
  return 0;
}

To check the output, codepad returns: 6e

and an online ascii-to-hexadecimal conversion tool yields 6e as well. So it works.

You can also do this:

template<class T> std::string toHexString(const T& value, int width) {
    std::ostringstream oss;
    oss << hex;
    if (width > 0) {
        oss << setw(width) << setfill('0');
    }
    oss << value;
    return oss.str();
}
share|improve this answer

This is a bit faster:

static const char* s_hexTable[256] = 
{
    "00", "01", "02", "03", "04", "05", "06", "07", "08", "09", "0a", "0b", "0c", "0d", "0e", "0f", "10", "11",
    "12", "13", "14", "15", "16", "17", "18", "19", "1a", "1b", "1c", "1d", "1e", "1f", "20", "21", "22", "23",
    "24", "25", "26", "27", "28", "29", "2a", "2b", "2c", "2d", "2e", "2f", "30", "31", "32", "33", "34", "35",
    "36", "37", "38", "39", "3a", "3b", "3c", "3d", "3e", "3f", "40", "41", "42", "43", "44", "45", "46", "47",
    "48", "49", "4a", "4b", "4c", "4d", "4e", "4f", "50", "51", "52", "53", "54", "55", "56", "57", "58", "59",
    "5a", "5b", "5c", "5d", "5e", "5f", "60", "61", "62", "63", "64", "65", "66", "67", "68", "69", "6a", "6b",
    "6c", "6d", "6e", "6f", "70", "71", "72", "73", "74", "75", "76", "77", "78", "79", "7a", "7b", "7c", "7d",
    "7e", "7f", "80", "81", "82", "83", "84", "85", "86", "87", "88", "89", "8a", "8b", "8c", "8d", "8e", "8f",
    "90", "91", "92", "93", "94", "95", "96", "97", "98", "99", "9a", "9b", "9c", "9d", "9e", "9f", "a0", "a1",
    "a2", "a3", "a4", "a5", "a6", "a7", "a8", "a9", "aa", "ab", "ac", "ad", "ae", "af", "b0", "b1", "b2", "b3",
    "b4", "b5", "b6", "b7", "b8", "b9", "ba", "bb", "bc", "bd", "be", "bf", "c0", "c1", "c2", "c3", "c4", "c5",
    "c6", "c7", "c8", "c9", "ca", "cb", "cc", "cd", "ce", "cf", "d0", "d1", "d2", "d3", "d4", "d5", "d6", "d7",
    "d8", "d9", "da", "db", "dc", "dd", "de", "df", "e0", "e1", "e2", "e3", "e4", "e5", "e6", "e7", "e8", "e9",
    "ea", "eb", "ec", "ed", "ee", "ef", "f0", "f1", "f2", "f3", "f4", "f5", "f6", "f7", "f8", "f9", "fa", "fb",
    "fc", "fd", "fe", "ff"
};

// Convert binary data sequence [beginIt, endIt) to hexadecimal string
void dataToHexString(const uint8_t*const beginIt, const uint8_t*const endIt, string& str)
{
    str.clear();
    str.reserve((endIt - beginIt) * 2);
    for(const uint8_t* it(beginIt); it != endIt; ++it)
    {
        str += s_hexTable[*it];
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
did you measure? –  Abyx Apr 23 '13 at 13:14
    
...pun intended? –  blissfreak Dec 27 '13 at 8:21

Using lookup tables and the like works, but is just overkill, here are some very simple ways of taking a string to hex and hex back to a string:

#include <stdexcept>
#include <sstream>
#include <iomanip>
#include <string>

std::string string_to_hex(const std::string& in) {
    std::stringstream ss;

    ss << std::hex << std::setw(2) << std::setfill('0');
    for (size_t i = 0; in.length() > i; ++i) {
        ss << static_cast<unsigned int>(static_cast<unsigned char>(in[i]));
    }

    return ss.str(); 
}

std::string hex_to_string(const std::string& in) {
    std::string output;

    if ((in.length() % 2) != 0) {
        throw std::runtime_error("String is not valid length ...");
    }

    size_t cnt = in.length() / 2;

    for (size_t i = 0; cnt > i; ++i) {
        uint32_t s = 0;
        std::stringstream ss;
        ss << std::hex << in.substr(i * 2, 2);
        ss >> s;

        output.push_back(static_cast<unsigned char>(s));
    }

    return output;
}
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Why has nobody used sprintf?

#include <string>
#include <stdio.h>

static const std::string str = "hello world!";

int main()
{
  //copy the data from the string to a char array
  char *strarr = new char[str.size()+1];
  strarr[str.size()+1] = 0; //set the null terminator
  memcpy(strarr, str.c_str(),str.size()); //memory copy to the char array

  printf(strarr);
  printf("\n\nHEX: ");

  //now print the data
  for(int i = 0; i < str.size()+1; i++)
  {
    char x = strarr[i];
    sprintf("%x ", reinterpret_cast<const char*>(x));
  }

  //DO NOT FORGET TO DELETE
  delete(strarr);

  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
because it's not C++ –  Abyx Apr 23 '13 at 13:15
    
@Abyx But isn't C++ a superset of C? Doesn't this mean that we can use some stuff from C? –  Colorless Photon Jul 4 '13 at 4:14
1  
Did you actually try running this? it's nowhere near correct. –  richvdh Aug 16 '13 at 16:32

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