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I've been asking, searching, rating and reading for about a week now trying to get a decent source control process up together and my major stumbling block has been references to projects in other repositories and managing third party libraries. This was compounded by conflicting views on whether to store binaries in the source control system

So, here are the main rules that I intend to apply (in no particular order):

  • Keep all third-party libraries in a separate source control repository
  • Store only the source of the library and checkout and build when you need it. If the source isn't available, just store the binaries
  • When you need to use one of these external libraries, make it a part of your build script to checkout and build from source control (add some 'check for file' statements to your build scripts so that the library is only built on first checkout to save build time)
  • When referencing a project outside of the current solution (i.e. one of your organisations 'Common' libraries, use the same method as using an external library but ALWAYS checkout a release branch!
  • An exception to the above... If you need to add functionality to the common library, create a new branch and include a project reference into your solution. But don't forget to revert to the above method when the changes have been made and accepted back into the trunk

All comments and feedback welcome. Please be harsh! I need to get this right first time!

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4 Answers 4

I always try to implement suggestions given by the MSDN patterns & practices team.

Using Team Foundation Server as source management I thoroughly read patterns & practices: Team Development with Visual Studio Team Foundation Server which suggests each TFS Project to have a folder "SharedBinaries" to put built versions of external projects (common libraries, third-party libraries) which makes building and branching rather easy.

When one of referenced libraries changes, you have to update the "SharedBinaries" folder of each TFS Project that contains a reference to that library and rebuild its solutions.

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Keeping all third-party libraries in a separate source control repository

Really what you are stating as a principal is that you want to build your code off a consistent and controllable baseline or set of third party components. Source control is one way of doing this.

Microsoft has introduced Nuget a package management tool, this also has the same goals but is more usable in day to day development. If you are working mainly with Microsoft development technologies I don't think you would be going too wrong in using this.

It may even make sense to establish your own internal Nuget repository with sanctioned packages.

Store only the source of the library and checkout and build when you need it. If the source isn't available, just store the binaries

and

When you need to use one of these external libraries, make it a part of your build script to checkout and build from source control (add some 'check for file' statements to your build scripts so that the library is only built on first checkout to save build time)

I would can this idea, it is not something that I have seen in use elsewhere. Primarily for the reason that you can't guarantee that first principal. Even though your source may not have changed, there is the possibility that you have a different version of the OS or compiler which could introduce other changes.

Hence you violate "consistent and controllable baseline" ideal.

When referencing a project outside of the current solution (i.e. one of your organisations 'Common' libraries, use the same method as using an external library but ALWAYS checkout a release branch!

Again each of the external common projects I would suggest should not be included and rebuilt directly within your current solution, reason being the same as point 2 - each time your rebuild your code other external factors can introduce other variations i.e. compiler, OS.

To isolate change when you compile the common libraries/projects you can upload them to your own internal Nuget repository where everyone can locate them.

An exception to the above... If you need to add functionality to the common library, create a new branch and include a project reference into your solution. But don't forget to revert to the above method when the changes have been made and accepted back into the trunk

I would have the trunk as being your main place of change with branches being stable code releases with only minor bug fixes in them (easier to merge) but this is a matter of preference.

See here for another view on this matter.

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The only unclear points for me are those related to third-party libraries. I do not see much sense in storing third-party source code (until you plan modifying it) but is easier for developers start using library if it was already build. So I'm usually store compiled version of 3rd-party libraries and optionally a source code.

Also regarding separate folder for 3rd party libs. Are you talking about common folder for many projects. It may become unconvinient to have a common folder with 3rd party libs for several projects if you do not plan to store every used version of that library. Otherwise some day somebody will decide to start using newer version of the library and you will have to check all projects against new library.

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Jason, you won't get it right the first time. Setting up a source control solution can take a number of iterations because it is a trade off of compromises. You won't know which compromises you can live with until you've experienced them, and which ones have the least friction for you dev/deployment environment. Thinking, reading and asking questions will definitely help to reduce the pain. But there will still be pain.

Aside from that I think you have a reasonable starting point. Although I would not go to the extent of rebuilding 3rd party libraries unless I had modified them, but then they aren't really third party anymore are they. Just put the binaries in a single location and update them as you upgrade to new releases. I say this just to reduce any unnecessary complexity. For example, if you are building the 3rd party library you then need to make sure you have all the necessary libraries that the 3rd party library references (which will all have different versions etc)

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