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I have multiple rows with time

"42 sec"
"1 min"
"2 h 32 min"

Is it possible to convert this to

"00:00:42"
"00:01:00"
"02:32:00"

with php?

share|improve this question
    
Is the data you need to convert following a fixed pattern? Because in your third example, 2 h has a space in between. Is that intentional? –  Pekka 웃 Aug 1 '10 at 16:17
    
As far as the fixed pattern, there's a space in 1 min and not in 32min too –  hookedonwinter Aug 1 '10 at 16:28
    
@hookedonwinter Sorry. Edited . :) –  simple Aug 1 '10 at 16:43
    
no worries. My answer allows 1 space. –  hookedonwinter Aug 1 '10 at 16:44

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

PHP's strtotime() is a useful function that can convert a string representation of a time into a unix timestamp. From that we can then convert the time into any format we like.

However, your original time strings aren't in a format that strtotime() can handle directly. eg. 'h' must be 'hour'. But we could perhaps replace these before passing to strtotime() if your data is consistent.

Note we attempt to convert the original time relative to 0, not the current time.

$rawTimes = array ('42 sec', '1 min', '2 h 32min');
foreach ($rawTimes as $rawTime) {
  // Convert into a format that strtotime() can understand
  $rawTime = str_replace('h','hour',$rawTime);
  echo '"'.$rawTime.'" = "'.gmdate('H:i:s',strtotime($rawTime,0)).'"'."\n";
}

Will output:

"42 sec" = "00:00:42"
"1 min" = "00:01:00"
"2 hour 32min" = "02:32:00"

Note that strtotime() understands 'sec', 'second', 'min', 'minute' and 'hour'. And appears to handle space or no space OK eg. '32min' or '32 min' is handled OK.

share|improve this answer
    
Great solution @w3d. I didn't realize you could do the 0 date like that. I was trying to figure out a way to use strtotime(), and was thinking of doing something like now + 42 seconds - now. Good one. –  hookedonwinter Aug 1 '10 at 16:56
    
@hookedonwinter - thanks. The 2nd param is for calculating relative dates. You could may be do strtotime($rawTime)-time() in this particular instance, but unnecessary. –  w3d Aug 1 '10 at 17:29
    
gotta love learning stuff when you didn't even ask :) –  hookedonwinter Aug 1 '10 at 17:50

http://php.net/manual/en/function.strtotime.php

<?php
$dates = array("42 sec", "1 min", "2 hour 32 min"); // normalise last item

foreach($dates as $d)
    printf("%5s - %s\n", $d, nSecs($d));

function nSecs($date)
{
    $t = strtotime("+1 day $date");
    return $t - strtotime("+1 day");
}
?>

If you can normalise the h => hour, it's not so bad.

share|improve this answer
    
echo strtotime( "42 sec" ); returns 1280680057, which probably isn't incredibly helpful to the OP. –  hookedonwinter Aug 1 '10 at 16:27
    
` <?php $dates = array("42 sec", "1 min", "2 hour 32 min"); // normalise last item foreach ($dates as $d) printf("%5s - %s\n", $d, nSecs($d)); function nSecs($date) { $t = strtotime("+1 day $date"); return $t - strtotime("+1 day"); } ?> ` If you can normalise the h => hour it's not so bad. –  Robin Aug 1 '10 at 17:22
    
for sure. Just gotta put that in the answer, not link the guy to a function doc :) –  hookedonwinter Aug 1 '10 at 17:49

Not the cleanest solution, but it works for your three cases:

<?
    $time[] = "42 sec";
    $time[] = "1 min";
    $time[] = "2 h 32min";

    $seconds = '/([\d]{1,})\s?sec/';
    $minutes = '/([\d]{1,})\s?min/';
    $hours = '/([\d]{1,})\s?h/';

    foreach( $time as $t )
    {
        echo '<br />';
        preg_match( $hours, $t, $h );
        $hour = $h[1];
        if( $hour )
        {
            if( strlen( $hour )<2 )
                $hour = '0' . $hour;
        }
        else
            $hour = '00';


        preg_match( $minutes, $t, $m );
        $min = $m[1];
        if( $min )
        {
            if( strlen( $min )<2 )
                $min = '0' . $min;
        }
        else
            $min = '00';

        preg_match( $seconds, $t, $s );
        $sec = $s[1];
        if( $sec )
        {
            if( strlen( $sec )<2 )
                $sec = '0' . $sec;
        }
        else
            $sec = '00';

        echo $hour . ':' . $min . ':' . $sec;

    }
?>

Outputs:

00:00:42
00:01:00
02:32:00
share|improve this answer

I'm pretty sure there's a better solution, but that one works.

function timetotime($str) {
    $match = null;
    if (preg_match("/(\d+)(\s?)h/", $str, &$match)) {
        $h = $match[1];
        if ($h < 10)
            $result = "0{$h}:";
        else
            $result = "{$h}:";
    } else 
        $result = "00:";

    if (preg_match("/(\d+)(\s?)min/", $str, &$match)) {
        $h = $match[1];
        if ($h < 10)
            $result .= "0{$h}:";
        else
            $result .= "{$h}:";
    } else
        $result .= "00:";

    if (preg_match("/(\d+)(\s?)sec/", $str, &$match)) {
        $h = $match[1];
        if ($h < 10)
            $result .= "0{$h}";
        else
            $result .= "{$h}";
    } else
        $result .= "00";

    return $result;
}
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