Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

OK I'm just learning C with this book of Kernighan and Ritchie; I'm in the basics of the fourth chapter (functions stuff). The other day I came in curiosity with this function sleep(), so tried to use it like this:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>

int main(void)
{
  printf(" I like cows.");
  sleep(5);
  return 0;
}

The problem is the output of the program, it looks like it does the sleep() first and then the printf(), in other words, it waits five seconds and then prints the string. So i thought, maybe the program gets to sleep() so fast that it doesnt let printf() have his work done like i want, that is print the string and then sleep.

So my question is, How can i show the string and then put the program to sleep? The compiler is GCC 3.3.5 (propolice) in OpenBSD 4.3.

PS I don't know how you put here the preprocessor lines correctly.

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

printf() writes to stdout (the default output stream) which is usually line buffered. The buffer isn't flushed by the time sleep is called so nothing is displayed, when the program exits all streams are automatically flushed which is why it prints right before exiting. Printing a newline will usually cause the stream to be flushed, alternatively you could use the fflush function:

int main(void)
{
  printf(" I like cows.\n");
  sleep(5);
  return 0;
}

or:

int main(void)
{
  printf(" I like cows.");
  fflush(stdout);
  sleep(5);
  return 0;
}

If you are printing to a stream that is not line buffered, as may be the case if stdout is redirected or you are writing to a file, simply printing a newline probably won't work. In such cases you should use fflush if you want the data written immediately.

share|improve this answer
    
You have an extra \n in the second example –  Vinko Vrsalovic Dec 3 '08 at 18:48
    
The reason adding a \n to the string works is that printf to the console is line buffered. However, if you redirect it to to a file it might not be enough because it uses a different buffering scheme. –  Paul Tomblin Dec 3 '08 at 18:48
    
Interesting question then is, how can you tell which buffering mode is your current file pointer using? –  Vinko Vrsalovic Dec 3 '08 at 18:54
    
@Paul, right, that is why I said it will usually cause the stream to be flushed but I'll go ahead and clarify. –  Robert Gamble Dec 3 '08 at 18:55
    
@Vinko, there is no standard function that will tell you what the buffering mode for a stream is but many implementations have their own functions (glibc has __flbf and __fbufsize for example). –  Robert Gamble Dec 3 '08 at 19:14
show 1 more comment

Buffering means that all the output is stored in a place (called buffer) and is output after a certain amount of data is present in it. This is done for efficiency reasons.

Some (most?) implementations clear the buffer after a newline when writing to the console, so you can also try

printf(" I like cows.\n");

instead of the call to fflush()

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your problem is that printf (and anything else that uses the stdio library to write to stdout (standard output)) is buffered - line buffered if it goes to the console, and size buffered if it goes to a file. If you do a fflush(stdout); after the printf, it will do what you want. You could try just adding a newline (\n) to your string, and that would do the right thing as long as you don't redirect standard output to a file.

I'm not 100% sure, but I think stderr isn't buffered, which can cause confusion because you might see output you made to stderr before output you previously made to stdout.

share|improve this answer
    
printf isn't buffered, the stream that it is writing to is. –  Robert Gamble Dec 3 '08 at 18:47
    
stderr is usually unbuffered (although it may be line buffered). –  Robert Gamble Dec 3 '08 at 19:04
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.