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You can create a subclass of an exception to make it more descriptive, but how should you set the default 'message'?

class MyError < StandardError
  # default message = "You've triggered a MyError"
end

begin
  raise MyError, "A custom message"
rescue Exception => e
  p e.message
end

begin
  raise MyError
raise Exception => e
  p e.message
end

The first should output 'A custom message'

The second should output 'You've triggered a MyError'

Any suggestions as to best practice?

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up vote 49 down vote accepted

Define an initialize method, which takes the message as an argument with a default value. Then call StandardError's initialize method with that message (using super).

class MyError < StandardError
  def initialize(msg = "You've triggered a MyError")
    super(msg)
  end
end
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28  
Just super is enough. If you call super without an argument list, it will simply pass on all arguments, which is why, when you actually want to pass no arguments, you must explicitly call super(). – Jörg W Mittag Aug 2 '10 at 1:04
    
@JörgWMittag Why all the custom error classes inherit from StandardError ? Any reason behind it? – Arup Rakshit Dec 27 '14 at 11:34
    
@ArupRakshit Because its safe. Whenever rescuing from errors it should be a StandardError (or lower), as higher level errors such as Exception can even be thrown when hitting CTL-C etc. See this for more info rails-bestpractices.com/posts/2012/11/01/… – Sean Jan 7 '15 at 22:36
    
@Sean Thanks for the link. – Arup Rakshit Jan 8 '15 at 5:35

You may also overwrite the message method in your subclass and return the string you'd like displayed. I prefer this as it seems to keep things a little cleaner if you want to do anything interesting before displaying the message.

class CustomError < StandardError

  def initialize(error_code, error_info)
    @code, @info = error_code, error_info
  end

  def message
    "<Code: #{@code}> <Info: #{@info}>"
  end

end
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