Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've distilled my problem down to this code snippet - but it is a part of a larger program so I don't want a different way to do this - I need a way to make this work!

When I generate a preprocessed file from this code:

#define OUTER(a, b) \
    a##b
#define INNER(c, d) \
    c##d

enum foo {
    OUTER(INNER(x, y), z)
}; // line 108

int APIENTRY _tWinMain(...)
{
    foo bar = xyz; // line 112
}

I get:

enum foo {
    xyz
}; // line 108

int __stdcall wWinMain(...)
{
    foo bar = xyz; // line 112
}

which is what I want. However, if I try to compile the code I get:

error C2146: syntax error : missing '}' before identifier 'z' line 108
error C2143: syntax error : missing ';' before '}' line 108
error C2143: syntax error : missing ';' before '}' line 108
error C2059: syntax error : '}' line 108
error C2065: 'xyz' : undeclared identifier line 112

I can't work it out! The problem seems to be caused by the ## in the:

#define OUTER(a, b) \
    a##b

but why (and how to fix it) is beyond me...

share|improve this question
    
@Jack Could you explain what a##b is supposed to do? Never saw this before. –  InsertNickHere Aug 1 '10 at 17:45
1  
@Insert It's a preprocessor operator that literally concatenates its two arguments. For instance, OUTER(test, string) in the OP code snippet is replaced by teststring by the preprocessor. –  Mehrdad Afshari Aug 1 '10 at 17:47
    
OK well I can confirm that this happens in gcc too, and their error is a bit more descriptive. It's saying that it can't paste ) and z together. It looks to me like the preprocessor can't do nested pastes like this, but this is guesswork at this point. Hope that helps a bit.. –  Blindy Aug 1 '10 at 17:48
1  
@InsertNickHere It's token concatenation, part of any C preprocessor. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C_preprocessor#Token_concatenation –  nos Aug 1 '10 at 17:49
1  
Can you provide a more realistic example of usage or the macros? Right now, the macros are essentially useless. –  strager Aug 1 '10 at 17:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Use this instead:

#define CONCAT(X,Y) X##Y
#define OUTER(a, b) CONCAT(a,b)
#define INNER(a, b) CONCAT(a,b)

enum foo {
    OUTER(INNER(x, y),z)
}; // line 108

int main(...)
{
    foo bar = xyz; // line 112
}
share|improve this answer
    
Woo hoo it works! But can you explain to me why it works? Why is my preprocessed output correct? I see from the gcc error described below that it appears to be keeping a ")" and trying to concatenate the "z" to "xy)"? But this doesn't appear in my preprocessed output! –  Jack Aug 1 '10 at 17:59
    
Read Jonathan Leffler's canonical answer: stackoverflow.com/questions/1489932/… –  Nordic Mainframe Aug 1 '10 at 18:04
    
Ah! Is OUTER getting "INNER(c, d), z" and not "xy, z" as I thought? That would make sense. But I still don't get why my preprocessed output is correct! –  Jack Aug 1 '10 at 18:05
    
No need to declare two separate OUTER/INNER macros, this works also: OUTER(OUTER(x, y),z) –  Agnius Vasiliauskas Aug 28 '10 at 7:47

Preprocessing your example with gcc results in:

enum foo {
t.c:7:1: error: pasting ")" and "z" does not give a valid preprocessing token
    xy z
};

which should give you a clue of why Luther's solution works and yours doesn't.

share|improve this answer

If you are using gcc, then you can give it the -E option to see the preprocessed output. Then you can easily see what the preprocessor has output and how to further debug your macros. Other compilers also have similar options.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.