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I found out that the following code gets accepted by Visual C++ 2008 and GCC 4.3 compilers:

void foo()
{

}

void bar()
{
  return foo();
}

I am a bit surprised that it compiles. Is this a language feature or is it a bug in the compilers? What do the C/C++ standards say about this?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 47 down vote accepted

It's a language feature of C++

C++ (ISO 14882:2003) 6.6.3/3

A return statement with an expression of type “cv void” can be used only in functions with a return type of cv void; the expression is evaluated just before the function returns to its caller.

C (ISO 9899:1999) 6.8.6.4/1

A return statement with an expression shall not appear in a function whose return type is void.

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Yes, it is valid code. This is necessary when you have template functions so that you can use uniform code. For example,

template<typename T, typename P>
T f(int x, P y)
{
  return g(x, y);
}

Now, g might be overloaded to return void when the second argument is some particular type. If "returning void" were invalid, the call to f would then break.

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1  
T can't be void, because a parameter cannot be void. –  strager Aug 1 '10 at 17:54
    
Thanks,I've realized myself a few minutes after that I've given a bad example. Fixed! –  zvrba Aug 1 '10 at 17:59
1  
This feature also opens a little trap: in void positive_action(int n) { if (n<0) return; action(n); [...] }, if action returns void, then forgetting the semicolon after return will give no errors or warnings, but action now get called whe n is negative rather than when it is positive. –  Marc van Leeuwen Apr 18 at 7:13

This is valid and can be quite useful for example to create cleaner code in situations when you want to do some error handling before returning:

void ErrRet(int code, char* msg)
{
   // code logging/handling error
}
void f()
{
   if (...) return ErrRet(5, "Error Message !");
   // code continue
}
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