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Here is my JPA2 / Hibernate definition:

Code:
@Column(nullable = false)
private boolean enabled;

In MySql this column is resolved to a bit(1) datatype - which does not work for me. For legacy issues I need to map the boolean to a tinyint not to a bit. But I do not see a possibility to change the default datatype. Is there any?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Try the NumericBooleanType. For some reason this doesn't have a declared short type name so you'd have to use:

@Column(nullable = false)
@Type(type = "org.hibernate.type.NumericBooleanType")
private boolean enabled;

This does map to an INTEGER type but it will probably work fine with a TINYINT.

UPDATE: org.hibernate.type.NumericBooleanType Does not work with TINYINT in some RDBMS. Switch the database column type to INTEGER. Or use a different Java @Type value, or columnDefinition, as appropriate.

In this example, Dude's answer of @Column(nullable = false, columnDefinition = "TINYINT(1)") would work without any database changes.

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Works fine, but after changing bit(1) to int –  zaletniy Mar 22 '12 at 12:48
    
-1, but only because @Dude answer is better. –  Johan Feb 22 '13 at 18:14

@Type annotation is an Hibernate annotation.

In full JPA2 (with Hibernate 3.6+), the way to map a Boolean field to a TINYINT(1) SQL type instead of BIT(1), is to use the columnDefinition attribute.

@Column(nullable = false, columnDefinition = "TINYINT(1)")
private boolean enabled;

nb: length attribute seems to have no effect in this case, then we use (1) syntax.

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thank you very much bro! –  Valter Henrique Apr 5 '13 at 3:26
3  
Since MySQL aliases BOOLEAN to TINYINT(1) one can also use columnDefinition = "BOOLEAN", which might be a little more readable. –  eggyal Sep 26 '13 at 9:29
    
you're right, you can also use the BOOLEAN alias with MySQL as long as the alias is realy set to TINYINT, which is true for now. By the way, BOOLEAN and TINYINT are both not standard SQL data types, so you take a risk of failure if you change your data provider dialect (ex: Oracle). –  Dude Jan 27 at 14:16

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