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I have a simple program which reads a bunch of things from the filesystem, filters the results , and prints them. This simple program implements a domain specific language to make selection easier. This DSL "compiles" down into an execution plan that looks like this (Input was C:\Windows\System32\* OR -md5"ABCDEFG" OR -tf):

Index  Success  Failure  Description
    0        S        1  File Matches C:\Windows\System32\*
    1        S        2  File MD5 Matches ABCDEFG
    2        S        F  File is file. (Not directory)

The filter is applied to the given file, and if it succeeds, the index pointer jumps to the index indicated in the success field, and if it fails, the index pointer jumps to the number indicated in the failure field. "S" means that the file passes the filter, F means that the file should be rejected.

Of course, a filter based upon a simple file attribute (!FILE_ATTRIBUTE_DIRECTORY) check is much faster than a check based upon the MD5 of the file, which requires opening and performing the actual hash of the file. Each filter "opcode" has a time class associated with it; MD5 gets a high timing number, ISFILE gets a low timing number.

I would like to reorder this execution plan so that opcodes that take a long time are executed as rarely as possible. For the above plan, that would mean it would have to be:

Index  Success  Failure  Description
    0        S        1  File is file. (Not directory)
    1        S        2  File Matches C:\Windows\System32\*
    2        S        F  File MD5 Matches ABCDEFG

According to the "Dragon Book", picking the best order of execution for three address code is an NP-Complete problem (At least according to page 511 of the second edition of that text), but in that case they are talking about register allocation and other issues of the machine. In my case, the actual "intermediate code" is much simpler. I'm wondering of a scheme exists that would allow me to reorder the source IL into the optimal execution plan.

Here is another example:
{ C:\Windows\Inf* AND -tp } OR { -tf AND NOT C:\Windows\System32\Drivers* }

Parsed to:

Index  Success  Failure  Description
    0        1        2  File Matches C:\Windows\Inf\*
    1        S        2  File is a Portable Executable
    2        3        F  File is file. (Not directory)
    3        F        S  File Matches C:\Windows\System32\Drivers\*

which is optimally:

Index  Success  Failure  Description
    0        1        2  File is file. (Not directory)
    1        2        S  File Matches C:\Windows\System32\Drivers\*
    2        3        F  File Matches C:\Windows\Inf\*
    3        S        F  File is a Portable Executable
share|improve this question
    
I don't see much of a problem here. Why can't you strictly order everything by your 'cost' heuristic? –  strager Aug 1 '10 at 20:30
    
@Neil: I guess it's not really C++ related. Removing the tag. @strager: Err... if you just sort then you will change the meaning of the expression. –  Billy ONeal Aug 1 '10 at 20:48
    
Ah, I misunderstood. @Greg Hewgill's diagram helped me understand. –  strager Aug 1 '10 at 21:21

2 Answers 2

It sounds like it might be easier to pick an optimal order before compiling down to your opcodes. If you have a parse tree, and it is as "flat" as possible, then you can assign a score to each node and then sort each node's children by the lowest total score first.

For example:

{ C:\Windows\Inf* AND -tp } OR { -tf AND NOT C:\Windows\System32\Drivers* }
         1             2          3                 4

      OR
     /  \
  AND    AND
 /  \   /   \
1    2 3     4

You could sort the AND nodes (1, 2) and (3, 4) by the lowest score and then assign that score to each node. Then sort the children of the OR node by the lowest score of their children.

Since AND and OR are commutative, this sorting operation won't change the meaning of your overall expression.

share|improve this answer
    
This is a good idea, but it won't work on, say { -tf OR C:\Blach OR -tp } OR { C:\Windows* OR -tp }, because the bracketed subexpressions are under the OR, and the optimal case is to evaluate C:\Windows* before -tp on the left hand side. –  Billy ONeal Aug 1 '10 at 20:49
    
That situation is actually covered by my cryptic "as flat as possible" comment. Since the OR is all commutative, your grouping isn't relevant and all those OR conditions should be considered all together. You can sort those in any order you like. You may have to apply a transformation to your original parse tree to flatten out the conditional groups like this. –  Greg Hewgill Aug 1 '10 at 20:56
    
@Greg: Ah, I see. Still would rather look for a solution that works on the "compiled" code because I don't want to have to rewrite the whole parser to use an Abstract Syntax Tree (It generates this without actually using a tree), but +1 for now. –  Billy ONeal Aug 1 '10 at 21:00
    
@Billy ONeal, What's wrong with building the tree afterwards then re-flattening it (other than being somewhat redundant)? –  strager Aug 1 '10 at 23:22
    
@strager: Err.. how would you construct such a tree? The IL doesn't cleanly decompile back to the source expression. –  Billy ONeal Aug 1 '10 at 23:26

@Greg Hewgill is right, this is easier to perform on the AST than on the Intermediate code. As you want to work on the Intermediate code, the first goal is to transform it into a dependency tree (which will look like the AST /shrug).

Start with the leaves - and it is probably easiest if you use negative-predicates for NOT.

Index  Success  Failure  Description
0        1        2  File Matches C:\Windows\Inf\*
1        S        2  File is a Portable Executable
2        3        F  File is file. (Not directory)
3        F        S  File Matches C:\Windows\System32\Drivers\*

Extract Leaf (anything with both children as S, F, or an extracted Node; insert NOT where required; Replace all references to Leaf with reference to parent node of leaf)

Index  Success  Failure  Description
0        1        2  File Matches C:\Windows\Inf\*
1        S        2  File is a Portable Executable
2        L1        F  File is file. (Not directory)

L1=NOT(cost(child))
    |
Pred(cost(PATH))

Extract Node (If Success points to Extracted Node use conjunction to join; Failure uses disjunction; Replace all references to Node with reference to resulting root of tree containing Node).

Index  Success  Failure  Description
0        1        L3  File Matches C:\Windows\Inf\*
1        S        L3  File is a Portable Executable


L3=AND L1 L2 (cost(Min(L1,L2) + Selectivity(Min(L1,L2)) * Max(L1,L2)))
               /           \
L1=NOT(cost(child))     L2=IS(cost(child))
    |                       |
3=Pred(cost(PATH))      2=Pred(cost(ISFILE))

Extract Node

Index  Success  Failure  Description
0        L5       L3  File Matches C:\Windows\Inf\*

L5=OR L3 L4 (cost(Min(L3,L4) + (1.0 - Selectivity(Min(L3,L4))) * Max(L3,L4)))
                    /                          \
                    |                       L4=IS(cost(child))
                    |                           | 
                    |                       1=Pred(cost(PORT_EXE))
                    |
L3=AND L1 L2 (cost(Min(L1,L2) + Selectivity(Min(L1,L2)) * Max(L1,L2)))
               /           \
L1=NOT(cost(child))     L2=IS(cost(child))
    |                       |
3=Pred(cost(PATH))      2=Pred(cost(ISFILE))

Extract Node (In the case where Success and Failure both refer to Nodes, you will have to inject the Node into the tree by pattern matching on the root of the sub-tree defined by the Node)

  1. If root is OR, invert predicate if necessary to ensure reference is Success and inject as conjunction with child not referenced by Failure.

  2. If root is AND, invert predicate if necessary to ensure reference is Failure and inject as disjunction with child root referenced by Success.

Resulting in:

L5=OR L3 L4 (cost(Min(L3,L4) + (1.0 - Selectivity(Min(L3,L4))) * Max(L3,L4)))
                    /                          \
                    |                       L4=AND(cost(as for L3))
                    |                             /               \
                    |                       L6=IS(cost(child))   L7=IS(cost(child))
                    |                           |                       |
                    |                       1=Pred(cost(PORT_EXE))   0=Pred(cost(PATH))
                    |
L3=AND L1 L2 (cost(Min(L1,L2) + Selectivity(Min(L1,L2)) * Max(L1,L2)))
               /           \
L1=NOT(cost(child))     L2=IS(cost(child))
    |                       |
3=Pred(cost(PATH))      2=Pred(cost(ISFILE))
share|improve this answer
    
"which will look like the AST /shrug" <-- Yes, but has the additional advantage that it's always going to be the flattest tree -- the AST will not always be the flattest, and making if flattest looks more complicated than what you have identified here. (Oh, and +1) –  Billy ONeal Aug 4 '10 at 1:35
    
My concern is that the algorithm I've presented is based on pattern matching. If you are using F#, ML, Scala, Haskell, or something with a good pattern matching library (I've seen a good one available for scheme) then implementing it in an imperative OOP language (C#, Java, C++, etc) is going to get hairy. Having previously implemented both approaches in both functional-pattern-matching and imperative-oop forms, I would much prefer to be writing tree-walking rewriters applying basic boolean identities if I have the choice. –  Recurse Aug 4 '10 at 1:50
    
Where is pattern matching involved here? (The IL itself isn't actually stored in this string-based format -- it's stored as a bunch of "OpCode" objects in a vector) This has the additional advantage that the optimizer can be A. Switched on and off, and B. does not need to be modified if/when the parser changes (i.e. to accommodate new language features) –  Billy ONeal Aug 4 '10 at 3:57

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