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I am roughly working with the following:

var i;
var k = 5;
$('document').ready(function () {
    $('#someElement').click(function (e) {
        e.stopImmediatePropagation();
        i++;
        if (i >= k) {
            my_function();
        });
    }
});
my_function() {
    alert(i);
    $('#myDisplay').text("You have clicked on '#someElement' " + i + "times");
}

'my_function()' fires when I click on '#someElement', as expected, but the alertbox pops up 5 TIMES!!!.

A quick and obvious solution would be to place the contents of my_function() and place them into the if control statement attached to '#someElement', but I am very keen to keep the structure I've outlined, and am sure there's a simple way to do so.

Any ideas?

UPDATE

I originally assumed that the problem was with the function call from within my 'click' event. It wasn't, I think the problem may have something to do with the nested 'ajaxComplete' call:

var i = 0;

$('document').ready(function () {

    $('<div id="someElement">Click me</div>').appendTo('body');
    $('<div id="myDisplay"></div>').appendTo('body');
    $('#someElement').click(function (e) {
        i++;
        $.get("test.html", function(html)
        {       
            $(html).ajaxComplete(function()
            {
                my_function(i);
            });
        });

    });

});

function my_function(n)
{

    switch (n)
    {

    case 1:
        alert(n);
        $('#myDisplay').text("this is case " + n);
        break
    case 2:
        alert(n);
        $('#myDisplay').text("this is case " + n);
        break
    case 3:
        alert(n);
        $('#myDisplay').text("this is case " + n);
        break

    default:
        alert('A great detective always breaks the case. :)');
        break

    }

}

I've omitted the constant 'k', as the case statements render the 'if' statement from the previous example useless. The code above provides a better illustration of the problem I've encountered.

Any help will be much appreciated. :)

share|improve this question
    
Indent the code properly first. –  Anders Aug 1 '10 at 23:40

1 Answer 1

Edit based on updated question:

The issue is that you're calling $.ajaxComplete() in your callback. You should get rid of that. The anonymous callback function is all you need.

The purpose of $.ajaxComplete() is to setup a default function to run when any ajax request completes. If this is what you want, you should take it out of the current callback, and just place it in the .ready() call so that it only runs once.

The way you're doing it right now, for each click (and successful response) you're adding another identical handler. So after you click 5 times, it now has 5 of the same click handler.

From the docs: http://api.jquery.com/ajaxComplete/

Whenever an Ajax request completes, jQuery triggers the ajaxComplete event. Any and all handlers that have been registered with the .ajaxComplete() method are executed at this time.


Original answer

This must not be your actual code, because it won't run at all the way you have it.

You don't have a function declaration for your function. You need to initialize i with a value like 0, and your closing parenthesis for the click handler is misplaced.

That said, your code works fine for me when corrected.

Try it out: http://jsfiddle.net/sGWjL/1/

If the alert pops up 5 times for you, then you need to paste more (or actual) code being used.

var i = 0;
var k = 5;

$('document').ready(function () {
    $('#someElement').click(function (e) {
        e.stopImmediatePropagation();
        i++;
        if (i >= k) {
            my_function();
        }
    });
});

function my_function() {
    alert(i);
    $('#myDisplay').text("You have clicked on '#someElement' " + i + "times");
}​
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the prompt replies! I really like that jsfiddle.net app, by the way. ;) I'll also make an effort to indent my code before posting. Aside from the elementary mistake I made with the undeclared variable, the code did indeed work correctly. I've have edited my original post, to present a code example that's more reflective of the problem I've encountered. Cheers to all of you. :) –  Leonard Aug 2 '10 at 2:35
    
@Leonard - I updated my answer (see above). Basically you either need to get rid of .ajaxComplete(), and just call my_function() in your callback, or if you want .ajaxComplete(), only call it once. Right now you're calling it once for each ajax response. –  user113716 Aug 2 '10 at 3:10

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