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I'm using SQLBULKCOPY to copy some data-tables into a database table, however, because the size of the files I'm copying run sometimes in excess of 600mb, I keep running out of memory.

I'm hoping to get some advice about managing the table size before I commit it to the database so I can free up some memory to continue writing.

Here are some examples of my code (some columns and rows eliminated for simplicity)

            SqlBulkCopy sqlbulkCopy = new SqlBulkCopy(ServerConfiguration); //Define the Server Configuration
        System.IO.StreamReader rdr = new System.IO.StreamReader(fileName);

        Console.WriteLine("Counting number of lines...");
        Console.WriteLine("{0}, Contains: {1} Lines", fileName, countLines(fileName));

        DataTable dt = new DataTable();

        sqlbulkCopy.DestinationTableName = "[dbo].[buy.com]"; //You need to define the target table name where the data will be copied
        dt.Columns.Add("PROGRAMNAME");
        dt.Columns.Add("PROGRAMURL");
        dt.Columns.Add("CATALOGNAME");

        string inputLine = "";
        DataRow row; //Declare a row, which will be added to the above data table

        while ((inputLine = rdr.ReadLine()) != null) //Read while the line is not null
            {
                i = 0;
                string[] arr;

                Console.Write("\rWriting Line: {0}", k);
                arr = inputLine.Split('\t'); //splitting the line which was read by the stream reader object (tab delimited)
                row = dt.NewRow();
                row["PROGRAMNAME"] = arr[i++];
                row["PROGRAMURL"] = arr[i++];
                row["CATALOGNAME"] = arr[i++];
                row["LASTUPDATED"] = arr[i++];
                row["NAME"] = arr[i++];
                dt.Rows.Add(row);
                k++;
        }

        // Set the timeout, 600 secons (10 minutes) given table size--damn that's a lota hooch
        sqlbulkCopy.BulkCopyTimeout = 600;
        try
        {
            sqlbulkCopy.WriteToServer(dt);
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(e);
        }
        sqlbulkCopy.Close();//Release the resources
        dt.Dispose();

        Console.WriteLine("\nDB Table Written: \"{0}\" \n\n", sqlbulkCopy.DestinationTableName.ToString());

    }

I continued to have problems getting SQLBulkCopy to work, and I realized I needed to do more work on each record before it was entered into the database, so I developed a simple LinQ to Sql method to do record by record updates, so I could edit other information and create more record information as it was being run,

Problem: This method's been running pretty slow (even on Core i3 machine), any ideas on how to speed it up (threading?) -- on a single processor core, with 1gb of memory it crashes or takes sometimes 6-8 hours to write the same amount of data as one SQLBulkCopy that takes a few moments. It does manage memory better though.

            while ((inputLine = rdr.ReadLine()) != null) //Read while the line is not null
        {
            Console.Write("\rWriting Line: {0}", k);
            string[] arr;              
            arr = inputLine.Split('\t');

            /* items */
            if (fileName.Contains(",,"))
            {
                Item = Table(arr);
               table.tables.InsertOnSubmit(Item);

                /* Check to see if the item is in the db */
                bool exists = table.tables.Where(u => u.ProductID == Item.ProductID).Any();

                /* Commit */
                if (!exists)
                {
                    try
                    {
                        table.SubmitChanges();
                    }
                    catch (Exception e)
                    {
                        Console.WriteLine(e);
                        // Make some adjustments.
                        // ...
                        // Try again.
                        table.SubmitChanges();
                    }
                }
            }

With helper method:

    public static class extensionMethods
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Method that provides the T-SQL EXISTS call for any IQueryable (thus extending Linq).
    /// </summary>
    /// <remarks>Returns whether or not the predicate conditions exists at least one time.</remarks>
    public static bool Exists<TSource>(this IQueryable<TSource> source, Expression<Func<TSource, bool>> predicate)
    {
        return source.Where(predicate).Any();
    }
}
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1  
perhaps also disposing of the rdr might be a good idea –  Mitch Wheat Aug 2 '10 at 3:49
    
thanks -- I'll keep that in mind I'm wondering, if I dispose my reader before I finish reader before I finish reading each file I'll loose my pace as I'm reading straight through and I'm having an out of memory error while I'm reading not while I'm writing... Any thoughts on how I would jump back to where I was in the file? –  jordan.baucke Aug 2 '10 at 7:20
    
please see above comment... –  Mitch Wheat Aug 2 '10 at 9:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try specifying the BatchSize property to 1000 which will batch up the insert in a 1000 record batch rather than the whole lot. You can tweak this value to find what is optimal. I have used sqlbulkcopy for similar size data and it works well.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I added this and starting writing every 100k records, I think my problem is with the file reader object because I run out of memory at about the same place each time-- trying to figure out how I could keep my spot in the file as I'm reading straight through right now... –  jordan.baucke Aug 2 '10 at 7:21
    
I still dont think the filestream is the issue. Did you try batching size of about 1000? Apparently batching at about 1000-2000 record is most effective. If you are certain that it is the file, what you can do is open the file, read a thousand record, store the position do a bulk insert, then close the file. Open it again and set the position to the last pos and read another batch. –  Fadrian Sudaman Aug 2 '10 at 10:52
    
You must be right, because I have the actual copy in a "try" block, and I get an out of memory exception, so it must be related to something in the try block otherwise I wouldn't be dealing with it properly. Ill try saving my file position and report the results. –  jordan.baucke Aug 3 '10 at 3:50

Faced with the same issue, found that problem of OutOfMemory Exception was in DataTable.Rows maximum quantity limitations. Solved with recreating table, with maximum 500000 rows limit. Hope, my solution will be helpfull:

var myTable = new System.Data.DataTable();
myTable.Columns.Add("Guid", typeof(Guid));
myTable.Columns.Add("Name", typeof(string));

int counter = 0;

foreach (var row in rows)
{
    ++counter;

    if (counter < 500000)
    {
        myTable.Rows.Add(
            new object[]
            {
                row.Value.Guid,
                row.Value.Name
            });
    }
    else
    {
        using (var dbConnection = new SqlConnection("Source=localhost;..."))
        {
            dbConnection.Open();
            using (var s = new SqlBulkCopy(dbConnection))
            {
                s.DestinationTableName = "MyTable";

                foreach (var column in myTable.Columns)
                    s.ColumnMappings.Add(column.ToString(), column.ToString());

                try
                {
                    s.WriteToServer(myTable);
                }
                catch (Exception ex)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);
                }
                finally
                {
                    s.Close();
                }
            }
        }

        myTable = new System.Data.DataTable();
        myTable.Columns.Add("Guid", typeof(Guid));
        myTable.Columns.Add("Name", typeof(string));

        myTable.Rows.Add(
            new object[]
            {
                row.Value.Guid,
                row.Value.Name
            });

        counter = 0;

    }
}
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