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Hello there I am facing a weird problem I have defined I a structure in a C header file:

typedef struct iRecActive{

    char iRecSID[32];
    unsigned char RecStatus;
    int curSel;

}iRecAcitve_t;

but when I use the same structure in another file, the compiler doesn't recognize the structure even though I have double checked that I have included its header file. Following is the error :

: error C2065: 'iRecActive_t' : undeclared identifier

Following is the full code of the file where I have defined the structure

#ifndef _TS_HTTP_APPLICATION_H_
#define _TS_HTTP_APPLICATION_H_

#ifdef __cplusplus
extern "C"
{
#endif

typedef struct iRecActive{

    char iRecSID[32];
    unsigned char RecStatus;
    int curSel;

}iRecAcitve_t;

int startHTTPServer(int HTMLserverPort);
int closeHTTPServer();

int openTS_SegmenterN();
void pushTSDataN(unsigned char* TSData, int len);
void closeTS_SegmenterN();

void removeAllConnections();

#ifdef __cplusplus
}
#endif

#endif
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3  
Note that you shouldn't use the _t suffix for your own types/structs/classes. –  PeterK Aug 2 '10 at 6:38
    
better use different name for typedef tag & that of structure itself. –  Kedar Aug 2 '10 at 6:52
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

change iRecAcitve_t to iRecActive_t.

share|improve this answer
    
it can still work if author uses iRecAcitve_t to create the instance of typedef structure? –  Kedar Aug 2 '10 at 6:51
    
Thanks a lot man, you literally scanned my code. And I am an absurd :D Once again thanks –  Omayr Aug 2 '10 at 6:56
    
@Kedar, yes but if the code already references iRecActive_t, then changing the declaration is easier. –  Matt Ellen Aug 2 '10 at 7:12
    
@Kedar, and this is where I'll cite the broken window theorem. When you see a single broken window, fix it, else all of your windows will soon be broken. –  Nathan Ernst Aug 2 '10 at 7:56
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I tried to find solution for similar problem but I didn't find it on stack. I leave here answer for other people, to save their time:

Because it is C, you cannot create your variables where you want. They must be created at the beginning of statement. So this is correct:

if(true) {
   iRecActive_t myRecActive;
   //calculations
   Mutex_Lock(somemutext);
   variable = 14;

And this is incorrect:

if(true) {
   //calculations
   Mutex_Lock(somemutext);
   variable = 14;
   iRecActive_t myRecActive;

In last example you get error message: illegal use of this type as expression or some other similar, very useful errors.

Proper question is here, but it was marked as duplication (it is not!): typedef stuct problem in C (illegal use of this type as an expression)

Regards, Ikeban

share|improve this answer
    
It's the exact same question, just posting a different error message and as written confused the crap out of people.. Your answer would be a potential answer to the question he SHOULD have asked there, but isn't an answer to THIS question's question. (i.e. nothing wrong with the technical aspects of what you provided just placement issues mostly caused by OP) –  UpAndAdam Oct 2 '13 at 15:09
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