Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a snippet of code, simply trying to execute a script on a remote server, in the event that it fails, I'd like to make a follow-up call, imagine this:

require 'rubygems'
require 'net/ssh'
require 'etc'

server = 'localhost'

Net::SSH.start(server, Etc.getlogin) do |ssh|
  puts (ssh.exec("true")  ? 'Exit Success' : "Exit Failure")
  puts (ssh.exec("false") ? 'Exit Success' : "Exit Failure")  
end

I would expect (ignoring that stdout and stderr are printed in my contrived example) - but first line should exit with 0 which I would expect Ruby would interperate as false and display "Exit Failure" (sure, so the logic is wrong, the ternary needs to be flipped) - but the second line should exit with the opposite status, and it doesn't.

I can't even find anything in the documentation about how to do this, and I'm a little worried that I might be doing it wrong?!

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 48 down vote accepted

I find the following way of running processes with Net::SSH much more useful. It provides you with distinct stdout and stderr, exit code and exit signal.

require 'rubygems'
require 'net/ssh'
require 'etc'

server = 'localhost'

def ssh_exec!(ssh, command)
  stdout_data = ""
  stderr_data = ""
  exit_code = nil
  exit_signal = nil
  ssh.open_channel do |channel|
    channel.exec(command) do |ch, success|
      unless success
        abort "FAILED: couldn't execute command (ssh.channel.exec)"
      end
      channel.on_data do |ch,data|
        stdout_data+=data
      end

      channel.on_extended_data do |ch,type,data|
        stderr_data+=data
      end

      channel.on_request("exit-status") do |ch,data|
        exit_code = data.read_long
      end

      channel.on_request("exit-signal") do |ch, data|
        exit_signal = data.read_long
      end
    end
  end
  ssh.loop
  [stdout_data, stderr_data, exit_code, exit_signal]
end

Net::SSH.start(server, Etc.getlogin) do |ssh|
  puts ssh_exec!(ssh, "true").inspect
  # => ["", "", 0, nil]

  puts ssh_exec!(ssh, "false").inspect  
  # => ["", "", 1, nil]

end

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow, that's cool. Thanks. –  sarnold Aug 2 '10 at 9:09
    
flitzwald, that's awesome - I wish I could retrospectively add a bounty or something! Thanks a lot! –  Lee Hambley Aug 2 '10 at 11:26
    
Thank you very much. It works perfectly. This should be in Net::SSH. –  dsabanin Apr 19 '11 at 13:27
    
this is a great function! thanks! –  pablo Jan 11 '12 at 22:21
4  
Note... exit-signal returns a string so it should be exit_signal = data.read_string –  pedz Oct 20 '12 at 14:21

Building on the answer by flitzwald - I've monkey patched my version of this into Net::SSH (Ruby 1.9+)

class Net::SSH::Connection::Session
  class CommandFailed < StandardError
  end

  class CommandExecutionFailed < StandardError
  end

  def exec_sc!(command)
    stdout_data,stderr_data = "",""
    exit_code,exit_signal = nil,nil
    self.open_channel do |channel|
      channel.exec(command) do |_, success|
        raise CommandExecutionFailed, "Command \"#{command}\" was unable to execute" unless success

        channel.on_data do |_,data|
          stdout_data += data
        end

        channel.on_extended_data do |_,_,data|
          stderr_data += data
        end

        channel.on_request("exit-status") do |_,data|
          exit_code = data.read_long
        end

        channel.on_request("exit-signal") do |_, data|
          exit_signal = data.read_long
        end
      end
    end
    self.loop

    raise CommandFailed, "Command \"#{command}\" returned exit code #{exit_code}" unless exit_code == 0

    {
      stdout:stdout_data,
      stderr:stderr_data,
      exit_code:exit_code,
      exit_signal:exit_signal
    }
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
Did you consider sending this as a patch up-stream to them? –  Lee Hambley Nov 19 '12 at 11:12
    
I'm currently working on a project which relies on this function - once I've got it tested I will. There are occasions where the exit code is > 0 despite successful execution, so I'll most likely modify the raise to be optional –  Mikey Nov 20 '12 at 8:37
    
@Mikey What situations would that be? Would there be a nonzero exit code because the shell, ssh or library communication problem or would the command return nonzro exit code but did its job? –  Phillipp Aug 20 at 21:53
    
@Phillipp, I can't remember the circumstances, it was probably a specific tool which was not following convention. I think my main point was that I wanted the raise to be an optional. –  Mikey Aug 21 at 9:40
    
@Mikey Okay, thanks for the clarification. –  Phillipp Aug 21 at 12:57

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.