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I have a Queue object that I need to ensure is thread-safe. Would it be better to use a lock object like this:

lock(myLockObject)
{
//do stuff with the queue
}

Or is it recommended to use Queue.Synchronized like this:

Queue.Synchronized(myQueue).whatever_i_want_to_do();

From reading the MSDN docs it says I should use Queue.Synchronized to make it thread-safe, but then it gives an example using a lock object. From the MSDN article:

To guarantee the thread safety of the Queue, all operations must be done through this wrapper only.

Enumerating through a collection is intrinsically not a thread-safe procedure. Even when a collection is synchronized, other threads can still modify the collection, which causes the enumerator to throw an exception. To guarantee thread safety during enumeration, you can either lock the collection during the entire enumeration or catch the exceptions resulting from changes made by other threads.

If calling Synchronized() doesn't ensure thread-safety what's the point of it? Am I missing something here?

share|improve this question
up vote 44 down vote accepted

Personally I always prefer locking. It means that you get to decide the granularity. If you just rely on the Synchronized wrapper, each individual operation is synchronized but if you ever need to do more than one thing (e.g. iterating over the whole collection) you need to lock anyway. In the interests of simplicity, I prefer to just have one thing to remember - lock appropriately!

EDIT: As noted in comments, if you can use higher level abstractions, that's great. And if you do use locking, be careful with it - document what you expect to be locked where, and acquire/release locks for as short a period as possible (more for correctness than performance). Avoid calling into unknown code while holding a lock, avoid nested locks etc.

In .NET 4 there's a lot more support for higher-level abstractions (including lock-free code). Either way, I still wouldn't recommend using the synchronized wrappers.

share|improve this answer
1  
Maybe add something about lock-free structures? They don't warrant a new reply. – Jonathan C Dickinson Feb 9 '09 at 5:58
    
@Jonathan: Not sure what there is to say about lock-free structures in this particular case. I generally don't bother trying to go lock-free - it involves a lot of head-scratching, and I can't remember ever being in a synchronization-bottleneck situation. – Jon Skeet Feb 9 '09 at 6:25
1  
@ElazarLeibovich: But the thread-safe container isn't really thread-safe for all purposes. It isolates individual operations, but what do you do when you need compound operations? Additionally, I often find that if I need to do something with a collection, I also need to do something with one of the other fields in the class. Of course, this assumes you're not going to expose the collection itself in your API - which would be a bad idea to start with. – Jon Skeet Apr 9 '12 at 7:24
1  
@ElazarLeibovich: It depends what the queue is being used for. You seem to be assuming a publisher/consumer scenario. These days I'd definitely use the .NET 4 concurrent queues for that sort of work - but bear in mind that this was back in 2008, and the OP really wasn't clear about the use of this queue. I stand by my approach of not using the synchronized wrappers. Depending on the situation there may well be other approaches than locking - but the synchronized wrappers are very rarely the best alternative, IMO. – Jon Skeet Apr 9 '12 at 7:59
1  
@Mathieson: What I object to is you going from my answer to the idea that I'm encouraging everything to be done under a lock the whole time. But if you think my answer is unhelpful, go ahead and downvote it and add your own answer. I'm done here. – Jon Skeet Nov 8 '13 at 22:13

There's a major problem with the Synchronized methods in the old collection library, in that they synchronize at too low a level of granularity (per method rather than per unit-of-work).

There's a classic race condition with a synchronized queue, shown below where you check the Count to see if it is safe to dequeue, but then the Dequeue method throws an exception indicating the queue is empty. This occurs because each individual operation is thread-safe, but the value of Count can change between when you query it and when you use the value.

object item;
if (queue.Count > 0)
{
    // at this point another thread dequeues the last item, and then
    // the next line will throw an InvalidOperationException...
    item = queue.Dequeue();
}

You can safely write this using a manual lock around the entire unit-of-work (i.e. checking the count and dequeueing the item) as follows:

object item;
lock (queue)
{
    if (queue.Count > 0)
    {
        item = queue.Dequeue();
    }
}

So as you can't safely dequeue anything from a synchronized queue, I wouldn't bother with it and would just use manual locking.

.NET 4.0 should have a whole bunch of properly implemented thread-safe collections, but that's still nearly a year away unfortunately.

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2  
+1 for mentioning granularity. – Marcel Nov 10 '10 at 8:53
1  
+1 for example showing th granularity – Firo Dec 8 '11 at 10:52

There's frequently a tension between demands for 'thread safe collections' and the requirement to perform multiple operations on the collection in an atomic fashion.

So Synchronized() gives you a collection which won't smash itself up if multiple threads add items to it simultaneously, but it doesn't magically give you a collection that knows that during an enumeration, nobody else must touch it.

As well as enumeration, common operations like "is this item already in the queue? No, then I'll add it" also require synchronisation which is wider than just the queue.

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This way we don't need to lock the queue just to find out it was empty.

object item;
if (queue.Count > 0)
{
  lock (queue)
  {
    if (queue.Count > 0)
    {
       item = queue.Dequeue();
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer

It seems clear to me that using a lock(...) {...} lock is the right answer.

To guarantee the thread safety of the Queue, all operations must be done through this wrapper only.

If other threads access the queue without using .Synchronized(), then you'll be up a creek - unless all your queue access is locked up.

share|improve this answer
    
The wrapper the article is talking about is the Synchronized() wrapper, not the lock() wrapper. – Jon Tackabury Dec 3 '08 at 21:22
    
Right - but using it in one thread doesn't make the other threads compliant. The point is that if you rely on .Synch() only, you'll have an easier time screwing yourself. – Greg Hurlman Dec 3 '08 at 22:37

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