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I have a some .py files that use spaces for indentation, and I'd like to convert them to tabs.

I could easily hack together something using regexes, but I can think of several edge cases where this approach could fail. Is there a tool that does this by parsing the file and determining the indentation level the same way the python interpreter does?

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6 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Since PEP-8 suggests that spaces a preferred over tabs, I'm curious why you're going from preferred (spaces) to not-preferred (tabs).

Wouldn't it be simpler to follow PEP-8 and leave them spaces?

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I would like to change them for consistency's sake. –  Corey Dec 3 '08 at 21:42
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@Federic Ramponi: Not against tabs. Recommend spaces. It's important to pick one, and spaces are easiest to get right. Some folks work okay with tabs, but spaces are guaranteed. –  S.Lott Dec 3 '08 at 21:44
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PEP-8 isn't "against" tabs, it's for consistency - and they chose spaces over tabs (I imagine the python-dev mailing list has a lot of discussion of why, such as mail.python.org/pipermail/python-list/2004-April/256325.html ) –  dbr Dec 3 '08 at 21:45
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PEP-8 makes a bad call on this issue, if only because it's decision in favor of spaces is entirely arbitrary. I personally prefer tabs from the simple reason that they work so well where spaces fail. Ex: see how you're forced to envision advanced editor features that treat 4 spaces as a single character for deletion. Why would I adopt PEP-8 if it makes coding more difficult for me? –  urig Apr 12 '11 at 16:50
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Tabs are superior to spaces because it allows many developers to view code the way they want to view it. If developer A wants his indentation to be = width of two spaces, he just sets his IDE's tab to equal 2 spaces in length. If developer B wants to tabs = 4 spaces width, then he also sets his IDE accordingly. Now each developer can open the same file and it will display each tab as 2 spaces for Developer A and 4 spaces for Developer B. Each developer can view the file as they want to view it without either developer having to be forced to view it a certain way. –  Jakobud Jan 10 '12 at 21:24
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Python includes a script for the opposite (tabs to spaces). It's C:\Python24\Tools\Scripts\reindent.py for me

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This is not available under Linux, even on py26. –  sorin Jul 22 '10 at 13:49
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If there are not many files to convert, you can open them in vim, and use the :retab command.

See the vim documentation for more information.

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:retab will swap tab with spaces, and :retab! will swap spaces with tab. 1 tab = 4 spaces, 4 spaces = 1 tab, depending on your tab setting.

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+1, didn't know it worked both ways; it uses the tabstop setting, presumably? –  James Feb 14 '10 at 0:49
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In emacs, M-x tabify will convert spaces to tabs where possible. You'll probably want to set the tab-width variable appropriately.

I don't know if this addresses your concern that spaces be interpreted in the same way as the python interpreter, but you could always load up python-mode and use M-x indent-region.

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If you use Linux, you might also play around with unexpand:

Convert blanks in each FILE to tabs, writing to standard output. With no FILE, or when FILE is -, read standard input.

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You'll find a win32 build if you want. –  sorin Jul 22 '10 at 13:50
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