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I am using SQLite in a Java application through Zentus. In this context I need to save and query Java long values in my database. Coming from other RDBMS I created the table as following to store long values:

CREATE TABLE myTable (id INTEGER PRIMARY_KEY, longValue LONG)

This solution produces the excepted behavior but after reading the SQLite documentation on data types I understood that my LONG type has the same effect than using TEXT => longValue is stored as text.

I then decided to change this to INTEGER (which length is variable and can store up to 64 bit integers which is the length of Java long) in order to have cleaner code and may be to save some disk space and to increase performances because my longValues are inserted and queried as long.

After comparing the performances and the size of the created databases I am not able to see any difference between:

CREATE TABLE myTable (id INTEGER PRIMARY_KEY, longValue LONG)

and

CREATE TABLE myTable (id INTEGER PRIMARY_KEY, longValue INTEGER)

Any comments, experiences or feelings on the subject?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 14 down vote accepted

In SQLite, data types are per-value, not per-column. So when you insert integers, they're stored as integers regardless of the column type.

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3  
Thus I am wondering: why column types exist ? –  Manuel Selva Aug 2 '10 at 13:26
4  
Columns have "affinities"; for instance, a text column that gets passed a numeric string should store it as text, preserving the formatting (decimal places, etc). Whereas a numeric column that is passed a numeric string will convert it to a number before storing it, so "10.00" would be later returned as just "10". Since a LONG column has the default numeric affinity, changing the type to INTEGER doesn't change anything. –  Tangent 128 Aug 2 '10 at 13:30
    
The answer fron SQlite web site is: "In order to maximize compatibility between SQLite and other database engines, SQLite supports the concept of "type affinity" on columns. The type affinity of a column is the recommended type for data stored in that column. The important idea here is that the type is recommended, not required. Any column can still store any type of data. It is just that some columns, given the choice, will prefer to use one storage class over another" But what "will prefer" means ?? Is there any impact on performances and databases sizes ? –  Manuel Selva Aug 2 '10 at 13:31
    
@Tangent, many thanks for your help. One more question, I was thinking LONG columns having TEXT affinity. Where did you get the affinity for LONG columns, in a web document or is it possible to ask it to sqlite ? –  Manuel Selva Aug 2 '10 at 13:33
3  
LONG isn't recognized by SQLite, but section 2.1 in the datatype documentation says that unrecognized types default to numeric. –  Tangent 128 Aug 2 '10 at 13:37

After looking at performances and size of the created databases I am not able to see any difference between:

There isn't any difference. INTEGER has integer affinity and LONG has numeric affinity. And, http://www.sqlite.org/datatype3.html says:

A column that uses INTEGER affinity behaves the same as a column with NUMERIC affinity. The difference between INTEGER and NUMERIC affinity is only evident in a CAST expression.

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Do you mean that in a cast a numeric operates like a "floating-point" type? –  Pacerier Nov 11 '11 at 22:13

SQLite chooses automatically the right size. From http://www.sqlite.org/datatype3.html:

INTEGER. The value is a signed integer, stored in 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, or 8 bytes depending on the magnitude of the value.

SQLite uses dynamic types and is schema free.

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Thanks for the quick answer Christian. I already read that, and it's why I was thinking that my database size with INTEGER will be smaller than the one with LONG because encoding a long in "text" (utf8 I think) should be more expensive than using variable length integer. isn't it ? How can I explain the same size for the 2 databases ? –  Manuel Selva Aug 2 '10 at 13:24
2  
schema free?? –  J. Polfer Aug 2 '10 at 13:30
    
Not "schema free" in the meaning of NoSQL databases (key/values) systems of course. The first link I gave and sqlite.org/different.html explains the typing in more detail. –  Christian Ullenboom Aug 2 '10 at 13:55
CREATE TABLE ex2(
  a VARCHAR(10),
  b NVARCHAR(15),
  c TEXT,
  d INTEGER,
  e FLOAT,
  f BOOLEAN,
  g CLOB,
  h BLOB,
  i TIMESTAMP,
  j NUMERIC(10,5)
  k VARYING CHARACTER (24),
  l NATIONAL VARYING CHARACTER(16)
);
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