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Take a look at this code:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class A
{
private:
    int privatefield;
protected:
    int protectedfield;
public:
    int publicfield;
};

class B: private A
{
private:
    A a;
public:
    void test()
    {
        cout << this->publicfield << this->protectedfield << endl;
    }
    void test2()
    {
        cout << a.publicfield << a.protectedfield << endl;
    }
};

int main()
{
    B b;
    b.test();
    b.test2();
    return 0;
}

B has access to this->protectedfield but hasn't to a.protectedfield. Why? Yet B is subclass of A.

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4  
No, B is not a subclass of A. It would be if you used public inheritance. –  anon Aug 2 '10 at 14:07
    
Here is an explanation how it works. –  Kirill V. Lyadvinsky Aug 2 '10 at 14:28
    
Why? Private inheritance means that all inherited fields and methods will become private so they will be accessible only in derived class. –  l245c4l Aug 2 '10 at 14:58
    
+1, because it looks like a beginner question, but many of the answers or comments are wrong. I did a test: private or public inheritance does not make a difference. –  IanH Aug 2 '10 at 15:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

B has access only to the protected fields in itself or other objects of type B (or possibly derived from B, if it sees them as B-s).

B does not have access to the protected fields of any other unrelated objects in the same inheritance tree.

An Apple has no right to access the internals of an Orange, even if they are both Fruits.

class Fruit
{
    protected: int sweetness;
};

class Apple: public Fruit
{
    public: Apple() { this->sweetness = 100; }
};

class Orange: public Fruit
{
public:
    void evil_function(Fruit& f)
    {
        f.sweetness = -100;  //doesn't compile!!
    }
};

int main()
{
    Apple apple;
    Orange orange;
    orange.evil_function(apple);
}
share|improve this answer
    
So what it means is half of explanations on the Internet are wrong? Because they say that subclass has access to protected members of superclass which is untrue. It has access to them because it HAS them right? So protected means that they can be copied to subclass same as public but cannot be accessed from outside of class. Is that correct? –  l245c4l Aug 2 '10 at 14:59
    
Your answer is right, but you don't need the apple class at all. (As you say, the compiler complains about the protected access in the Orange class). Just say: An orange cannot change the internals of another fruit - even if it is also an orange. –  IanH Aug 2 '10 at 15:20
1  
An Orange can access the protected internals of another Orange if it sees it as Orange. - Yes, in the example, if evil_function was passed an instance of Orange instead of Apple, it would still be a compilation error, because there is no guarantee that Oranges will be passed always. If evil_function accepted an Orange&, instead of Fruit& , it would be legal for it to modify the protected member of the argument. –  UncleBens Aug 2 '10 at 16:59

this->protectedfield: B enherits of A, this means protectedfield is a property of itself now, so it is able to access it.

a.protectedfield: a is a member of class B, this member has the protectedfield variable which is protected. B cannot touch it, because protected means only access from A within.

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Protected means access from A and subclass of A. And B is a subclass of A. –  l245c4l Aug 2 '10 at 14:14
    
@l245c4l: B is not a subclass of A because you are using private, not public inheritance. Public inheritance means 'is-a', private inheritance means 'is-implemented-in-terms-of'. –  TheJuice Aug 2 '10 at 14:19
1  
The public/private inheritance is a red-hearing. There is no inter-object access privileges each object only exposes its public interface to other objects (no matter what the class). Friendship is the only way to subvert the access specifiers. Note: class X is a friend of itself. –  Loki Astari Aug 2 '10 at 14:29

Lets break the whole code in small parts.Copy and paste this two code and try to compile!!!!

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
class A
{
private:
    int privatefield;
protected:
    int protectedfield;
public:
    int publicfield;
};

int main()
{
    A a;
    cout<<a.publicfield;
    cout<<a.privatefield;/////not possible ! private data can not be seen by an object of that class
    cout<<a.protectedfield;////again not possible. protected data is like privete data except it can be inherited by another.If inherited as private then they are private,if as protected then protected and if as public then also protected.
}

Now B inherits class A as private

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class A
{
private:
    int privatefield;
protected:
    int protectedfield;
public:
    int publicfield;
};

class B: private A
{
private:
    A a;
public:
    void test()
    {
        cout << this->publicfield << this->protectedfield << endl;
    }
    void test2()
    {
        cout << a.publicfield << endl;
    }
};
int main()
{
    /*Now B will have both public and protected data as private!!!!
    That means
     B now looks like this class


     Class B
     {  

        private:
        int protectedfield;
        int publicfield;
     }

     As we have discussed private/protected data can not be accessed by object of the class
     so you you can not do things like this

     B b;
     b.protectedfield; or b.publicfield;

     */
    B b;
    b.privatefield;////Error !!!
    b.protectedfield/////error!!!!
}

Thanks!

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