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I've tried Google, but I can't find the answer to this simple question. I hate myself for not being able to figure this out, but here we go.

How do I write an if statement with or in it?

For example:

if raw_input=="dog" or "cat" or "small bird":
    print "You can have this animal in your house"
else:
    print "I'm afraid you can't have this animal in your house."
share|improve this question
    
your example code is "or"ing the strings, which is not a legal operation. –  marr75 Aug 2 '10 at 14:44
2  
@marr It's actually doing (raw_input == 'dog') or 'cat' or 'small bird', so it will return True if raw_input == 'dog', or cat otherwise –  Michael Mrozek Aug 2 '10 at 14:45
    
Oops, you're right, that will always execute. It is or'ing the strings, but this will evaluate to "cat" everytime and since cat is a string and is not empty, it will count as true. –  marr75 Aug 3 '10 at 4:41

5 Answers 5

up vote 11 down vote accepted

If you want to use or, you need to repeat the whole expression each time:

if raw_input == "dog" or raw_input == "cat" or raw_input == "small bird":

But a better way to do this particular comparison is with in:

if raw_input in ("dog", "cat", "small bird"):
share|improve this answer

You can put the allowed animals into a tuple then use in to search for a match

if raw_input() in ("dog", "cat", "small bird"):
    print "You can have this animal in your house"
else:
    print "I'm afraid you can't have this animal in your house."

You can also use a set here, but I doubt it would improve performance for such a small number of allowed animals

desired_animal = raw_input()
allowed_animals = set(("dog", "cat", "small bird"))
if desired_animal in allowed_animals:
    print "You can have this animal in your house"
else:
    print "I'm afraid you can't have this animal in your house."
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 Most pythonic solution presented, could be made more functional, though. –  marr75 Aug 2 '10 at 14:43
5  
@marr It was a pretty trivial question, I don't think we need to start refactoring it to make it more "functional" –  Michael Mrozek Aug 2 '10 at 14:44
    
@marr75, please feel free to post a more functional answer :) –  John La Rooy Aug 2 '10 at 14:50
    
@Michael I didn't mean it needed to be, it just seems like "pythonic" is starting to have more functional programming connotations these days, could be just my opinion. @gnibbler the only functional code I can think of (map and then reduce) would be harder to read, probably. –  marr75 Aug 3 '10 at 4:37
if (raw_input=="dog") or (raw_input == "cat") or (raw_input == "small bird"):
  print You can have this animal in your house
else:
  print I'm afraid you can't have this animal in your house.

or

if raw_input in ("dog", "cat", "small bird"):
  print You can have this animal in your house
else:
  print I'm afraid you can't have this animal in your house.
share|improve this answer
    
Not very "pythonic", i've written code like this but I wouldn't recommend it to a new programmer. –  marr75 Aug 2 '10 at 14:42
    
assuming the raw_input is supposed to be the function call raw_input() you would not want to call it 3 times –  John La Rooy Aug 2 '10 at 14:43

You can do it this way

 if raw_input=="dog" or raw_input=="cat" or raw_input=="small bird":
share|improve this answer
goodanimals= ("dog" ,"cat","small bird")
print("You can have this animal in your house" if raw_input().strip().lower() in goodanimals
      else "I'm afraid you can't have this animal in your house.")
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