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I have numbers like 1100, 1002, 1022 etc. I would like to have the individual digits, for example for the first number 1100 I want to have 1, 1, 0, 0.

How can I get it in Java?

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14 Answers 14

To do this, you will use the % (mod) operator.

int number; // = some int

while (number > 0) {
    print( number % 10);
    number = number / 10;
}

The mod operator will give you the remainder of doing int division on a number.

So,

10012 % 10 = 2

Because:

10012 / 10 = 1001, remainder 2

Note: As Paul noted, this will give you the numbers in reverse order. You will need to push them onto a stack and pop them off in reverse order.

Code to print the numbers in the correct order:

int number; // = and int
LinkedList<Integer> stack = new LinkedList<Integer>();
while (number > 0) {
    stack.push( number % 10 );
    number = number / 10;
}

while (!stack.isEmpty()) {
    print(stack.pop());
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your reply. What is the value of the num? What does it stands for? – Edy Moore Aug 2 '10 at 15:40
1  
This will get you the numbers in the wrong order, however, so you'll have to be sure and push them onto a stack or just put them in an array in reverse order. – Paul Tomblin Aug 2 '10 at 15:42
2  
Note that this gives them right-to-left. (The OP's example shows them left-to-right). Simple enought to handle, but it should be noted. – James Curran Aug 2 '10 at 15:43
    
@Kap, it was a typo. It should have been number. You should also look at the note posted at the bottom of the answer. – jjnguy Aug 2 '10 at 15:45
1  
@Don, in practice, no. I would not favor this. It is way faster than the string based version though. I would look at Marimuthu's answer though for some fast and short code. – jjnguy Aug 2 '10 at 18:25

Convert it to String and use String#toCharArray() or String#split().

String number = String.valueOf(someInt);

char[] digits1 = number.toCharArray();
// or:
String[] digits2 = number.split("(?<=.)");

In case you're already on Java 8 and you happen to want to do some aggregate operations on it afterwards, consider using String#chars() to get an IntStream out of it.

IntStream chars = number.chars();
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2  
This is the quick and dirty way. – jjnguy Aug 2 '10 at 15:40
5  
With split(""), the first item in the array is "". Use other regex, like split("(?<=.)"). – True Soft Aug 2 '10 at 15:40
1  
@jjn: That's right :) @True Soft: thanks for regex improvement, I edited it in. – BalusC Aug 2 '10 at 15:41
3  
toCharArray is MUCH faster than split. I just put both in a loop 1000 times and toCharArray took 20ms and split took 1021ms. I also did it mathematically using divide by ten with mod (%) and it took 50ms doing it that way, so toCharArray appears to be faster than the other two. – Jerry Destremps Dec 15 '13 at 13:21
1  
Edit: I just did it again, this time with longer loops to be sure (10,000 iterations). toCharArray is about 100 times faster than split, and toCharArray is about 5 times faster than modulus math method. – Jerry Destremps Dec 15 '13 at 13:37

How about this?

public static void printDigits(int num) {
    if(num / 10 > 0) {
        printDigits(num / 10);
    }
    System.out.printf("%d ", num % 10);
}

or instead of printing to the console, we can collect it in an array of integers and then print the array:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Integer[] digits = getDigits(12345);
    System.out.println(Arrays.toString(digits));
}

public static Integer[] getDigits(int num) {
    List<Integer> digits = new ArrayList<Integer>();
    collectDigits(num, digits);
    return digits.toArray(new Integer[]{});
}

private static void collectDigits(int num, List<Integer> digits) {
    if(num / 10 > 0) {
        collectDigits(num / 10, digits);
    }
    digits.add(num % 10);
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's a good way to print things in the correct order using mod. +1 – jjnguy Aug 2 '10 at 17:41
    
This is beautiful. I was thinking: "There has to be a way to reverse the order without using a Collection...." +1 – bobndrew Aug 4 '10 at 8:07
// could be any num this is a randomly generated one
int num = (int) (Math.random() * 1000);

// this will return each number to a int variable
int num1 = num % 10;
int num2 = num / 10 % 10;
int num3 = num /100 % 10;

// you could continue this pattern for 4,5,6 digit numbers
// dont need to print you could then use the new int values man other ways
System.out.print(num1);
System.out.print("\n" + num2);
System.out.print("\n" + num3);
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I haven't seen anybody use this method, but it worked for me and is short and sweet:

int num = 5542;
String number = String.valueOf(num);
for(int i = 0; i < number.length(); i++) {
    int j = Character.digit(number.charAt(i), 10);
    System.out.println("digit: " + j);
}

This will output:

digit: 5
digit: 5
digit: 4
digit: 2
share|improve this answer

Easier way I think is to convert the number to string and use substring to extract and then convert to integer.

Something like this:

int digits1 =Integer.parseInt( String.valueOf(201432014).substring(0,4));
    System.out.println("digits are: "+digits1);

ouput is 2014

share|improve this answer

Integer.toString(1100) gives you the integer as a string. Integer.toString(1100).getBytes() to get an array of bytes of the individual digits.

Edit:

You can convert the character digits into numeric digits, thus:

  String string = Integer.toString(1234);
  int[] digits = new int[string.length()];

  for(int i = 0; i<string.length(); ++i){
    digits[i] = Integer.parseInt(string.substring(i, i+1));
  }
  System.out.println("digits:" + Arrays.toString(digits));
share|improve this answer
    
This is slightly misleading. This will give you an array of bytes representing the char '1' or '0'. The byte values wont be 1, or 0. – jjnguy Aug 2 '10 at 15:56
    
Misleading? That's a little harsh. The question was ambiguous. It really depends what he wants to do with the digits. You're assuming that he wants to perform calculations. My answer assumes text processing. Either assumption is partially correct, but it was not my intent to mislead. – Don Branson Aug 2 '10 at 17:05
    
I guess I feel it is misleading because you get an array of bytes, which I think of numbers not characters. – jjnguy Aug 2 '10 at 18:42
    
@Justin - Ah, okay. I don't automatically associate bytes as not characters. In my assembly days, I'd increment 'a' to get 'b', iterating through the alphabet - so sometimes bytes were simultaneously both. Of course, high-level languages and UTF render that all moot. – Don Branson Aug 2 '10 at 18:57

I think this will be the most useful way to get digits:

public int[] getDigitsOf(int num)
{        
    int digitCount = Integer.toString(num).length();

    if (num < 0) 
        digitCount--;           

    int[] result = new int[digitCount];

    while (digitCount-- >0) {
        result[digitCount] = num % 10;
        num /= 10;
    }        
    return result;
}

Then you can get digits in a simple way:

int number = 12345;
int[] digits = getDigitsOf(number);

for (int i = 0; i < digits.length; i++) {
    System.out.println(digits[i]);
}

or more simply:

int number = 12345;
for (int i = 0; i < getDigitsOf(number).length; i++) {
    System.out.println(  getDigitsOf(number)[i]  );
}

Notice the last method calls getDigitsOf method too much time. So it will be slower. You should create an int array and then call the getDigitsOf method once, just like in second code block.

In the following code, you can reverse to process. This code puts all digits together to make the number:

public int digitsToInt(int[] digits)
{
    int digitCount = digits.length;
    int result = 0;

    for (int i = 0; i < digitCount; i++) {
        result = result * 10;
        result += digits[i];
    }

    return result;
}

Both methods I have provided works for negative numbers too.

share|improve this answer

This uses the modulo 10 method to figure out each digit in a number greater than 0, then this will reverse the order of the array. This is assuming you are not using "0" as a starting digit.

This is modified to take in user input. This array is originally inserted backwards, so I had to use the Collections.reverse() call to put it back into the user's order.

    Scanner scanNumber = new Scanner(System.in);
    int userNum = scanNumber.nextInt(); // user's number

    // divides each digit into its own element within an array
    List<Integer> checkUserNum = new ArrayList<Integer>();
    while(userNum > 0) {
        checkUserNum.add(userNum % 10);
        userNum /= 10;
    }

    Collections.reverse(checkUserNum); // reverses the order of the array

    System.out.print(checkUserNum);
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Just to build on the subject, here's how to confirm that the number is a palindromic integer in Java:

public static boolean isPalindrome(int input) {
List<Integer> intArr = new ArrayList();
int procInt = input;

int i = 0;
while(procInt > 0) {
    intArr.add(procInt%10);
    procInt = procInt/10;
    i++;
}

int y = 0;
int tmp = 0;
int count = 0;
for(int j:intArr) {
    if(j == 0 && count == 0) {
    break;
    }

    tmp = j + (tmp*10);
    count++;
}

if(input != tmp)
    return false;

return true;
}

I'm sure I can simplify this algo further. Yet, this is where I am. And it has worked under all of my test cases.

I hope this helps someone.

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int number = 12344444; // or it Could be any valid number

int temp = 0;
int divider = 1;

for(int i =1; i< String.valueOf(number).length();i++)
 {

    divider = divider * 10;

}

while (divider >0) {

    temp = number / divider;
    number = number % divider;
    System.out.print(temp +" ");
    divider = divider/10;
}
share|improve this answer
    
12344444 is to big to be an int. – Beppe Sep 29 '13 at 0:01
    
@Beppe 12344444 is not too big to be an int. Java docs claims the following For int, from -2147483648 to 2147483647, inclusive Though to know for sure on your system you could use System.out.println(Integer.MAX_VALUE); to find out the max_value that is supported in your java.lang package – OrwellHindenberg Jul 29 '14 at 20:24

I wrote a program that demonstrates how to separate the digits of an integer using a more simple and understandable approach that does not involve arrays, recursions, and all that fancy schmancy. Here is my code:

int year = sc.nextInt(), temp = year, count = 0;

while (temp>0)
{
  count++;
  temp = temp / 10;
}

double num = Math.pow(10, count-1);
int i = (int)num;

for (;i>0;i/=10)
{
  System.out.println(year/i%10);
}

Suppose your input is the integer 123, the resulting output will be as follows:

1
2
3
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Try this:

int num= 4321
int first  =  num % 10;
int second =  ( num - first ) % 100 / 10;
int third  =  ( num - first - second ) % 1000 / 100;
int fourth =  ( num - first - second - third ) % 10000 / 1000;

You will get first = 1, second = 2, third = 3 and fourth = 4 ....

share|improve this answer
    
This is less utilitarian and elegant than the general methods listed above, nor is it different in principle than other answers using %. It adds little value. – Shawn Mehan Oct 15 '15 at 17:10
import java.util.Scanner;

public class SeparatingDigits {

    public static void main( String[] args )
    {

        System.out.print( "Enter the digit to print separately :- ");
        Scanner scan = new Scanner( System.in );

        int element1 = scan.nextInt();
        int divider;

        if( ( element1 > 9999 ) && ( element1 <= 99999 ) )
        {
            divider = 10000;
        }
        else if( ( element1 > 999 ) && ( element1 <= 9999 ) )
        {
            divider = 1000;
        }
        else if ( ( element1 > 99) && ( element1 <= 999 ) )
        {
            divider = 100;
        }
        else if( ( element1 > 9 ) && ( element1 <= 99 ) )
        {
            divider = 10;
        }
        else 
        {
            divider = 1;
        }

        quotientFinder( element1, divider );




    }

     public static void quotientFinder( int elementValue, int dividerValue )
     {
         for( int count = 1;  dividerValue != 0; count++)
         {
            int quotientValue = elementValue / dividerValue ;
            elementValue = elementValue % dividerValue ;
            System.out.printf( "%d  ", quotientValue );

            dividerValue /= 10;

         }
     }
    }

Without using arrays and Strings . ( digits 1-99999 )

output :

Enter the digit to print separately :- 12345

1 2 3 4 5

share|improve this answer
    
There's got to be a way to more efficiently and dynamically determine divider. – ZX9 Sep 16 '15 at 14:11

protected by Jason C Nov 25 '14 at 15:33

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