Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a table that has 3 columns representing the stops in a bus route.

ID
stop_name
stop_order

I am wanting to return a list of stops starting with the current stop (which I know). So if the current stop is stop number 5 then what is returned will be as follows:

stop_order
5
6
7
8
1
2
3
4

I tried:

Select * from routes where stop_order >= 3 and route = 'Red' 
Union 
Select * from routes where stop_order < 3 and route = 'Red

and it works if the data was entered into the table in the order of the stops. If it wasn't then it returns the data in the order it was entered.

share|improve this question
1  
what if you just add 'order by stop_order' to each query in the union? –  Fosco Aug 2 '10 at 17:06
1  
Also, if you're going to use a union, you want UNION ALL here. –  Justin K Aug 2 '10 at 17:11
    
It is a MySQL database –  Brian Aug 2 '10 at 17:14

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can do this in one query to save on table accesses by using case statements.

select * from routes
where route = 'Red'
order by case when stop_order >= 3 then 0 else 1 end, stop_order
;

Corrected!

share|improve this answer
    
that is just returning them ordered by the ID starting at the first stop. –  Brian Aug 2 '10 at 17:17
    
What about CASE WHEN stop_order >= 5 then stop_order - 100 else stop_order? –  Marcus Adams Aug 2 '10 at 17:25
    
sorry, i've updated the query now. The case statement allows us to order based on if its after or before the current stop, before reverting to the natural order of the stop numbers. –  a'r Aug 2 '10 at 17:26
    
The correct answer without the need of a union (assuming the bus is driving in circles), case when stop_order >= 3 then 0 else 1 end could just simply be rewritten to stop_order < 3 though. –  Wrikken Aug 2 '10 at 17:30
    
works great, thanks. –  Brian Aug 2 '10 at 17:37

Try Order by stop_order to both the sql statements. By default the order by will order the results in ascending order

share|improve this answer

I think Patrick almost had it:

(SELECT * FROM routes WHERE stop_order >= 5 ORDER BY stop_order)
UNION ALL
(SELECT * FROM routes WHERE stop_order < 5 ORDER BY stop_order)
share|improve this answer

Using this would work:

(Select * from routes where stop_order >= 3 and route = 'Red' Order By ID)
Union 
(Select * from routes where stop_order < 3 and route = 'Red' Order By ID)

Edit: added forgotten parenthesis.

share|improve this answer
1  
SQL in general only allows one ORDER BY, for the entire result set after the UNION –  OMG Ponies Aug 2 '10 at 17:09
    
I am getting #1221 - Incorrect usage of UNION and ORDER BY when I try that –  Brian Aug 2 '10 at 17:12

a'r answer is correct for the question asked. However I want to further optimize the code and also make it possible to use DISTINCT in the query which isnt possible with the solution given.

After looking around a bit more I found out you can move the CASE WHEN statement into the select instead of in the order as coded below:

select distinct route, case when stop_order >= 3 then 0 else 1 end as sorted_by from routes
where route = 'Red'
order by sorted_by, stop_order
;

Hope this helps a few others having problems with ordering and also using DISTINCT.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.