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What is the nicest/shortest way to pad a string with zeroes to the left, so the string length has a specific length?

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related stackoverflow.com/questions/3258330/… –  endolith Apr 29 '12 at 17:08

10 Answers 10

up vote 551 down vote accepted

Strings:

>>> n = '4'
>>> print n.zfill(3)
>>> '004'

And for numbers:

>>> n = 4
>>> print '%03d' % n
>>> 004
>>> print format(4, '03') # python >= 2.6
>>> 004
>>> print "{0:03d}".format(4)  # python >= 2.6
>>> 004
>>> print("{0:03d}".format(4))  # python 3
>>> 004

String formatting documentation.

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34  
% formatting is deprecated in favor of string.format –  Jace Browning Mar 16 '12 at 13:06
1  
To follow up on Jace, a direct link to some useful examples (in particular, note that string.format can take positional arguments, e.g. "Test{ing}".format(ing="ed")): docs.python.org/library/string.html#formatexamples –  kungphu Aug 30 '12 at 23:23
1  
I've updated the answer, but this is SO, feel free to edit if you see something not quite right :) –  Harley Holcombe Aug 31 '12 at 5:07
54  
It's a myth that '%'-formatting is deprecated. It isn't going anywhere. –  Ned Batchelder Oct 28 '12 at 16:17
3  
I consider that zfill is better overall. Therefore, with numbers: print str(4).zfill(3) # Good answer! –  caligari Nov 22 '12 at 18:28

Just use the rjust method of the string object.

This example will make a string of 10 characters long, padding as necessary.

>>> t = 'test'
>>> t.rjust(10, '0')
>>> '000000test'
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8  
+1 since zfill forces the use of '0', and rjust defaults to ' ', but as shown accepts an optional pad letter. Good one! –  synthesizerpatel Sep 22 '12 at 23:49
4  
That's an excellent solution! It also implies that "".ljust() also exists, allowing to pad zeros on any side! –  PhilMacKay Dec 9 '13 at 17:13
3  
You can also use "foo".center(42,"-") which centers the text as well as possible between -s. –  Forest Ka Feb 16 at 3:04

For numbers:

print "%05d" % number

See also: Python: String formatting.

EDIT: It's worth noting that as of yesterday December 3rd, 2008, this method of formatting is deprecated in favour of the format string method:

print("{0:05d}".format(number)) # or
print(format(number, "05d"))

See PEP 3101 for details.

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PEP 3101 does not state that % is deprecated in any way. –  zwirbeltier Nov 29 at 16:20
    
@zwirbeltier PEP 3101 explains how to use format, is what I meant. –  Konrad Rudolph Nov 29 at 16:33
    
The "EDIT" still states "… this method of formatting is deprecated …". –  zwirbeltier Nov 29 at 16:38
    
@zwirbeltier Yes, and it is deprecated. But this isn't directly stated in the PEP. The documentation, however, says to use format instead, and people generally interpret this as intent to deprecate. –  Konrad Rudolph Nov 29 at 16:43

str(n).zfill(width) will work with strings, ints, floats... and is Python 2.x and 3.x compatible:

>>> n = 3
>>> str(n).zfill(5)
'00003'
>>> n = '3'
>>> str(n).zfill(5)
'00003'
>>> n = '3.0'
>>> str(n).zfill(5)
'003.0'
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>>> '99'.zfill(5)
'00099'
>>> '99'.rjust(5,'0')
'00099'

if you want the opposite:

>>> '99'.ljust(5,'0')
'99000'
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width = 10
x = 5
print "%0*d" % (width, x)
> 0000000005

See the print documentation for all the exciting details!

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2  
This won't work in Python 3.x –  Johnsyweb Jun 1 '11 at 4:41
10  
True, but since that answer was written 3 months before Guido wrote this (docs.python.org/release/3.0.1/whatsnew/3.0.html) I think I can be forgiven for not predicting the future. –  Peter Rowell Jun 1 '11 at 4:51
7  
For sure. I wasn't saying that it was incorrect, purely for the information of people stumbling across the the answer today (as I just did). –  Johnsyweb Jun 1 '11 at 4:58

Works in both Python 2 and Python 3:

>>> "{:0>2}".format("1")  # Works for both numbers and strings.
'01'
>>> "{:02}".format(1)  # Only works for numbers.
'01'
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>>> width = 4
>>> x = 5
>>> print("%0*d" %(width,x))
>>> 00005

this will work in python 3.x

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You could also repeat "0", prepend it to str(n) and get the rightmost width slice. Quick and dirty little expression.

def pad_left(n, width, pad="0"):
    return ((pad * width) + str(n))[-width:]
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This only works for positive numbers though. It gets a little more complicated if you want negatives too. But this expression is good for quick and dirty work, if you don't mind that kind of thing. –  J Lacar May 6 '13 at 22:06

GREAT for zip codes saved as integers!

>>> a = 6340
>>> b = 90210
>>> print '%05d' % a
06340
>>> print '%05d' % b
90210
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2  
Not in Python 3.x it's not. –  Johnsyweb Jun 1 '11 at 4:41
1  
You are correct, and I like your suggestion with zfill better anyhow –  user221014 Jun 11 '11 at 3:01
    
zip codes saved as integers is a fail! :) –  Anentropic Aug 21 at 8:52

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