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What is the nicest/shortest way to pad a string with zeroes to the left, so the string length has a specific length?

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related stackoverflow.com/questions/3258330/… –  endolith Apr 29 '12 at 17:08

10 Answers 10

up vote 506 down vote accepted

Strings:

>>> n = '4'
>>> print n.zfill(3)
>>> '004'

And for numbers:

>>> n = 4
>>> print '%03d' % n
>>> 004
>>> print format(4, '03') # python >= 2.6
>>> 004
>>> print "{0:03d}".format(4)  # python >= 2.6
>>> 004
>>> print("{0:03d}".format(4))  # python 3
>>> 004

String formatting documentation.

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33  
% formatting is deprecated in favor of string.format –  Jace Browning Mar 16 '12 at 13:06
1  
To follow up on Jace, a direct link to some useful examples (in particular, note that string.format can take positional arguments, e.g. "Test{ing}".format(ing="ed")): docs.python.org/library/string.html#formatexamples –  kungphu Aug 30 '12 at 23:23
1  
I've updated the answer, but this is SO, feel free to edit if you see something not quite right :) –  Harley Holcombe Aug 31 '12 at 5:07
48  
It's a myth that '%'-formatting is deprecated. It isn't going anywhere. –  Ned Batchelder Oct 28 '12 at 16:17
3  
I consider that zfill is better overall. Therefore, with numbers: print str(4).zfill(3) # Good answer! –  caligari Nov 22 '12 at 18:28

Just use the rjust method of the string object.

This example will make a string of 10 characters long, padding as necessary.

>>> t = 'test'
>>> t.rjust(10, '0')
>>> '000000test'
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8  
+1 since zfill forces the use of '0', and rjust defaults to ' ', but as shown accepts an optional pad letter. Good one! –  synthesizerpatel Sep 22 '12 at 23:49
4  
That's an excellent solution! It also implies that "".ljust() also exists, allowing to pad zeros on any side! –  PhilMacKay Dec 9 '13 at 17:13
3  
You can also use "foo".center(42,"-") which centers the text as well as possible between -s. –  Forest Ka Feb 16 at 3:04

For numbers:

print "%05d" % number

See also: Python: String formatting.

EDIT: It's worth noting that as of yesterday December 3rd, 2008, this method of formatting is deprecated in favour of the format string method:

print("{0:05d}".format(number)) # or
print(format(number, "05d"))

See PEP 3101 for details.

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str(n).zfill(width) will work with strings, ints, floats... and is Python 2.x and 3.x compatible:

>>> n = 3
>>> str(n).zfill(5)
'00003'
>>> n = '3'
>>> str(n).zfill(5)
'00003'
>>> n = '3.0'
>>> str(n).zfill(5)
'003.0'
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>>> '99'.zfill(5)
'00099'
>>> '99'.rjust(5,'0')
'00099'

if you want the opposite:

>>> '99'.ljust(5,'0')
'99000'
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width = 10
x = 5
print "%0*d" % (width, x)
> 0000000005

See the print documentation for all the exciting details!

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2  
This won't work in Python 3.x –  Johnsyweb Jun 1 '11 at 4:41
10  
True, but since that answer was written 3 months before Guido wrote this (docs.python.org/release/3.0.1/whatsnew/3.0.html) I think I can be forgiven for not predicting the future. –  Peter Rowell Jun 1 '11 at 4:51
7  
For sure. I wasn't saying that it was incorrect, purely for the information of people stumbling across the the answer today (as I just did). –  Johnsyweb Jun 1 '11 at 4:58

Works in both Python 2 and Python 3:

>>> "{:0>2}".format("1")  # Works for both numbers and strings.
'01'
>>> "{:02}".format(1)  # Only works for numbers.
'01'
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>>> width = 4
>>> x = 5
>>> print("%0*d" %(width,x))
>>> 00005

this will work in python 3.x

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You could also repeat "0", prepend it to str(n) and get the rightmost width slice. Quick and dirty little expression.

def pad_left(n, width, pad="0"):
    return ((pad * width) + str(n))[-width:]
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This only works for positive numbers though. It gets a little more complicated if you want negatives too. But this expression is good for quick and dirty work, if you don't mind that kind of thing. –  J Lacar May 6 '13 at 22:06

GREAT for zip codes saved as integers!

>>> a = 6340
>>> b = 90210
>>> print '%05d' % a
06340
>>> print '%05d' % b
90210
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2  
Not in Python 3.x it's not. –  Johnsyweb Jun 1 '11 at 4:41
1  
You are correct, and I like your suggestion with zfill better anyhow –  user221014 Jun 11 '11 at 3:01
    
zip codes saved as integers is a fail! :) –  Anentropic Aug 21 at 8:52

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