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I was wondering how I'd get rid of periods in a filename if i have a filename like:

Test....1.txt to look like Test 1.txt ? I do NOT want files like : 1.0.1 Test.txt to be touched. Only files with consecutive periods should be replaced with a space. Any ideas?

This is my current code but as you can see, it replaces every period aside from periods in extension names:

 public void DoublepCleanUp(List<string> doublepFiles)
    {
        Regex regExPattern2 = new Regex(@"\s{2,}");
        Regex regExPattern4 = new Regex(@"\.+");
        Regex regExPattern3 = new Regex(@"\.(?=.*\.)");
        string replace = " ";
        List<string> doublep = new List<string>();
        var filesCount = new Dictionary<string, int>();

        try
        {
            foreach (string invalidFiles in doublepFiles)
            {
                string fileOnly = System.IO.Path.GetFileName(invalidFiles);
                string pathOnly = System.IO.Path.GetDirectoryName(fileOnly);

                if (!System.IO.File.Exists(fileOnly))
                {
                    string filewithDoublePName = System.IO.Path.GetFileName(invalidFiles);
                    string doublepPath = System.IO.Path.GetDirectoryName(invalidFiles);
                    string name = System.IO.Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(invalidFiles);
                    //string newName = name.Replace(".", " ");
                    string newName = regExPattern4.Replace(name, replace);
                    string newName2 = regExPattern2.Replace(newName, replace);
                    string filesDir = System.IO.Path.GetDirectoryName(invalidFiles);
                    string fileExt = System.IO.Path.GetExtension(invalidFiles);
                    string fileWithExt = newName2 + fileExt;
                    string newPath = System.IO.Path.Combine(filesDir, fileWithExt);
                    System.IO.File.Move(invalidFiles, newPath);


                    DataGridViewRow clean = new DataGridViewRow();
                    clean.CreateCells(dataGridView1);
                    clean.Cells[0].Value = doublepPath;
                    clean.Cells[1].Value = filewithDoublePName;
                    clean.Cells[2].Value = fileWithExt;
                    dataGridView1.Rows.Add(clean);
                }

                else
                {
                    if (filesCount.ContainsKey(fileOnly))
                    {
                        filesCount[fileOnly]++;
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        filesCount.Add(fileOnly, 1);
                        string newFileName = String.Format("{0}{1}{2}",
                            System.IO.Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(fileOnly),
                            filesCount[fileOnly].ToString(),
                            System.IO.Path.GetExtension(fileOnly));

                        string newFilePath = System.IO.Path.Combine(System.IO.Path.GetDirectoryName(fileOnly), newFileName);
                        System.IO.File.Move(fileOnly, newFilePath);

                        DataGridViewRow clean = new DataGridViewRow();
                        clean.CreateCells(dataGridView1);
                        clean.Cells[0].Value = pathOnly;
                        clean.Cells[1].Value = fileOnly;
                        clean.Cells[2].Value = newFileName;
                        dataGridView1.Rows.Add(clean);
                    }

                }
            }
        }
         catch(Exception e)
         {
         //throw;
             StreamWriter doublepcleanup = new StreamWriter(@"G:\DoublePeriodCleanup_Errors.txt");
             doublepcleanup.Write("Double Period Error: " + e + "\r\n");
             doublepcleanup.Close();
         }

        }
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10 Answers 10

up vote 7 down vote accepted
string name = "Text...1.txt";   
Regex r = new Regex("[.][.]+");
string result = r.Replace(name, " ");
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Well, to do that with a string:

string st = "asdf..asdf...asfd...asdf.asf.asdf.s.s";
Regex r = new Regex("\\.\\.+");
st = r.Replace(st, " ");

This will replace any instance of 2 or more '.'s with a space.

I would throw this into a method:

public static string StringReplace(string original, 
                                   string regexMatch, string replacement) {
    Regex r = new Regex(regexMatch);
    return r.Replace(original, replacement);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Only problem with this is the file "Test......jpg" –  Struan Aug 2 '10 at 18:24
1  
@Struan, true. This does fail in that case. May just want to add a special case for it. –  jjnguy Aug 2 '10 at 18:27

How about this?

string newFileName = String.Join(".", fileName.Split('.').Select(p => !String.IsNullOrEmpty(p) ? p : " ").ToArray())
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Why not use something like this?

string newName = name;
while (newName.IndexOf("..") != -1)
  newName = newName.Replace("..", "  ");
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2  
This will add a lot of spaces. For example "Test......1.txt" will have 3 spaces in it. –  Victor Hurdugaci Aug 2 '10 at 17:54
static string CleanUpPeriods(string filename)
{
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    if (filename.Length > 0) sb.Append(filename[0]);
    for (int i = 1; i < filename.Length; i++)
    {
        char last = filename[i - 1];
        char current = filename[i];
        if (current != '.' || last != '.') sb.Append(current);
    }
    return sb.ToString();
}
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You could use use regular expressions, something like this

string fileName = new Regex(@"[.][.]+").Replace(oldFileName, "");
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your regix can be as simple as "[.][.]+", and you should be replacing with a space instead of the empty string. –  jjnguy Aug 2 '10 at 18:01

Continuing from dark_charlie's solution, isn't

string newName = name;
while (newName.IndexOf("..") != -1)
  newName = newName.Replace("..", ".");

enough?

share|improve this answer

I have tested this code on a number of cases, and it appears to exhibit the requested behavior.

    private static string RemoveExcessPeriods(string text)
    {
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(text))
            return string.Empty;
        // If there are no consecutive periods, then just get out of here.
        if (!text.Contains(".."))
            return text;
        // To keep things simple, let's separate the file name from its extension.
        string extension = Path.GetExtension(text);
        string fileName = Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(text);
        StringBuilder result = new StringBuilder(text.Length);
        bool lastCharacterWasPeriod = false;
        bool thisCharacterIsPeriod = fileName.Length > 0 && fileName[0] == '.';
        bool nextCharacterIsPeriod;
        for (int index = 0; index < fileName.Length; index++)
        {
            // Includes both the extension separator and other periods.
            nextCharacterIsPeriod = fileName.Length == index + 1 || fileName[index + 1] == '.';

            if (!thisCharacterIsPeriod)
                result.Append(fileName[index]);
            else if (thisCharacterIsPeriod && !lastCharacterWasPeriod && !nextCharacterIsPeriod)
                result.Append('.');
            else if (thisCharacterIsPeriod && !lastCharacterWasPeriod)
                result.Append(' ');

            lastCharacterWasPeriod = thisCharacterIsPeriod;
            thisCharacterIsPeriod = nextCharacterIsPeriod;
        }
        return result.ToString() + extension;
    }

I just made a change to handle some edge cases. Here are some test results for this version.

"Test....1.txt" => "Test 1.txt"
"1.0.1..Test.txt" => "1.0.1 Test.txt"
"Test......jpg" => "Test .jpg"
"Test.....jpg" => "Test .jpg"
"one.pic.jpg" => "one.pic.jpg"
"one..pic.jpg" => "one pic.jpg"
"one..two..three.pic.jpg" => "one two three.pic.jpg"
"one...two..three.pic.jpg" => "one two three.pic.jpg"
"one..two..three.pic..jpg" => "one two three.pic .jpg"
"one..two..three..pic.jpg" => "one two three pic.jpg"
"one..two..three...pic...jpg" => "one two three pic .jpg"
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Combining some other answers...

static string CleanUpPeriods(string filename)
{
    string extension = Path.GetExtension(filename);
    string name = Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(filename);
    Regex regex = new Regex(@"\.\.+");
    string s = regex.Replace(name, " ").Trim();
    if (s.EndsWith(".")) s = s.Substring(0, s.Length - 1);
    return s + extension;
}

Sample Output

"Test........jpg" -> "Test.jpg"
"Test....1.jpg" -> "Test 1.jpg"
"Test 1.0.1.jpg" -> "Test 1.0.1.jpg"
"Test..jpg" -> "Test.jpg"
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void ReplaceConsecutive(string src, int lenght, string replace)
{
    char last;
    int count = 0;
    StringBuilder ret = new StringBuilder();
    StringBuilder add = new StringBuilder();
    foreach (char now in src)
    {
        if (now == last)
        {
            add.Append(now);
            if (count > lenght)
            {
                ret.Append(replace);
                    add = new StringBuilder();
            }
            count++;
        }
        else
        {
            ret.Append(add);
            add = new StringBuilder();
            count = 0;
            ret.Append(now);
        }
    }
    return ret.ToString();
}

Untested, but this should work.

src is the string you want to check for consecutives, lenght is the number of equal chars followed by each other until they get replaced with replace. This is AFAIK also possible in Regex, but I'm not that good with Regex's that I could do this.

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