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try {
}
catch (Exception) {
}

can i just write

try {
}
catch {
}

Is this ok in C# .NET 3.5. Code looks nicer but I don't know if is the same.

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+1: very interesting question. Made me learn something new. –  sergiom Aug 2 '10 at 21:20

7 Answers 7

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Yes, the advantage of the first form is that you can name the exception variable and then use the object to log the exception details to file, etc...

try {
}
catch (Exception ex) {
  // Log exception message here...
}

Also, it is generally a bad practice to catch the generic Exception class if you can instead catch specific exceptions (such as an IOException) using the first form.

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1  
@Justin Ethier, senzacionale: The reason being, can your code really handle something like an out of memory error, or worse? If you catch an exception, you are saying you can handle the case that exception type describes. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Aug 2 '10 at 21:13
    
Absolutely. And it really depends on the exception. If you get an out of memory exception you are probably screwed at that point. On the other hand, I would expect your code could "sign-up" to gracefully handle a FileNotFoundException... –  Justin Ethier Aug 2 '10 at 21:15
    
@Merlyn Morgan-Graham: Sometimes you catch the exception just to provide a nice user message and/or log it. @Justin Ethier: What you can do is add as many catch(Specific Ex) as you can or want to handle... but if you are unsure if something else could be wrong the last catch should be the "Exception" type. –  Romias Aug 2 '10 at 21:18
4  
This is incorrect - the first will catch all CLS compliant exceptions, the second will also catch non CLS compliant exceptions. –  Oded Aug 2 '10 at 21:20
1  
His first form is parameter-less. Your example has a parameter, so I'm not sure how your example lines up. The first form allows you to parameter-lessly catch exceptions by type, where the second allows all exceptions to be caught parameter-lessly. –  Travis Heseman Aug 2 '10 at 22:07

They are not the same.

catch (Exception) { } will catch managed exceptions only; catch { } will catch non-CLS exceptions as well: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-gb/bb264489.aspx

An unhandled non-CLS compliant exception becomes a security issue when previously allowed permissions are removed in the catch block. Because non-CLS compliant exceptions are not caught, a malicious method that throws a non-CLS compliant exception could run with elevated permissions.

Edit: Turns out .NET 2.0+ wraps the values -- so they are the same. That's a bit of a relief!

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4  
+1... didn't know that –  iandisme Aug 2 '10 at 21:17
2  
+1 - only correct answer here. –  Oded Aug 2 '10 at 21:17
    
+1: very informative answer. I didn't khow that non-CLS exceptions could be intercepted this way. –  sergiom Aug 2 '10 at 21:18
    
@Rei Miyasaka: O_O! This is shocking news to me. Thanks for the tip. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Aug 2 '10 at 21:39
2  
This only applies before C# 2.0 –  Travis Heseman Aug 2 '10 at 21:48

Edit: As of C# 2.0, non-CLS-compliant exceptions can be caught in both ways.

So, yes. They are identical. A parameter-less catch clause without a Type declaration catches all Exceptions.

In the CLR 2.0, MS introduced RuntimeWrappedException, which is a CLS-compliant exception type, to encapsulate non-CLS-compliant exceptions. The C# compiler still doesn't allow you to throw them, but it can catch them with the catch (Exception) { } syntax.

This is why the C# compiler will issue warning CS1058 if you use both clauses at the same time on CLR 2.0 or later.

Thus, they are in fact identical.

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thx for so fast answer. –  senzacionale Aug 2 '10 at 21:08
    
I thought the first would only catch managed exceptions and the second would also catch win32 exceptions. –  Oded Aug 2 '10 at 21:09
    
@Oded: I may be wrong, but I think win32 exceptions derive from Exception, in which case they would be caught. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Aug 2 '10 at 21:11
    
@Merlyn Morgan-Graham - I was wrong. The difference is that the second will also catch exceptions that are not CLS compliant. –  Oded Aug 2 '10 at 21:18

Its the same, but if you put an e after Exception in your first example then you know what exception was thrown...

edit: you should never catch exception, how do you know how to handle it properly?

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I guess unless you want to use the Exception in some sort the second one is perfectly fine. though in order to use the exception in first one you need to declare a variable like this

try {
}
catch (Exception e) {
//do something with e
}
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Both of your examples appear like you're not doing anything with the exception data. This is generally not a good practice. But both are exactly the same since all exceptions classes are derived from System.Exception.

You should consider doing some type of logging then possibly rethrow the original exception or wrap it in a more specialized exception that your application can understand.

try
{
    // Some code here
}
catch(Exception ex)
{
    // Do some logging
    throw;
}

OR

try
{
    // Some code here
}
catch(Exception ex)
{
    // Do some logging
    // wrap your exception in some custom exception
    throw new CustomException("Some custom error message, ex); 
}

You should typically only catch exceptions that your code could handle, otherwise it should bubble up and it should eventually be caught by a global exception handler assuming you have one.

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i know but i did not know if this two satement are the same. Thx anyway. –  senzacionale Aug 2 '10 at 21:16

They are different as noted:

An unhandled non-CLS compliant exception becomes a security issue when previously allowed permissions are removed in the catch block. Because non-CLS compliant exceptions are not caught, a malicious method that throws a non-CLS compliant exception could run with elevated permissions.

You can see the difference in the IL generated:

//no (Exception)
.try L_0001 to L_0005 catch object handler L_0005 to L_000a

//with (Exception)
.try L_0001 to L_0005 catch [mscorlib]System.Exception handler L_0005 to L_000a
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