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Sorry for the bad title, but I couldn't think of a better one.

I'm having a class A and a class B which is kind of a sub class of A, like so:

(Is there actually a correct name for it? Isn't "sub class" reserved for inheritance?)

class A {
    int i = 0;
    class B {
        int j = 1;
    }
}

class Test {
    public static void main() {
        A a = new A();
        B b = a.new B();
        A c = ??? b ??? // get "a" back
    }
}

From B every property of A can be accessed, therefore both, a.i and b.i, return 0. Now, I'm wondering whether it's somehow possible to retrieve the original object of type A out of b, as b contains everything that a contains? Simple casting apparently doesn't do the trick.

Second one:

class A {

    void print() {
        System.out.println("This is class A.");
    }

    class B {
        void print() {
            // <--- How to access print() of class A (like this.A.print() or smth)? 
            System.out.println("This is class B.");
        }
    }
}

You could alternatively also provide me with some good resources on this topic, as I've been too stupid to find a good one so far.

Thanks in advance. :)

share|improve this question
    
The correct name is inner class, I believe. –  tvanfosson Dec 4 '08 at 0:35
    
I believe that this is a duplicate of this question (stackoverflow.com/questions/309737/…) –  Dan Dyer Dec 4 '08 at 0:38
    
Thanks Dan, this helped me a lot! :) –  balu Dec 4 '08 at 0:49
1  
actually i always forget about this "classname.this" syntax all the way again :) –  Johannes Schaub - litb Dec 4 '08 at 1:09
    
Does A c = b.this$0; work? <-- Don't do it!! –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Dec 4 '08 at 14:20

4 Answers 4

up vote 20 down vote accepted

There doesn't seem to be a way to access the outer class from outside. But you can do it like this:

class A {
    int i = 0;
    class B {
        final A outer = A.this;
        int j = 1;
    }
}

class Test {
    public static void main() {
        A a = new A();
        A.B b = a.new B();
        A c = b.outer // get "a" back
    }
}

ClassName.this will be the instance of the outerclass associated with the instance of an inner class.

share|improve this answer
    
I think B b = ... is wrong. You cannot declare a ref of type B without using A. A.B b = ... Would be better.. –  OscarRyz Dec 4 '08 at 1:00
    
yes i thought so too –  Johannes Schaub - litb Dec 4 '08 at 1:03
    
I'd make the declaration final A outer = A.this; to be on the safe side –  Bill Michell Dec 4 '08 at 10:23
    
Bill, thanks corrected –  Johannes Schaub - litb Dec 4 '08 at 14:33
    
A more elegant solution is to provide a method like outer() to return A.this to save adding a field. –  Peter Lawrey May 3 '09 at 10:01

You can access it with the ParentClass.this syntax from within the inner class.

e.g.

public class Outter
{
    class Inner {
        public Outter getOutter()
        {
            return Outter.this;
        }
    }

    public Inner getInner(){
        return new Inner();
    }
}

class Runner{
    public static void main(String[] args){
        Outter out = new Outter(); 
        Outter.Inner inner = out.getInner();

        System.out.println(inner.getOutter().toString());
    }
}
share|improve this answer

[Edit: My answer is appropriate for C# programmers, but I can't guarantee that its applicable to Java.]

B is an inner class, not a subclass of A. Additionally, B does not hold an instance of A, so your code as is cannot return any instance of A.

You need to restructure your classes as follows:

class A
{
    public class B
    {
       public A Parent;
       public B(A parent)
       {
          this.Parent = parent;
       }
    }
}

Now your B class has a field 'Parent' which returns its parent. You can use these classes as follows (this is C# syntax, because I don't know if Java has a different syntax for instantiating inner classes):

public static void Main(String[] args)
{
    A parent = new A();
    A.B child = new A.B(child);
    A backToParent = child.Parent;
}

Of course, creating your B class in this way seems little funny: technically, you can pass in any parent. It would probably be better to rewrite your A class with a method which returns a B:

class A
{        
    public class B
    {
       public A Parent;
       public B(A parent)
       {
          this.Parent = parent;
       }
    }

    public B getChild()
    {
        return new B(this);
    }
}

public static void Main(String[] args)
{
    A parent = new A();
    A.B child = A.getChild();
    A backToParent = child.Parent;
}
share|improve this answer
    
In fact, it does hold an instance of A. See also: stackoverflow.com/questions/309737/… However, thanks for your answer. The way you described is certainly another solution. –  balu Dec 4 '08 at 0:54
1  
It seems "inner class" referes to a different concept than in Java (approximately what Java would call "nested class"). –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Dec 4 '08 at 14:18

this seemed to work for me

class A {
    int i = 0;
    class B {
        int j = 1;
    }
}

class Test {
    public static void main() {
        A a = new A();
        A.B b = a.new B();
        A c = (A)b.getClass().getDeclaredField("this$0").get(b);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

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