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I just added a feature to a forum and while most users see and use it, a small number of people report strange behavior. I thought the problem might be due to browser caching and a ctrl+F5 solved it for some, but some can't fix it. (It's a simple editor button.)

I feel stupid even asking this but is there any way JS could not work on some machines the way it should?

EDIT: code added:

    insertTab: function()
{
    if( this.get_selection() == "" )
    {
            var val = prompt( "How many lines of tablature?", '');
            if( val == '' ) return true;

            val = parseInt(val);

            var txt = "[code]\n";

            while ( val > 0 )
            {
                txt += "------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------" + "\n";
                txt += "------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------" + "\n";
                txt += "------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------" + "\n";
                txt += "------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------" + "\n";
                txt += "------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------" + "\n";
                txt += "------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------" + "\n";
                txt += "\n";

                val--;
            }

            this.insert_text( txt + "[/code]" );
    }
    else
    {
        this.wrap_tags_lite( '[code]', '[/code]', 0);
    }
}

It works perfectly on every computer I've tried personally.

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Please add the offending code. –  ChaosPandion Aug 2 '10 at 23:32
2  
Most JavaScript (properly written) does behave the same, and it's more of a browser difference than a machine difference (OS I mean), you should post the code and which browsers are having issues. –  Nick Craver Aug 2 '10 at 23:34
    
Please clarify "but some can't fix it." Does this mean, that some don't see the button? –  Jordan S. Jones Aug 2 '10 at 23:34
    
If Ctrl+F5 fixes it for "some" but not "all" users, are you 100% sure those who say they're doing a "force refresh" are actually doing it? I've have plenty of users swear left-and-right that they're doing what I tell them to do only to find out that they're actually not doing it at all... In that case, you can try adding a dummy query string to your css file - this'll force all browsers to reload it (regardless of caching policy, since it "looks like" a whole new URL) like: href="my.css?v=1234". –  Dean Harding Aug 2 '10 at 23:42
    
They see the button, but they don't get the desired result when they click it. It changes the fonts settings instead. –  mathon12 Aug 2 '10 at 23:44
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2 Answers

Unfortunately its not really the machines that is causing the problem, most likely it is the browsers. Javascript runtime engines are implemented a little bit differently in all of the browsers so you can get slightly different behavior out of each.

IE, WebKit, and Mozilla all behave a little bit differently. When you are testing your code, you need to test on all browsers. Another option is to use a library like JQuery which somewhat abstracts some of the nuances out of javascript cross-browser programming.

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2  
This is the best general answer but if they post the code we may be able to drill down to a specific solution. –  ChaosPandion Aug 2 '10 at 23:39
    
This makes browser scripting sound like black magic, which it really isn't. –  Tim Down Aug 2 '10 at 23:52
    
Hmm, that's what I thought first. But it really wouldn't surprise me if some of the users just forgot to turn on JS on their browsers. >.< Added the offending code. –  mathon12 Aug 2 '10 at 23:53
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This answer is specifically for addressing the cache issue, I can't say much on the "other" behavior without seeing the code.

When you change your script, either in an automated build process (if at all possible) or manually, you can update your script references, for example look at this page (I removed type="" for brevity)

<script src="http://sstatic.net/js/master.js?v=ad53a2ffc630"></script> 

It used to be a number, the changeset of the checkin or something, I'm not sure of the source, and it doesn't matter really, as long as it updated when the build changes. I assume it's some sort of hash now, which is even smarter, users won't re-download it on a version change if that file didn't change.

The important part is that it does change when the file does, and because of the querystring the browser will re-download the file, eliminating the need for Ctrl+F5.

share|improve this answer
    
Okay, so a difference in parameter values should force a re-download. However the format I'm dealing with is like src=".../ipb.js?load=lang,editor" so I can't directly reference ipb.editor.js, it seems. Thanks. –  mathon12 Aug 3 '10 at 0:08
    
@mathon12 - You can add another parameter, or should be able to, it depends what that loader does, but &v=something on the end should work. –  Nick Craver Aug 3 '10 at 0:10
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