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I am trying to convert a DataTable to an IEnumerable. Where T is a custom type I created. I know I can do it by creating a List but I was think there was a slicker way to do it using IEnumerable. Here is what I have now.

    private IEnumerable<TankReading> ConvertToTankReadings(DataTable dataTable)
    {
        var tankReadings = new List<TankReading>();
        foreach (DataRow row in dataTable.Rows)
        {
            var tankReading = new TankReading
                                  {
                                      TankReadingsID = Convert.ToInt32(row["TRReadingsID"]),
                                      TankID = Convert.ToInt32(row["TankID"]),
                                      ReadingDateTime = Convert.ToDateTime(row["ReadingDateTime"]),
                                      ReadingFeet = Convert.ToInt32(row["ReadingFeet"]),
                                      ReadingInches = Convert.ToInt32(row["ReadingInches"]),
                                      MaterialNumber = row["MaterialNumber"].ToString(),
                                      EnteredBy = row["EnteredBy"].ToString(),
                                      ReadingPounds = Convert.ToDecimal(row["ReadingPounds"]),
                                      MaterialID = Convert.ToInt32(row["MaterialID"]),
                                      Submitted = Convert.ToBoolean(row["Submitted"]),
                                  };
            tankReadings.Add(tankReading);
        }
        return tankReadings.AsEnumerable();
    }

The key part being I am creating a List then returning it using AsEnumerable().

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3 Answers 3

up vote 27 down vote accepted

Nothing wrong with that implementation. You might give the yield keyword a shot, see how you like it:

private IEnumerable<TankReading> ConvertToTankReadings(DataTable dataTable)
    {
        foreach (DataRow row in dataTable.Rows)
        {
            yield return new TankReading
                                  {
                                      TankReadingsID = Convert.ToInt32(row["TRReadingsID"]),
                                      TankID = Convert.ToInt32(row["TankID"]),
                                      ReadingDateTime = Convert.ToDateTime(row["ReadingDateTime"]),
                                      ReadingFeet = Convert.ToInt32(row["ReadingFeet"]),
                                      ReadingInches = Convert.ToInt32(row["ReadingInches"]),
                                      MaterialNumber = row["MaterialNumber"].ToString(),
                                      EnteredBy = row["EnteredBy"].ToString(),
                                      ReadingPounds = Convert.ToDecimal(row["ReadingPounds"]),
                                      MaterialID = Convert.ToInt32(row["MaterialID"]),
                                      Submitted = Convert.ToBoolean(row["Submitted"]),
                                  };
        }

    }

Also the AsEnumerable isn't necessary, as List<T> is already an IEnumerable<T>

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Matt Greer thanks for your answer. This looks good. I think I'll give it a try and see what happens. –  mpenrow Aug 3 '10 at 13:26

There's also a DataSetExtension method called "AsEnumerable()" (in System.Data) that takes a DataTable and returns an Enumerable. See the MSDN doc for more details, but it's basically as easy as:

dataTable.AsEnumerable()

The downside is that it's enumerating DataRow, not your custom class. A "Select()" LINQ call could convert the row data, however:

private IEnumerable<TankReading> ConvertToTankReadings(DataTable dataTable)
{
    return dataTable.AsEnumerable().Select(row =>
        {
            return new TankReading      
            {      
                TankReadingsID = Convert.ToInt32(row["TRReadingsID"]),      
                TankID = Convert.ToInt32(row["TankID"]),      
                ReadingDateTime = Convert.ToDateTime(row["ReadingDateTime"]),      
                ReadingFeet = Convert.ToInt32(row["ReadingFeet"]),      
                ReadingInches = Convert.ToInt32(row["ReadingInches"]),      
                MaterialNumber = row["MaterialNumber"].ToString(),      
                EnteredBy = row["EnteredBy"].ToString(),      
                ReadingPounds = Convert.ToDecimal(row["ReadingPounds"]),      
                MaterialID = Convert.ToInt32(row["MaterialID"]),      
                Submitted = Convert.ToBoolean(row["Submitted"]),      
            });
        }
}
share|improve this answer
    
JaredReisinger thanks for your help. The dataTable.AsEnumerable is very interesting. I'll have to investigate that one. –  mpenrow Aug 3 '10 at 13:25
    
Oooh, nice. I hadn't noticed dataTable.AsEnumerable(), and was always doing the longer, uglier: dataTable.Rows.Cast<DataSetName.SomeLongDataTableRowName>() –  Adam Nofsinger May 13 '11 at 16:33
3  
The AsEnumerable extension method is found in the System.Data namespace but be sure to reference the System.Data.DataSetExtensions assembly to use it. –  jhappoldt Jan 3 '13 at 20:38
        PagedDataSource objPage = new PagedDataSource();

        DataView dataView = listData.DefaultView;
        objPage.AllowPaging = true;
        objPage.DataSource = dataView;
        objPage.PageSize = PageSize;

        TotalPages = objPage.PageCount;

        objPage.CurrentPageIndex = CurrentPage - 1;

        //Convert PagedDataSource to DataTable
        System.Collections.IEnumerator pagedData = objPage.GetEnumerator();

        DataTable filteredData = new DataTable();
        bool flagToCopyDTStruct = false;
        while (pagedData.MoveNext())
        {
            DataRowView rowView = (DataRowView)pagedData.Current;
            if (!flagToCopyDTStruct)
            {
                filteredData = rowView.Row.Table.Clone();
                flagToCopyDTStruct = true;
            }
            filteredData.LoadDataRow(rowView.Row.ItemArray, true);
        }

        //Here is your filtered DataTable
        return filterData; 
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3  
Can you explain what this code even do? Is this code copied? –  quantum Oct 21 '12 at 13:19
    
Can you explain what your code actually does ? –  David Moorhouse Jan 13 '14 at 20:22

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