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Given a NxN matrix with 0s and 1s. Set every row that contains a 0 to all 0s and set every column that contains a 0 to all 0s.

For example

1 0 1 1 0
0 1 1 1 0
1 1 1 1 1
1 0 1 1 1
1 1 1 1 1

results in

0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0
0 0 1 1 0
0 0 0 0 0
0 0 1 1 0

A Microsoft Engineer told me that there is a solution that involves no extra memory, just two boolean variables and one pass, so I'm looking for that answer.

BTW, imagine it is a bit matrix, therefore just 1s and 0s are allow to be in the matrix.

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1  
Huh? What is "whenever you encounter"? In what order are you encountering the elements in the matrix? And if you encounter all the bits, won't you get all 0s anyway? –  ShreevatsaR Dec 4 '08 at 0:51
    
Well, the order in which you decide to encounter the elements is your decision, the thing is that you must only set to 0s the proper elements. If you encounter all the bits set to 0, yes the matrix will still be filled with zeros. –  jaircazarin-old-account Dec 4 '08 at 0:55
4  
+1 for being an interesting question. :) –  Doctor Jones Dec 4 '08 at 1:39
    
What are "the proper elements"? Are you given two matrices, one the "source" matrix and one a "target" matrix and you must decide in which order to "encounter" the elements so as to get the "target" matrix? –  ShreevatsaR Dec 4 '08 at 1:46
1  
I think you misheard something for the '1 pass' think. It can be done linearly in 2 passes though, without extra memory, just 2 booleans ;-) So I strongly assume that it is the solution he meant (see below) –  Piotr Lesnicki Dec 4 '08 at 2:47
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30 Answers

up vote 82 down vote accepted

Ok, so I'm tired as it's 3AM here, but I have a first try inplace with exactly 2 passes on each number in the matrix, so in O(NxN) and it is linear in the size of the matrix.

I use 1rst column and first row as markers to know where are rows/cols with only 1's. Then, there are 2 variables l and c to remember if 1rst row/column are all 1's also. So the first pass sets the markers and resets the rest to 0's.

The second pass sets 1 in places where rows and cols where marked to be 1, and resets 1st line/col depending on l and c.

I doubt strongly that I can be done in 1 pass as squares in the beginning depend on squares in the end. Maybe my 2nd pass can be made more efficient...

import pprint

m = [[1, 0, 1, 1, 0],
     [0, 1, 1, 1, 0],
     [1, 1, 1, 1, 1],
     [1, 0, 1, 1, 1],
     [1, 1, 1, 1, 1]]



N = len(m)

### pass 1

# 1 rst line/column
c = 1
for i in range(N):
    c &= m[i][0]

l = 1
for i in range(1,N):
    l &= m[0][i]


# other line/cols
# use line1, col1 to keep only those with 1
for i in range(1,N):
    for j in range(1,N):
        if m[i][j] == 0:
            m[0][j] = 0
            m[i][0] = 0
        else:
            m[i][j] = 0

### pass 2

# if line1 and col1 are ones: it is 1
for i in range(1,N):
    for j in range(1,N):
        if m[i][0] & m[0][j]:
            m[i][j] = 1

# 1rst row and col: reset if 0
if l == 0:
    for i in range(N):
        m [i][0] = 0

if c == 0:
    for j in range(1,N):
        m [0][j] = 0


pprint.pprint(m)
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2  
+1 for correct answer (IMO), shame I can't give you another +1 for working out the correct question :-) –  Steve Jessop Dec 4 '08 at 22:28
    
One problem here is if n > sizeof( c ) then it breaks down. To expand this to work in the general case of n, you would need to dynamically size your bit field which I think would violate the constraint given by the problem. –  Adam Dec 8 '08 at 20:08
    
No, c isn't a bitfield, it's just a bool. The &= isn't a bitwise op (well, it is, but on a 1-bit value), it's there because c tells you whether the first column is all 1 (true) or contains a 0 (false). –  Steve Jessop Dec 9 '08 at 18:54
2  
It fails if the top row is [0,1,1,1...] My bug fix is to initialize l to m[0][0] rather than 1 –  paperhorse Dec 11 '08 at 21:53
1  
BTW, I believe that the condition in the second pass should be something like: if m[i][0] | m[0][j]: –  jaircazarin-old-account Dec 24 '08 at 6:11
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This cannot be done in one pass since a single bit has an effect on bits before and after it in any ordering. IOW Whatever order you traverse the array in, you may later come accross a 0 which means you have to go back and change a previous 1 to a 0.

Update

People seem to think that by restricting N to some fixed value (say 8) you can solve this is one pass. Well that's a) missing the point and b) not the original question. I wouldn't post a question on sorting and expect an answer which started "assuming you only want to sort 8 things...".

That said, it's a reasonable approach if you know that N is in fact restricted to 8. My answer above answers the original question which has no such retriction.

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It cannot be done in one pass without additional memory. It can be done in one pass if there there is another NxN matrix to store results in. Likewise, with some bit twiddles and two passes it can be done without additional memory. –  paxos1977 Dec 4 '08 at 23:51
1  
You still cannot do it in one pass even if you use a temporary matrix, or else there is something weird I'm not getting here. You need one pass to deduce the row/column information, and one to set everything. –  Lasse V. Karlsen Dec 8 '08 at 10:12
    
I solved this problem by recognizing that there is only one unique non-zero value possible per row, and just assigning it by reference. –  Daniel Papasian Dec 8 '08 at 17:01
    
@ceretullis, lassevk: I still think it can't be done in one pass. Passes over that second matrix would have to count - otherwise you could just copy the matrix in one pass, and work with the copy however you wanted. @Daniel Papasian: Your solution doesn't scale where N > #bits in int/long/whatever –  Draemon Dec 8 '08 at 18:43
    
Draemon, the technique scales fine, it's just math - you can either build hardware that does it, or you can use software techniques to manipulate numbers larger than your word size. Neither violates the constraints of the problem, IMHO –  Daniel Papasian Dec 8 '08 at 19:45
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So my idea is to use the values in the last row/column as a flag to indicate whether all of the values in the corresponding column/row are 1s.

Using a Zig Zag scan through the entire matrix EXCEPT the final row/column. At each element, you set the value in the final row/column as to the logical AND of itself with the value in the current element. In other words, if you hit a 0, the final row/column will be set to 0. If you it a 1, the value in the final row/column will be 1 only if it was 1 already. In any case set the current element to 0.

When you've finished, your final row/column should have 1s iff the corresponding column/row was filled with 1s.

Do a linear scan through the final row and column and looking for 1s. Set 1s in the corresponding elements in body of the matrix where the final row and column are both 1s.

Coding it will be tricky to avoid off-by-one errors etc but it should work in one pass.

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Very nice... I was thinking on the same lines, but missed using the final row/column to store that information, so I was stuck with extra memory for a pair of Nx1 arrays. –  Dave Sherohman Dec 8 '08 at 15:44
1  
That looks like two passes to me - one pass is the zig-zag scan, the second is the "Set 1s in the corresponding elements in body of the matrix where the final row and column are both 1s". –  Adam Rosenfield Dec 9 '08 at 21:38
    
The zig-zag scan (which as someone pointed out to me isn't strictly necessary) traverses all BUT the final row/column. So scanning the final/row column does not duplicate elements previously scanned. Hence one pass. In other words it's O(N^2) for an N*N matrix. –  Alastair Dec 10 '08 at 20:37
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I don't think it's doable. When you're on the first square and its value is 1, you have no way of knowing what the values of the other squares in the same row and column are. So you have to check those and if there's a zero, return to the first square and change its value to zero. I'll recommend doing it in two passes - the first pass gathers information about which rows and columns must be zeroed out (the information is stored in an array, so we're using some extra memory). The second pass changes the values. I know that's not the solution you're looking for, but I think it's a practical one. The constraints given by you render the problem unsolvable.

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I have nearly the same solution (see below) without additional arrays. and it is linear time (but 2 passes though) –  Piotr Lesnicki Dec 4 '08 at 2:43
    
@Piotr: Yes, the second pass seems unavoidable. The introduction of arrays to store the rows and columns information that I've proposed makes the algorithm more straight-forward and a little bit faster as there's less checking and value-changing. It's a trade-off between storage and efficiency. –  Boyan Dec 4 '08 at 2:54
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I've got a solution here, it runs in a single pass, and does all processing "in place" with no extra memory (save for growing the stack).

It uses recursion to delay the writing of zeros which of course would destroy the matrix for the other rows and cols:

#include <iostream>

/**
* The idea with my algorithm is to delay the writing of zeros
* till all rows and cols can be processed. I do this using
* recursion:
* 1) Enter Recursive Function:
* 2) Check the row and col of this "corner" for zeros and store the results in bools
* 3) Send recursive function to the next corner
* 4) When the recursive function returns, use the data we stored in step 2
*       to zero the the row and col conditionally
*
* The corners I talk about are just how I ensure I hit all the row's a cols,
* I progress through the matrix from (0,0) to (1,1) to (2,2) and on to (n,n).
*
* For simplicities sake, I use ints instead of individual bits. But I never store
* anything but 0 or 1 so it's still fair ;)
*/

// ================================
// Using globals just to keep function
// call syntax as straight forward as possible
int n = 5;
int m[5][5] = {
                { 1, 0, 1, 1, 0 },
                { 0, 1, 1, 1, 0 },
                { 1, 1, 1, 1, 1 },
                { 1, 0, 1, 1, 1 },
                { 1, 1, 1, 1, 1 }
            };
// ================================

// Just declaring the function prototypes
void processMatrix();
void processCorner( int cornerIndex );
bool checkRow( int rowIndex );
bool checkCol( int colIndex );
void zeroRow( int rowIndex );
void zeroCol( int colIndex );
void printMatrix();

// This function primes the pump
void processMatrix() {
    processCorner( 0 );
}

// Step 1) This is the heart of my recursive algorithm
void processCorner( int cornerIndex ) {
    // Step 2) Do the logic processing here and store the results
    bool rowZero = checkRow( cornerIndex );
    bool colZero = checkCol( cornerIndex );

    // Step 3) Now progress through the matrix
    int nextCorner = cornerIndex + 1;
    if( nextCorner < n )
        processCorner( nextCorner );

    // Step 4) Finially apply the changes determined earlier
    if( colZero )
        zeroCol( cornerIndex );
    if( rowZero )
        zeroRow( cornerIndex );
}

// This function returns whether or not the row contains a zero
bool checkRow( int rowIndex ) {
    bool zero = false;
    for( int i=0; i<n && !zero; ++i ) {
        if( m[ rowIndex ][ i ] == 0 )
            zero = true;
    }
    return zero;
}

// This is just a helper function for zeroing a row
void zeroRow( int rowIndex ) {
    for( int i=0; i<n; ++i ) {
        m[ rowIndex ][ i ] = 0;
    }
}

// This function returns whether or not the col contains a zero
bool checkCol( int colIndex ) {
    bool zero = false;
    for( int i=0; i<n && !zero; ++i ) {
        if( m[ i ][ colIndex ] == 0 )
            zero = true;
    }

    return zero;
}

// This is just a helper function for zeroing a col
void zeroCol( int colIndex ) {
    for( int i=0; i<n; ++i ) {
        m[ i ][ colIndex ] = 0;
    }
}

// Just a helper function for printing our matrix to std::out
void printMatrix() {
    std::cout << std::endl;
    for( int y=0; y<n; ++y ) {
        for( int x=0; x<n; ++x ) {
            std::cout << m[y][x] << " ";
        }
        std::cout << std::endl;
    }
    std::cout << std::endl;
}

// Execute!
int main() {
    printMatrix();
    processMatrix();
    printMatrix();
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Nice solution, but you are, technically, using more memory than the two allowed booleans (although on the stack). –  csl Dec 8 '08 at 18:32
1  
This is >1 pass. If you print (rowIndex, i) and (i, colIndex) as they are accessed in checkRow and checkCol you will see that each element is accessed multiple times. –  Draemon Dec 8 '08 at 18:49
    
Draemon: You are correct, I think we need a clear definition of "single pass" from the riddle maker. If he indeed means that each element can only be accessed once, then we need a different solution. –  Adam Dec 8 '08 at 19:07
    
I imagine the original problem (which has come to us via the telephone game) meant the problem should be solved "in place" meaning you don't have another copy of the matrix. And more optimal solutions don't even need temporary swap() like storage for processing. –  Adam Dec 8 '08 at 19:31
    
Also I sort of doubt the constraints are referring to the resulting machine code. Meaning, the "code" I provided only uses 2 bools. Depending on what optimizations my compiler does, the whole darn thing could be inlined or who knows what else. I think my solution is correct ;) –  Adam Dec 8 '08 at 19:36
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I can do it with two integer variables and two passes (up to 32 rows and columns...)

bool matrix[5][5] = 
{ 
	{1, 0, 1, 1, 0},
	{0, 1, 1, 1, 0},
	{1, 1, 1, 1, 1},
	{1, 0, 1, 1, 1},
	{1, 1, 1, 1, 1}
};

int CompleteRows = ~0;
int CompleteCols = ~0;

// Find the first 0
for (int row = 0; row < 5; ++row)
{
	for (int col = 0; col < 5; ++col)
	{
		CompleteRows &= ~(!matrix[row][col] << row);
		CompleteCols &= ~(!matrix[row][col] << col);
	}
}

for (int row = 0; row < 5; ++row)
	for (int col = 0; col < 5; ++col)
		matrix[row][col] = (CompleteRows & (1 << row)) && (CompleteCols & (1 << col));
share|improve this answer
    
Is this C#? What does the ~ mean? –  sker Dec 4 '08 at 3:21
    
It's C++. ~ inverts all the bits in a variable. 0x00000000 becomes 0x00000000. I basically start out with the all ones, and clear the bit for a row/column when I find a 0. CompleteCols has bits 2 and 3 set, and CompleteRows has bits 2 and 4 set (0 based). –  Eclipse Dec 4 '08 at 15:33
    
Then you just set the bits in the matrix corresponding to a one in both CompleteCols and CompleteRows. –  Eclipse Dec 4 '08 at 15:33
    
Sorry - 0x00000000 becomes 0xffffffff - too bad you can't edit comments.. –  Eclipse Dec 8 '08 at 15:41
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Keep a single variable to keep track of what all of the rows ANDed together are.

If a row is -1 (all 1s), then make the next row a reference to that variable

If a row is anything but, it's a 0. You can do everything in one pass. Psuedo-code:

foreach (my $row) rows {
     $andproduct = $andproduct & $row;
     if($row != -1) {
        zero out the row
     }  else {
        replace row with a reference to andproduct
     }
}

That should do it, in a single pass -- but there is an assumption here that N is small enough for the CPU to do arithmetic on a single row, else you're going to need to loop over each row to determine if it's all 1s or not, I believe. But given you're asking about algos and not constraining my hardware, I would just start my answer with "Build a CPU that supports N-bit arithmetic..."

Here's one example how it can be done in C. Note I argue that values and arr taken together represent the array, and p and numproduct are my iterator and AND product variables use to implement the problem. (I could have looped over arr with pointer arithmetic to validate my work, but once was enough!)

int main() {
    int values[] = { -10, 14, -1, -9, -1 }; /* From the problem spec, converted to decimal for my sanity */
    int *arr[5] = { values, values+1, values+2, values+3, values+4 };
    int **p;
    int numproduct = 127;

    for(p = arr; p < arr+5; ++p) {
        numproduct = numproduct & **p;
        if(**p != -1) {
            **p = 0;
        } else {
            *p = &numproduct;
        }
    }

    /* Print our array, this loop is just for show */
    int i;
    for(i = 0; i < 5; ++i) {
        printf("%x\n",*arr[i]);
    }
    return 0;
}

This produces 0, 0, 6, 0, 6, which is the result for the given inputs.

Or in PHP, if people think my stack games in C are cheating (I suggest to you that it's not, because I should be able to store the matrix whichever way I please):

<?php

$values = array(-10, 14, -1, -9, -1);
$numproduct = 127;

for($i = 0; $i < 5; ++$i) {
    $numproduct = $numproduct & $values[$i];
    if($values[$i] != -1) {
        $values[$i] = 0;
    } else {
        $values[$i] = &$numproduct;
    }
}

print_r($values);

Am I missing something?

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't work if N is bigger than the number of bits in an int/long/whatever so I don't think it counts. –  Draemon Dec 8 '08 at 18:44
    
It also won't catch things if the 0's are at the bottom of the array (try it with values[] = { -1, -9, -1, 14, -10 }). –  Eclipse Dec 8 '08 at 18:52
    
Draemon, I specify in my answer that without hardware constraints as part of the question, you start with "Build a CPU that supports N-bit arithmetic." –  Daniel Papasian Dec 8 '08 at 19:38
    
Josh, I don't follow. With either the C or PHP solution and the array you suggested, I get 6 0 6 0 0, which I believe is the correct answer. –  Daniel Papasian Dec 8 '08 at 19:42
    
@Daniel - You can't, because N isn't a constant. Besides "build a new computer with 1Mbit words is hardly a reasonable algorithmic step. –  Draemon Dec 9 '08 at 3:36
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Nice challange. This solution sort of uses just two booleans created on the stack, but the booleans are created several times on the stack since the function is recursive.

typedef unsigned short     WORD;
typedef unsigned char      BOOL;
#define true  1
#define false 0
BYTE buffer[5][5] = {
1, 0, 1, 1, 0,
0, 1, 1, 1, 0,
1, 1, 1, 1, 1,
1, 0, 1, 1, 1,
1, 1, 1, 1, 1
};
int scan_to_end(BOOL *h,BOOL *w,WORD N,WORD pos_N)
{
    WORD i;
    for(i=0;i<N;i++)
    {
    	if(!buffer[i][pos_N])
    		*h=false;
    	if(!buffer[pos_N][i])
    		*w=false;
    }
    return 0;
}
int set_line(BOOL h,BOOL w,WORD N,WORD pos_N)
{
    WORD i;
    if(!h)
    	for(i=0;i<N;i++)
    		buffer[i][pos_N] = false;
    if(!w)
    	for(i=0;i<N;i++)
    		buffer[pos_N][i] = false;
    return 0;
}
int scan(int N,int pos_N)
{
    BOOL h = true;
    BOOL w = true;
    if(pos_N == N)
    	return 0;
    // Do single scan
    scan_to_end(&h,&w,N,pos_N);
    // Scan all recursive before changeing data
    scan(N,pos_N+1);
    // Set the result of the scan
    set_line(h,w,N,pos_N);
    return 0;
}
int main(void)
{
    printf("Old matrix\n");
    printf( "%d,%d,%d,%d,%d \n", (WORD)buffer[0][0],(WORD)buffer[0][1],(WORD)buffer[0][2],(WORD)buffer[0][3],(WORD)buffer[0][4]);
    printf( "%d,%d,%d,%d,%d \n", (WORD)buffer[1][0],(WORD)buffer[1][1],(WORD)buffer[1][2],(WORD)buffer[1][3],(WORD)buffer[1][4]);
    printf( "%d,%d,%d,%d,%d \n", (WORD)buffer[2][0],(WORD)buffer[2][1],(WORD)buffer[2][2],(WORD)buffer[2][3],(WORD)buffer[2][4]);
    printf( "%d,%d,%d,%d,%d \n", (WORD)buffer[3][0],(WORD)buffer[3][1],(WORD)buffer[3][2],(WORD)buffer[3][3],(WORD)buffer[3][4]);
    printf( "%d,%d,%d,%d,%d \n", (WORD)buffer[4][0],(WORD)buffer[4][1],(WORD)buffer[4][2],(WORD)buffer[4][3],(WORD)buffer[4][4]);
    scan(5,0);
    printf("New matrix\n");
    printf( "%d,%d,%d,%d,%d \n", (WORD)buffer[0][0],(WORD)buffer[0][1],(WORD)buffer[0][2],(WORD)buffer[0][3],(WORD)buffer[0][4]);
    printf( "%d,%d,%d,%d,%d \n", (WORD)buffer[1][0],(WORD)buffer[1][1],(WORD)buffer[1][2],(WORD)buffer[1][3],(WORD)buffer[1][4]);
    printf( "%d,%d,%d,%d,%d \n", (WORD)buffer[2][0],(WORD)buffer[2][1],(WORD)buffer[2][2],(WORD)buffer[2][3],(WORD)buffer[2][4]);
    printf( "%d,%d,%d,%d,%d \n", (WORD)buffer[3][0],(WORD)buffer[3][1],(WORD)buffer[3][2],(WORD)buffer[3][3],(WORD)buffer[3][4]);
    printf( "%d,%d,%d,%d,%d \n", (WORD)buffer[4][0],(WORD)buffer[4][1],(WORD)buffer[4][2],(WORD)buffer[4][3],(WORD)buffer[4][4]);
    system( "pause" );
    return 0;
}

This scans in a pattern like:

s,s,s,s,s
s,0,0,0,0
s,0,0,0,0
s,0,0,0,0
s,0,0,0,0


0,s,0,0,0
s,s,s,s,s
0,s,0,0,0
0,s,0,0,0
0,s,0,0,0

and so on

And then changeing the values in this pattern on return on each of the scan functions. (Bottom up):

0,0,0,0,c
0,0,0,0,c
0,0,0,0,c
0,0,0,0,c
c,c,c,c,c


0,0,0,c,0
0,0,0,c,0
0,0,0,c,0
c,c,c,c,c
0,0,0,c,0

and so on

share|improve this answer
    
I would guess this isn't correct, since you still use up many more than two booleans on your stack. –  csl Dec 8 '08 at 15:01
    
As I sad sort of two booleans. This is the closest I can think of to the specs he provided. I would love to see an actual solution here. If it is fesable. –  eaanon01 Dec 8 '08 at 16:18
    
I don't think the requirements are referring to growing the stack. I think this is a perfectly valid solution. –  Adam Dec 8 '08 at 19:00
    
That is my thougt as well. But I cant be sure until somone else posts a better solution. At least my solution is compilable and can be verified by anyone. :) ... I am not to found of psudo code for practical problems. Thnx –  eaanon01 Dec 8 '08 at 22:19
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Okay this is a solution that

  • uses just one extra long value for working storage.
  • uses no recursion.
  • one pass of only N, not even N*N.
  • will work for other values of N but will need new #defines.
#include <stdio.h>
#define BIT30 (1<<24)
#define COLMASK 0x108421L
#define ROWMASK 0x1fL
unsigned long long STARTGRID = 
((0x10 | 0x0 | 0x4 | 0x2 | 0x0) << 20) |
((0x00 | 0x8 | 0x4 | 0x2 | 0x0) << 15) |
((0x10 | 0x8 | 0x4 | 0x2 | 0x1) << 10) |
((0x10 | 0x0 | 0x4 | 0x2 | 0x1) << 5) |
((0x10 | 0x8 | 0x4 | 0x2 | 0x1) << 0);


void dumpGrid (char* comment, unsigned long long theGrid) {
    char buffer[1000];
    buffer[0]='\0';
    printf ("\n\n%s\n",comment);
    for (int j=1;j<31; j++) {
    	if (j%5!=1)
    		printf( "%s%s", ((theGrid & BIT30)==BIT30)? "1" : "0",(((j%5)==0)?"\n" : ",") );	
    	theGrid = theGrid << 1;
    }
}

int main (int argc, const char * argv[]) {
    unsigned long long rowgrid = STARTGRID;
    unsigned long long colGrid = rowgrid;

    unsigned long long rowmask = ROWMASK;
    unsigned long long colmask = COLMASK;

    dumpGrid("Initial Grid", rowgrid);
    for (int i=0; i<5; i++) {
    	if ((rowgrid & rowmask)== rowmask) rowgrid |= rowmask;
    	else rowgrid &= ~rowmask;
    	if ((colGrid & colmask) == colmask) colmask |= colmask;
    	else colGrid &=  ~colmask;
    	rowmask <<= 5;
    	colmask <<= 1;
    }
    colGrid &= rowgrid;
    dumpGrid("RESULT Grid", colGrid);
    return 0;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
I just worked out how to do this in even less code.... –  AnthonyLambert Dec 10 '08 at 14:11
    
It is a nice solution to be sure. And I suppose every ones solution here neglects at least one of the requirements. So having a solution with a max allowed value for N isn't the worst thing in the world, so nice job on this one :) –  Adam Dec 15 '08 at 12:29
    
Restricting N to 8 and claiming this meets the one pass requirement is just plain dumb. This is not a general solution. No restriction of the size of N was stated in the question, so you have only solved a sub-problem. –  Draemon Dec 15 '08 at 14:47
    
but all these solutions have a limit on N in one way or another. –  AnthonyLambert Dec 15 '08 at 17:31
    
Saying that it is one pass of N is obviously completely wrong. Even just reading the value of each position in the original matrix is O(N^2) and it is most definitely necessary to read the value at each position at least once to be able to compute the solution. Even if you store values as single bits within a long long, accessing each bit is gonna be O(N^2) because there are O(N^2) bits. –  Alderath Aug 9 '12 at 14:37
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Actually. If you just want to run the algorithm and print out the results (i.e. not restore them, then this can easily be done in one pass. The trouble comes when you try to modify the array as you're running the algorithm.

Here is my solution It just involves ANDing the rows/columns values for a givein (i,j)'s element and printing it out.

#include <iostream>
#include "stdlib.h"

void process();

int dim = 5;
bool m[5][5]{{1,0,1,1,1},{0,1,1,0,1},{1,1,1,1,1},{1,1,1,1,1},{0,0,1,1,1}};


int main() {
    process();
    return 0;
}

void process() {
    for(int j = 0; j < dim; j++) {
        for(int i = 0; i < dim; i++) {
            std::cout << (
                          (m[0][j] & m[1][j] & m[2][j] & m[3][j] & m[4][j]) &
                          (m[i][0] & m[i][1] & m[i][2] & m[i][3] & m[i][4])
                          );
        }
        std::cout << std::endl;
    }
}
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the problem can be solved in one pass

saving the matrix in an i X j array.

1 0 1 1 0
0 1 1 1 0
1 1 1 1 1
1 0 1 1 1 
1 1 1 1 1

one each pass save the values of i and j for an element which is 0 in arrays a and b
when first row is scanned a= 1 b = 2,5
when second row is scanned a=1,2 b= 1,2,5
when third row is scanned no change
when fourth row is scanned a= 1,2,4 and b= 1,2,5
when fifth row is scanned no change .

now print all values as 0 for values of i and j saved in a and b rest of the values are 1 ie (3,3) (3,4) (5,3) and (5,4)

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I tried to solve this problem in C#.

I've used two loop variables (i and j) apart from the actual matrix and n representing its dimension

Logic I tried is to:

  1. Calculate AND for rows and cols involved in each concentric square of the matrix
  2. Store it in its corner cells (I've stored them in anti-clockwise order)
  3. Two bool variables are used to retain values of two corners when evaluating a particular square.
  4. This process would end when outer loop (i) is mid way.
  5. Evaluate results of other cells based on the corner cells (for rest of i). Skip the corner cells during this process.
  6. When i reaches n, all cells would have its result except for the corner cells.
  7. Update the corner cells. This is an extra iteration to length of n/2 other than the single pass constraint mentioned in the problem.

Code:

void Evaluate(bool [,] matrix, int n)
{
    bool tempvar1, tempvar2;

    for (var i = 0; i < n; i++)
    {
        tempvar1 = matrix[i, i];
        tempvar2 = matrix[n - i - 1, n - i - 1];

        var j = 0;

        for (j = 0; j < n; j++)
        {
            if ((i < n/2) || (((n % 2) == 1) && (i == n/2) && (j <= i)))
            {
                // store the row and col & results in corner cells of concentric squares
                tempvar1 &= matrix[j, i];
                matrix[i, i] &= matrix[i, j];
                tempvar2 &= matrix[n - j - 1, n - i - 1];
                matrix[n - i - 1, n - i - 1] &= matrix[n - i - 1, n - j - 1];
            }
            else
            {
                // skip corner cells of concentric squares
                if ((j == i) || (j == n - i - 1)) continue;

                // calculate the & values for rest of them
                matrix[i, j] = matrix[i, i] & matrix[n - j - 1, j];
                matrix[n - i - 1, j] = matrix[n - i - 1, n - i - 1] & matrix[n - j - 1, j];

                if ((i == n/2) && ((n % 2) == 1))
                {
                    // if n is odd
                    matrix[i, n - j - 1] = matrix[i, i] & matrix[j, n - j - 1];
                }
            }
        }

        if ((i < n/2) || (((n % 2) == 1) && (i <= n/2)))
        {
            // transfer the values from temp variables to appropriate corner cells of its corresponding square
            matrix[n - i - 1, i] = tempvar1;
            matrix[i, n - i - 1] = tempvar2;
        }
        else if (i == n - 1)
        {
            // update the values of corner cells of each concentric square
            for (j = n/2; j < n; j++)
            {
                tempvar1 = matrix[j, j];
                tempvar2 = matrix[n - j - 1, n - j - 1];

                matrix[j, j] &= matrix[n - j - 1, j];
                matrix[n - j - 1, j] &= tempvar2;

                matrix[n - j - 1, n - j - 1] &= matrix[j, n - j - 1];
                matrix[j, n - j - 1] &= tempvar1;
            }
        }
    }
}
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You can calculate the new value of each cell by multiplying all values of the matrix' column and row of that cell.

edit: I would not do that destructively, just return a new array.

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I'm looking for an answer that uses no extra memory. –  jaircazarin-old-account Dec 4 '08 at 1:21
    
You mean, "in place"? –  Svante Dec 5 '08 at 14:19
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While impossible given the constraints, the most space efficient way to do it is by traversing the matrix in an overlaping, alternating row/column fashion, which would make a pattern similar to laying bricks in a zig-zag fashion:

-----
|----
||---
|||--
||||-

Using this, you would go in each row/column, as indicated, and if you encounter a 0 at any time, set a boolean variable, and re-walk that row/column, setting the entries to 0 as you go.

This will require no extra memory, and will only use one boolean variable. Unfortunately, if the "far" edge is set to all be 0, that is the worst case and you walk the whole array twice.

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I could be wrong, but are you sure this works? When you're doing the 3rd column, say, how do you know whether the value at the top of it, in the first row, was a 1 or a 0 before you processed the first row? –  Steve Jessop Dec 4 '08 at 22:31
    
You don't know, but you also don't need to. If it was a 0, the whole column needs to be 0. If the value on the previous row is 1, you know that all rows above it are 1 (and always have been). –  Dave Sherohman Dec 8 '08 at 15:38
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Based on the result the algorithm is a complex way to say, find all positions where the full row and column are all 1 ?

so any 0 makes its row and column 0 on the target matrix.

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This is a correct re-statement of the problem, yes –  cdeszaq Dec 4 '08 at 2:45
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create a result matrix and set all the values to 1. go through the data matrix as soon as a 0 is encountered, set the result matrix row column to 0

At the end of the first pass, the result matrix will have the correct answer.

Looks pretty simple. Is there a trick I am missing? Are you not allowed to use a result set?

EDIT:

Looks like a F# function, but that is cheating a bit since even though you are doing a single pass, the function can be recursive.

It looks like the interviewer is trying to figure out if you know functional programming.

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Using a result set would be taking extra memory. –  cdeszaq Dec 4 '08 at 2:44
    
Functional programming would not modify the original array in place. –  Svante Dec 5 '08 at 14:20
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Another solution that takes two passes, is to accumulate ANDs horizontally and vertically:

1 0 1 1 0 | 0
0 1 1 1 0 | 0
1 1 1 1 1 | 1
1 0 1 1 1 | 0
1 1 1 1 1 | 1
----------+
0 0 1 1 0

I thought I could design such an algorithm using parity bits, Hamming codes or dynamic programming, possibly using those two booleans as a 2-bit number, but I've had no success yet.

Can you please re-check the problem statement with your engineer and let us know? If there is indeed a solution, I want to keep chipping away at the problem.

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Well, I came up with a single-pass, in-place (non-recursive) solution using 4 bools and 2 loop counters. I've not managed to reduce it to 2 bools and 2 ints, but I wouldn't be surprised if it was possible. It does around 3 reads and 3 writes of each cell, and it should be O(N^2) ie. linear in the array size.

Took me a couple of hours to puzzle this one out - I wouldn't want to have to come up with it under the pressure of an interview! If I've made a booboo I'm too tired to spot it...

Um... I'm choosing to define "single-pass" as making one sweep through the matrix, rather than touching each value once! :-)

#include <stdio.h>
#include <memory.h>

#define SIZE    5

typedef unsigned char u8;

u8 g_Array[ SIZE ][ SIZE ];

void Dump()
{
    for ( int nRow = 0; nRow < SIZE; ++nRow )
    {
    	for ( int nColumn = 0; nColumn < SIZE; ++nColumn )
    	{
    		printf( "%d ", g_Array[ nRow ][ nColumn ] );
    	}
    	printf( "\n" );
    }
}

void Process()
{
    u8 fCarriedAlpha = true;
    u8 fCarriedBeta = true;
    for ( int nStep = 0; nStep < SIZE; ++nStep )
    {
    	u8 fAlpha = (nStep > 0) ? g_Array[ nStep-1 ][ nStep ] : true;
    	u8 fBeta = (nStep > 0) ? g_Array[ nStep ][ nStep - 1 ] : true;
    	fAlpha &= g_Array[ nStep ][ nStep ];
    	fBeta &= g_Array[ nStep ][ nStep ];
    	g_Array[ nStep-1 ][ nStep ] = fCarriedBeta;
    	g_Array[ nStep ][ nStep-1 ] = fCarriedAlpha;
    	for ( int nScan = nStep + 1; nScan < SIZE; ++nScan )
    	{
    		fBeta &= g_Array[ nStep ][ nScan ];
    		if ( nStep > 0 )
    		{
    			g_Array[ nStep ][ nScan ] &= g_Array[ nStep-1 ][ nScan ];
    			g_Array[ nStep-1][ nScan ] = fCarriedBeta;
    		}

    		fAlpha &= g_Array[ nScan ][ nStep ];
    		if ( nStep > 0 )
    		{
    			g_Array[ nScan ][ nStep ] &= g_Array[ nScan ][ nStep-1 ];
    			g_Array[ nScan ][ nStep-1] = fCarriedAlpha;
    		}
    	}

    	g_Array[ nStep ][ nStep ] = fAlpha & fBeta;

    	for ( int nScan = nStep - 1; nScan >= 0; --nScan )
    	{
    		g_Array[ nScan ][ nStep ] &= fAlpha;
    		g_Array[ nStep ][ nScan ] &= fBeta;
    	}
    	fCarriedAlpha = fAlpha;
    	fCarriedBeta = fBeta;
    }
}

int main()
{
    memset( g_Array, 1, sizeof(g_Array) );
    g_Array[0][1] = 0;
    g_Array[0][4] = 0;
    g_Array[1][0] = 0;
    g_Array[1][4] = 0;
    g_Array[3][1] = 0;

    printf( "Input:\n" );
    Dump();
    Process();
    printf( "\nOutput:\n" );
    Dump();

    return 0;
}
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i hope you enjoy my 1-pass c# solution

you can retrieve an element with O(1) and only need the space of one row and one column of the matrix

bool[][] matrix =
{
    new[] { true, false, true, true, false }, // 10110
    new[] { false, true, true, true, false }, // 01110
    new[] { true, true, true, true, true },   // 11111
    new[] { true, false, true, true, true },  // 10111
    new[] { true, true, true, true, true }    // 11111
};

int n = matrix.Length;
bool[] enabledRows = new bool[n];
bool[] enabledColumns = new bool[n];

for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
{
    enabledRows[i] = true;
    enabledColumns[i] = true;
}

for (int rowIndex = 0; rowIndex < n; rowIndex++)
{
    for (int columnIndex = 0; columnIndex < n; columnIndex++)
    {
    	bool element = matrix[rowIndex][columnIndex];
    	enabledRows[rowIndex] &= element;
    	enabledColumns[columnIndex] &= element;
    }
}

for (int rowIndex = 0; rowIndex < n; rowIndex++)
{
    for (int columnIndex = 0; columnIndex < n; columnIndex++)
    {
    	bool element = enabledRows[rowIndex] & enabledColumns[columnIndex];
    	Console.Write(Convert.ToInt32(element));
    }
    Console.WriteLine();
}

/*
    00000
    00000
    00110
    00000
    00110
*/
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I think the only issue may be that you are using two extra arrays of data to make this work. One of the stipulations is to not use extra memory. But nice though! this is basically what I did in my answer :) –  Kenny Cason Jun 21 '11 at 16:24
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1 pass, 2 booleans. I just have to assume the integer indexes in the iterations don't count.

This is not a complete solution but I can't get pass this point.

If I could only determine if a 0 is an original 0 or a 1 that was converted to a 0 then I wouldn't have to use -1's and this would work.

My output is like this:

-1  0 -1 -1  0
 0 -1 -1 -1  0
-1 -1  1  1 -1
-1  0 -1 -1 -1
-1 -1  1  1 -1

The originality of my approach is using the first half of the examination of a row or column to determine if it contains a 0 and the last half to set the values - this is done by looking at x and width-x and then y and height-y in each iteration. Based on the results of the first half of the iteration, if a 0 in the row or column was found, I use the last half of the iteration to change the 1's to -1's.

I just realized this could be done with only 1 boolean leaving 1 to ...?

I'm posting this hoping someone might say, "Ah, just do this..." (And I spent way too much time on it not to post.)

Here's the code in VB:

Dim D(,) As Integer = {{1, 0, 1, 1, 1}, {0, 1, 1, 0, 1}, {1, 1, 1, 1, 1}, {1, 1, 1, 1, 1}, {0, 0, 1, 1, 1}}

Dim B1, B2 As Boolean

For y As Integer = 0 To UBound(D)

    B1 = True : B2 = True

    For x As Integer = 0 To UBound(D)

        // Scan row for 0's at x and width - x positions. Halfway through I'll konw if there's a 0 in this row.
        //If a 0 is found set my first boolean to false.
        If x <= (Math.Ceiling((UBound(D) + 1) / 2) - 1) Then
            If D(x, y) = 0 Or D(UBound(D) - x, y) = 0 Then B1 = False
        End If

        //If the boolean is false then a 0 in this row was found. Spend the last half of this loop
        //updating the values. This is where I'm stuck. If I change a 1 to a 0 it will cause the column
        //scan to fail. So for now I change to a -1. If there was a way to change to 0 yet later tell if
        //the value had changed this would work.
        If Not B1 Then
            If x >= (Math.Ceiling((UBound(D) + 1) / 2) - 1) Then
                If D(x, y) = 1 Then D(x, y) = -1
                If D(UBound(D) - x, y) = 1 Then D(UBound(D) - x, y) = -1
            End If
        End If

        //These 2 block do the same as the first 2 blocks but I switch x and y to do the column.
        If x <= (Math.Ceiling((UBound(D) + 1) / 2) - 1) Then
            If D(y, x) = 0 Or D(y, UBound(D) - x) = 0 Then B2 = False
        End If

        If Not B2 Then
            If x >= (Math.Ceiling((UBound(D) + 1) / 2) - 1) Then
                If D(y, x) = 1 Then D(y, x) = -1
                If D(y, UBound(D) - x) = 1 Then D(y, UBound(D) - x) = -1
            End If
        End If

    Next
Next
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No one is using binary forms? since it's only 1 and 0. We can use binary vectors.

def set1(M, N):
    '''Set 1/0s on M according to the rules.

    M is a list of N integers. Each integer represents a binary array, e.g.,
    000100'''
    ruler = 2**N-1
    for i,v in enumerate(M):
        ruler = ruler & M[i]
        M[i] = M[i] if M[i]==2**N-1 else 0  # set i-th row to all-0 if not all-1s
    for i,v in enumerate(M):
        if M[i]: M[i] = ruler
    return M

Here's the test:

M = [ 0b10110,
      0b01110,
      0b11111,
      0b10111,
      0b11111 ]

print "Before..."
for i in M: print "{:0=5b}".format(i)

M = set1(M, len(M))
print "After..."
for i in M: print "{:0=5b}".format(i)

And the output:

Before...
10110
01110
11111
10111
11111
After...
00000
00000
00110
00000
00110
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You can do something like this to use one pass but an input and output matrix:

output(x,y) = col(xy) & row(xy) == 2^n

where col(xy) is the bits in the column containing the point xy; row(xy) is the bits in the row containing the point xy. n is the size of the matrix.

Then just loop over the input. Possibly expandable to be more space efficient?

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One matrix scan, two booleans, no recursion.

How to avoid the second pass? The second pass is needed to clear the rows or columns when the zero appeares at their end.

However this problem can be solved, because when we scan row #i we already know the row status for the row #i-1. So, while we are scanning the row #i we can simultaneously clear the row #i-1 if it is needed.

The same solution works for columns, but we need to scan rows and columns simultaneously while the data is not changed by the next iteration.

Two booleans are required to store the status of first row and first column, because their values will be changed during the execution of main part of the algorithm.

To avoid adding more booleans we are storing the "clear" flag for the rows and columns in the first row and column of the matrix.

public void Run()
{
    const int N = 5;

    int[,] m = new int[N, N] 
                {{ 1, 0, 1, 1, 0 },
                { 1, 1, 1, 1, 0 },
                { 1, 1, 1, 1, 1 },
                { 1, 0, 1, 1, 1 },
                { 1, 1, 1, 1, 1 }};

    bool keepFirstRow = (m[0, 0] == 1);
    bool keepFirstColumn = keepFirstRow;

    for (int i = 1; i < N; i++)
    {
        keepFirstRow = keepFirstRow && (m[0, i] == 1);
        keepFirstColumn = keepFirstColumn && (m[i, 0] == 1);
    }

    Print(m); // show initial setup

    m[0, 0] = 1; // to protect first row from clearing by "second pass"

    // "second pass" is performed over i-1 row/column, 
    // so we use one more index just to complete "second pass" over the 
    // last row/column
    for (int i = 1; i <= N; i++)
    {
        for (int j = 1; j <= N; j++)
        {
            // "first pass" - searcing for zeroes in row/column #i
            // when i = N || j == N it is additional pass for clearing 
            // the previous row/column
            // j >= i because cells with j < i may be already modified 
            // by "second pass" part
            if (i < N && j < N && j >= i) 
            {
                m[i, 0] &= m[i, j];
                m[0, j] &= m[i, j];

                m[0, i] &= m[j, i];
                m[j, 0] &= m[j, i];
            }

            // "second pass" - clearing the row/column scanned 
            // in the previous iteration
            if (m[i - 1, 0] == 0 && j < N)
            {
                m[i - 1, j] = 0;
            }

            if (m[0, i - 1] == 0 && j < N)
            {
                m[j, i - 1] = 0;
            }
        }

        Print(m);
    }

    // Clear first row/column if needed
    if (!keepFirstRow || !keepFirstColumn)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < N; i++)
        {
            if (!keepFirstRow)
            {
                m[0, i] = 0;
            }
            if (!keepFirstColumn)
            {
                m[i, 0] = 0;
            }
        }
    }

    Print(m);

    Console.ReadLine();
}

private static void Print(int[,] m)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < m.GetLength(0); i++)
    {
        for (int j = 0; j < m.GetLength(1); j++)
        {
            Console.Write(" " + m[i, j]);
        }
        Console.WriteLine();
    }
    Console.WriteLine();
}
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seems like the following works with no additional space requirements:

first note that multiplying the elements of the row times the elements of the line in which an element is, gives the desired value.

In order not to use any additional space (not making a new matrix and filling it up but instead apply changes to the matrix directly), start top left of the matrix and do the computation for any ixi matrix (that "starts" at (0,0)) before considering any element with any index > i.

hope this works (havent testet)

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Seems to be incorrect. Assume that row 0 has only 1 values. If the final value you set for (0,0) is 0, then you'll later set the complete row to 0, which isn't necessarily correct. You actually need to store 2 values per cell in order to do it dynamic programming style, using your principle. –  Eyal Schneider Apr 8 '13 at 15:13
    
sure, you are right. Instead of storing two values I could also use a third posibility, say -1, that stands for cells that are 1 in the "old" matrix which eventually will be replaced by a 0. Of course, that way, one has to take absolute values after multiplications. In the end, all -1 are replaced by 0's. –  olodnad Apr 9 '13 at 12:04
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This is TESTED for different N in C++, and is:
ONE PASS, TWO BOOLS, NO RECURSION, NO EXTRA MEMORY, HOLDS FOR ARBITRARLY LARGE N
(So far none of the solutions here do ALL of these.)

More specifically, I'm amusing two loop counters are okay. I have two const unsigneds, which only exist rather than being computed every time for readability. The outer loop's interval is [0, N], and the inner loop's interval is [1, n - 1]. The switch statement is in the loop mostly exists to show very clearly that it really is just one pass.

Algorithm Strategy:

The first trick is to us a row and a column from the matrix itself to accumulate the content of the matrix, this memory becomes available by offloading all we really need to know from the first row and column into two booleans. The second trick is to get two passes out of one, by using the symmetry of the sub-matrix and its indices.

Algorithm Synopsis:

  • Scan the first row and store if they are all ones in a boolean, do the same for the first column storing the result in a second boolean.
  • For the sub-matrix excluding the first row and the first column: iterate through, left to right, top to bottom, as one would read a paragraph. Upon visiting each element, also visit the corresponding element that would be visited if visiting the sub-matrix in reverse. For each element visited AND its value into the where its row crosses the first column, and also AND its value into where its column crosses the first row.
  • Once the center of the sub-matrix is reached, continue to visit the two elements simultaneously as above. However now set the visited elements' value to the AND of where its row crosses the first column, and of where its column crosses the first row. After this, the sub-matrix is complete.
  • Use the two boolean variables computed at the begging to set the first row, and the first column to their correct values.

Templatized C++ Implementation:

template<unsigned n>
void SidewaysAndRowColumn(int((&m)[n])[n]) {
    bool fcol = m[0][0] ? true : false;
    bool frow = m[0][0] ? true : false;
    for (unsigned d = 0; d <= n; ++d) {
        for (unsigned i = 1; i < n; ++i) {
            switch (d) {
                case 0:
                    frow    = frow && m[d][i];
                    fcol    = fcol && m[i][d];
                    break;
                default:
                {
                    unsigned const rd = n - d;
                    unsigned const ri = n - i;
                    if (d * n + i < rd * n + ri)
                    {
                        m[ d][ 0] &= m[ d][ i];
                        m[ 0][ d] &= m[ i][ d];
                        m[ 0][ i] &= m[ d][ i];
                        m[ i][ 0] &= m[ i][ d];
                        m[rd][ 0] &= m[rd][ri];
                        m[ 0][rd] &= m[ri][rd];
                        m[ 0][ri] &= m[rd][ri];
                        m[ri][ 0] &= m[ri][rd];
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        m[ d][ i] = m[ d][0] & m[0][ i];
                        m[rd][ri] = m[rd][0] & m[0][ri];
                    }
                    break;
                }
                case n:
                    if (!frow)
                        m[0][i] = 0;
                    if (!fcol)
                        m[i][0] = 0;
            };
        }
    }
    m[0][0] = (frow && fcol) ? 1 : 0;
}
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import java.util.ArrayList;

public class MultiplyExceptSelf {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        int arr[][] = { {1,0,1,0},
                        {1,0,1,0},
                        {1,0,0,0},
                        {0,0,0,0}
                      };

        ArrayList<Integer> xcor = new ArrayList<Integer>();
        ArrayList<Integer> ycor = new ArrayList<Integer>();

        for(int i=0; i<4; i++) {
            for(int j=0; j<4; j++) {
                if(arr[i][j] == 1) {
                    if(xcor.contains(i)) {

                    }
                    else {
                        xcor.add(i);
                    }
                    if(ycor.contains(j)) {

                    }
                    else {
                        ycor.add(j);
                    }
                }
            }
        }

        System.out.println(xcor);
        System.out.println(ycor);

        for(int i=0; i<xcor.size(); i++) {
            for(int j=0; j<4; j++) {
                arr[xcor.get(i)][j] = 1;
            }
        }

        for(int i=0; i<ycor.size(); i++) {
            for(int j=0;j<4;j++) {
                arr[j][ycor.get(i)] = 1;
            }
        }

        for(int i=0; i<4; i++) {
            for(int j=0; j<4; j++) {
                System.out.print(arr[i][j]);
            }
            System.out.println("\n");
        }
    }
}
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int[,] A = { 
        { 1, 0, 1, 1, 0 }, 
        { 0, 1, 1, 1, 0 }, 
        { 1, 1, 1, 1, 1 }, 
        { 1, 0, 1, 1, 1 }, 
        { 1, 1, 1, 1, 1 } };

int i, j;
int[] r = new int[5]; 
int[] c = new int[5];

for(i=0;i<5;i++)
{
    r[i]=1; c[i]=1;
    for(j=0; j<5; j++)
    {
        r[i]=A[i,j]*r[i];
        c[i]=A[j,i]*c[i];
    }
}

for(i=0;i<5;i++)
    for(j=0;j<5;j++)
        A[i,j] = r[i]*r[j];

for(i=0;i<5;i++)
{
    for(j=0;j<5;j++)
    {
        Console.Write("{0}\t", A[i,j]);
    }
    Console.WriteLine();
}
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Ok, I realize that it isn't quite a match, but I got it in one pass using a bool and a byte instead of two bools... close. I also wouldn't vouch for the efficiency of it but these types of questions often require less than optimal solutions.

private static void doIt(byte[,] matrix)
{
    byte zeroCols = 0;
    bool zeroRow = false;

    for (int row = 0; row <= matrix.GetUpperBound(0); row++)
    {
        zeroRow = false;
        for (int col = 0; col <= matrix.GetUpperBound(1); col++)
        {
            if (matrix[row, col] == 0)
            {

                zeroRow = true;
                zeroCols |= (byte)(Math.Pow(2, col));

                // reset this column in previous rows
                for (int innerRow = 0; innerRow < row; innerRow++)
                {
                    matrix[innerRow, col] = 0;
                }

                // reset the previous columns in this row
                for (int innerCol = 0; innerCol < col; innerCol++)
                {
                    matrix[row, innerCol] = 0;
                }
            }
            else if ((int)(zeroCols & ((byte)Math.Pow(2, col))) > 0)
            {
                matrix[row, col] = 0;
            }

            // Force the row to zero
            if (zeroRow) { matrix[row, col] = 0; }
        }
    }
}
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You can sorta do it in one pass -- if you don't count accessing the matrix in random-access order, which eliminates the benefits of doing it single-pass in the first place (cache-coherence/memory-bandwidth).

[edit: simple, but wrong solution deleted]

You should get better performance than any single-pass method by doing it in two passes: one to accumulate row/column info, and one to apply it. The array (in row-major order) is accessed coherently; for arrays exceeding the cache size (but whose rows can fit in cache), data should be read from memory twice, and stored once:

void fixmatrix2(int M[][], int rows, int cols) {
    bool clearZeroRow= false;
    bool clearZeroCol= false;
    for(int j=0; j < cols; ++j) {
        if( ! M[0][j] ) {
            clearZeroRow= true;
        }
    }
    for(int i=1; i < rows; ++i) { // scan/accumulate pass
        if( ! M[i][0] ) {
            clearZeroCol= true;
        }
        for(int j=1; j < cols; ++j) {
            if( ! M[i][j] ) {
                M[0][j]= 0;
                M[i][0]= 0;
            }
        }
    }
    for(int i=1; i < rows; ++i) { // update pass
        if( M[i][0] ) {
            for(int j=0; j < cols; ++j) {
                if( ! M[j][0] ) {
                    M[i][j]= 0;
                }
            }
        } else {
            for(int j=0; j < cols; ++j) {
                M[i][j]= 0;
            }
        }
        if(clearZeroCol) {
            M[i][0]= 0;
        }
    }
    if(clearZeroRow) {
        for(int j=0; j < cols; ++j) {
            M[0][j]= 0;
        }
    }
}
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Here is my Ruby implementation with the the test included, This would take O(MN) space. If we want a real time update (like to show the results when we find zeros rather than waiting the first loop of finding zeros) we can just create another class variable like @output and whenever we find a zero we update @output and not @input.

require "spec_helper"


class Matrix
    def initialize(input)
        @input  = input
        @zeros  = []
    end

    def solve
        @input.each_with_index do |row, i|          
            row.each_with_index do |element, j|                             
                @zeros << [i,j] if element == 0
            end
        end

        @zeros.each do |x,y|
            set_h_zero(x)
            set_v_zero(y)
        end

        @input
    end


    private 

    def set_h_zero(row)     
        @input[row].map!{0}     
    end

    def set_v_zero(col)
        @input.size.times do |r|
            @input[r][col] = 0
        end
    end
end


describe "Matrix" do
  it "Should set the row and coloum of Zero to Zeros" do
    input =  [[1, 3, 4, 9, 0], 
              [0, 3, 5, 0, 8], 
              [1, 9, 6, 1, 9], 
              [8, 3, 2, 0, 3]]

    expected = [[0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
                [0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
                [0, 9, 6, 0, 0],
                [0, 0, 0, 0, 0]]

    matrix = Matrix.new(input)

    expect(matrix.solve).to eq(expected)
  end
end
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