Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a class contains 10 methods which are doing almost the same things apart from one key event. Two examples are given below:


Public String ATypeOperation(String pin, String amount){
    doSomething();
    doMoreStuff();
    requestBuilder.buildATypeRequest(pin, amount);
    doAfterStuff();
}



Public String BTypeOperation(String name, String sex, String age){
    doSomething();
    doMoreStuff();
    requestBuilder.buildBTypeRequest(name, sex, age);
    doAfterStuff();
}

As you can see from the above methods, they are similar apart from calling different methods provided by requestBuilder. The rest 8 are similar too. There is a lot duplicated code here. I feel there is a better way to implement this, but don’t know how. Any ideas and suggestions are appreciated.

Thanks, Sarah

share|improve this question
1  
Is your request actually used in the method? –  helpermethod Aug 3 '10 at 7:20
    
@Helper Yes, it is. You can say it is used in doAfterSuff(); –  sarahTheButterFly Aug 3 '10 at 7:23
add comment

6 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Use something like RequestBuilder, that accepts all these kinds of parameters:

public RequestBuilder {
    // setters and getters for all properties

    public Request build() {
         doStuff();
         Request request = new Request(this);
         doAfterStuff();
         return request;
    }
}

and then

new RequestBuilder().setAge(age).setName(name).build();
share|improve this answer
    
I have a question here. When a client who uses the RequestBuilder(), How do he know what parameters he should set? Take the two methods in my post for example, I would have to ask the client to choose to set 2 of the 5 possible parameters. How can we be sure that the client won't set a wrong parameter? –  sarahTheButterFly Aug 4 '10 at 0:41
    
it sets whichever it wants (has 'at hand'). If he combination is not sufficient, throw an exception. –  Bozho Aug 4 '10 at 6:13
    
You pass the mandatory params in the RequestBuilder constructor and any optional param by additional method calls before calling build. Thats what the builder is made for: many optional params (to reduce telescoping constructors) @bozo you should really set the mandatory params in the builders constructor –  atamanroman Aug 4 '10 at 6:16
    
@fielding of course, but I didn't know there are such - from the above example there is not a single required param. –  Bozho Aug 4 '10 at 6:44
    
I know that you know, but that doesnt come out with the example provided. I think that was what sarah was asking for: "... How do he know what parameters he should set? ..." –  atamanroman Aug 4 '10 at 6:59
add comment
interface RequestBuilder {
  void doStuff(params);
}

public RequestBuilder getARequestBuilder() {
  return new RequestBuilder() {
    void doStuff(params) {  
      // impl.details
    }
  }
}    

public RequestBuilder getBRequestBuilder() {
  return new RequestBuilder() {
    void doStuff(params) {  
      // impl.details
    }
  }
}    

public String buildRequest(yourParams, RequestBuilder builder){
  doBefore();
  builder.doStuff(yourParams);
  doAfter();
}

I think this is called the Strategy pattern. It looks a lot like the Command pattern but because you encapsulate an algorithm it seems to be Strategy :)

What Bozho suggest is the Builder pattern.

I recommend you browse through a list of patterns some time, or buy Head First Patterns. Really fun reading.

share|improve this answer
    
I wasnt sure either if this was a command or strategy pattern. Your decoupling an algo (strategy) but on the other hand this is clearly an encapsulated method call (command). Maybe someone can tell why its which pattern. I'd say its command although the method is called immediately :) –  atamanroman Aug 4 '10 at 6:10
    
@fielding I guess it is the intent which matters most. But I only use patterns (sometimes without knowing it's a pattern:) and I am not a theoretical patterns kind of guy. –  extraneon Aug 4 '10 at 7:48
add comment

You could pass the builder object to a generic buildRequest method. Since not only the algorithm but also the arguments vary, i put them into the builder. I dont think thats a nice solution but i wanted to show a command pattern here :D (Extraneon showed how to decouple params and command)

    // call somewhere in the code:
    Builder b = new BTypeBuilder();
    b.age = "20"; b.sex = "female"; b.name = "eve";
    String res = buildRequest(b);

    Public String buildRequest(Builder builder)
    {
        doSomething();
        doMoreStuff();
        builder.build();
        doAfterStuff();
    }

    // Command pattern
    class BTypeBuilder implements Builder
    {
        String name, age, sex;

        // Constructor here

        void build() 
        {
            // Do your stuff here
        }
    }

    class ATypeBuilder implements Builder
    {
        String pin, amount;

        // Constructor here

        void build() 
        {
            // Do your stuff here
        }
    }

    public interface Builder 
    { 
        void build();
    }
share|improve this answer
    
I like your solution. But I think it exposes the BTypeBuilder() to a client. Which means the client has to know about all the different types of builders. Isn't that 'tight coupling'? –  sarahTheButterFly Aug 4 '10 at 0:50
    
You could introduce some sort of Builder-Factory. A static factory method should be sufficient and hides all the different builders. It depends on what your doing. If this is part of your public api, the effort is reasonable. If its not, i would not go so far. Btw: If you like an answer, upvote it ;) –  atamanroman Aug 4 '10 at 6:23
    
Haha...just upvoted your post! Thanks for answering my question. ;) –  sarahTheButterFly Aug 5 '10 at 3:59
add comment

In addition to other answers, this might also be useful for you (If you want to just plugin your method, not using your parameters for 'before' and 'after' methods)

interface Function0<R> {
    R apply();
}

public void performOperation(Function0<Void> operation) {
    doSomething(); 
    doBeforeStuff(); 
    operation.apply();
    doAfterStuff(); 

}

then you could use it like this,

    final RequestBuilder builder = new RequestBuilder();
    performOperation(new Function0<Void>() {
        public Void apply() {
            builder.buildATypeRequest("1234", "2445");
            return null;
        }
    });

    performOperation(new Function0<Void>() {
        public Void apply() {
            builder.buildBTypeRequest("1234", "2445", "1234");
            return null;
        }
    });
share|improve this answer
add comment

Instead of sending a long parameter list just push all the parameters in a map and send that map as argument.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmmm..If parameter list size is less than 6 (or 4?), then it is ok. Actually better than push them in a map I think. How does your user know what to put in the map? –  sarahTheButterFly Aug 4 '10 at 0:53
    
Where does this help anything? You have to add new validation because you cant tell anymore if the map contains fitting objects. It would be better to introduce some sort of Person class, which could group name, sex and age. If your having many params, try to introduce factories or builders. But this has nothing to do with the initial question. –  atamanroman Aug 4 '10 at 6:26
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.