Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've recently started learning C#. I just learned about properties and decided to make a simple program in order to understand them more. this is the code I wrote:

  class Dog
{
    private int weight;
    private string colour;
    public string colour { get; set; }
    public Dog(int theWeight, string theColour)
    {
        weight = theWeight;
        colour = theColour;
    }
}

And i get an ambiguity error. As far a I understand, this shouldn't happen.

share|improve this question
    
What happens when you use an upper-case 'C' for the property Colour? –  Shankar R10N Aug 3 '10 at 7:42

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You have field and property with the same name colour. That is why the compiler produces an error.

share|improve this answer

ambiguity error is that you named field and property tha same name "colour". change the property definition f.e.

public string Colour
{
 get { return colour;}
 set { colour = value;}
}
share|improve this answer

You can't have both a field and a property with the same name.

You need to rename one of the two colour identifiers.

share|improve this answer

In the line

colour = theColour;

the compiler can't tell what you mean. It could be either

private string colour;

or it could be

public string colour { get; set }

To disambiguate choosing a different naming convention helps. For example you could choose that properties have an uppercase first letter and fields start with an underscore and a lower case letter. In that case your class would look as follows:

class Dog
{
   private int _weight;
   private string _colour;
   public string Colour { get; set; }
   public Dog(int theWeight, string theColour)
   {
      _weight = theWeight;
      _colour = theColour;
   }
}

Note, though, that you probably have a duplication here anyways. Chances are that it wasn't your intention to have both the automatic property Colour and the field _colour in the first place.

You can also choose a tool to help you follow recommended guidelines. As an example have a look at FxCop. There is not right or wrong but it is certainly easier to work with rules that are generally accepted. (Admittedly my suggestion to use underscores for fields is not in line with what is generally accepted. However, I don't use public fields.)

share|improve this answer
    
using this way will end up with 2 different colour properties/variables. Probably the user only wants one (remove _colour) –  RvdK Aug 3 '10 at 8:21
    
Yes. That's why I mentioned in my answer: "Note, though, that you probably have a duplication here anyways. Chances are that it wasn't your intention to have both the automatic property Colour and the field _colour in the first place." –  Manfred Aug 3 '10 at 8:43

Note that in your example, if you're using C# 3.0 or above, you don't really need those private fields and can use auto-implemented properties:

More details about it here... http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb384054.aspx

It will avoid the confusion problems, by either the programmer and the compiler, and improve readability.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.