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What's happening behind the scenes when I do a concatenation on a string?

my $short = 'short';
$short .= 'cake';

Is Perl effectively creating a new string, then assigning it the correct variable reference, or are Perl strings always mutable by nature?

The motivation for this question came from a discussion I had with a colleague, who said that scripting languages can utilize immutable strings.

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Any solid references in perldoc would be appreciated. –  Zaid Aug 3 '10 at 9:50
    
the solid references might be too solid to some: perldoc perlguts and look for and around SvGROW. Otherwise, the response from @eugene is the one you are looking for. –  Dummy00001 Aug 3 '10 at 10:31
    
the perlfunc documentation of substr (as both an lvalue and a 4-argument invocation) describes modifying strings themselves: growing, shrinking and replacing parts. –  pilcrow Aug 3 '10 at 13:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Perl strings are mutable. Perl automatically creates new buffers, if required.

use Devel::Peek;
my $short = 'short';

Dump($short);
Dump($short .= 'cake');
Dump($short = "");

SV = PV(0x28403038) at 0x284766f4
  REFCNT = 1
  FLAGS = (PADMY,POK,pPOK)
  PV = 0x28459078 "short"\0
  CUR = 5
  LEN = 8
SV = PV(0x28403038) at 0x284766f4
  REFCNT = 1
  FLAGS = (PADMY,POK,pPOK)
  PV = 0x28458120 "shortcake"\0
  CUR = 9
  LEN = 12
SV = PV(0x28403038) at 0x284766f4
  REFCNT = 1
  FLAGS = (PADMY,POK,pPOK)
  PV = 0x28458120 ""\0
  CUR = 0
  LEN = 12

Note that no new buffer is allocated in the third case.

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2  
Perl uses realloc, which may or may not get an entirely new buffer –  ysth Aug 3 '10 at 10:06
    
Note that perl allocates room for a trailing nul, even though it doesn't use it to determine length. Also note that wherever possible it knows the granularity of the malloc library and rounds allocations up –  ysth Aug 3 '10 at 10:22

Perl strings are definitely mutable. Each will store an allocated buffer size in addition to the used length and beginning offset, and the buffer will be expanded as needed. (The beginning offset is useful to allow consumptive operations like s/^abc// to not have to move the actual data.)

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1  
Is there a hard reference to this in perldoc? –  Zaid Aug 3 '10 at 9:35
    
@Zaid: not that I know of offhand –  ysth Aug 3 '10 at 9:52
$short = 'short';
print \$short;

$short .= 'cake';
print \$short;

After executing this code I get "SCALAR(0x955f468)SCALAR(0x955f468)". My answer would be 'mutable'.

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7  
Perl scalars are actually composed of two separate sections; one of fixed size, and an optional one of variable (depending on type of values stored) size. The address there is of the fixed size component; it's entirely plausible that the variable component be swapped out for a new one. But in fact this is not the case. :) –  ysth Aug 3 '10 at 9:35

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